WBEZ | rwanda http://www.wbez.org/tags/rwanda Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Global Activism: Every Child is My Child Educates Kids in Rwanda and Burundi http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-every-child-my-child-educates-kids-rwanda-and-burundi-114719 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ga-every child.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>For our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a>&nbsp;series, in 2012, we first spoke with former high school teacher, Elizabeth Powley. She believes that &ldquo;every child has the right to learn.&rdquo; She has a special love for the children of Africa&rsquo;s Great Lakes region (Rwanda and Burundi). Powley founded the NGO, <a href="http://everychildismychild.org/">Every Child is My Child</a>, because she envisions a world in which &ldquo;every girl and boy in Africa has access to secondary school.&rdquo; She is also executive director of Heartland Alliance International - part of Heartland Alliance, the Chicago-based group that &ldquo;helps endangered populations &mdash; particularly the poor, the isolated, and the displaced.&rdquo; Powley is back to update us on her goal for &ldquo;communities [to] see an entire generation of students educated &ndash; for the first time &ndash; beyond the elementary school level.&rdquo;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240875260&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 07 Jan 2016 09:41:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-every-child-my-child-educates-kids-rwanda-and-burundi-114719 Did North Korea Detonate a Hydrogen Bomb? http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-07/did-north-korea-detonate-hydrogen-bomb-114413 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/North Korea small.jpg" title="People watch a TV news program showing North Korea's announcement, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016. North Korea said Wednesday it had conducted a hydrogen bomb test. The letters read ‘Will not use nuclear weapon if autonomy secured’ (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240872500&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><strong style="font-size: 24px;">North Korea Hydrogen bomb controversy</strong></p><p>The Republic of North Korea claimed on Wednesday that it set off a hydrogen bomb. Initial reports varied as to whether it was a hydrogen or atomic bomb, but now, many doubt there was any detonation of that magnitude. &nbsp;The White House was skeptical, stating that according to its analysis, North Korea&rsquo;s activity &quot;is not consistent&quot; with the claim. We&rsquo;ll talk about the mystery of DPRK&rsquo;s hydrogen detonation with Bruce Cumings, professor of history at the University of Chicago. He&rsquo;s author of numerous books on the Korean Peninsula including, <em>Parallax Visions: Making Sense of American-East Asian Relations at the End of the Century</em> and <em>North Korea: Another Country</em>.</p><p><strong>GUEST</strong>: <a href="https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/bruce-cumings">Bruce Cumings</a> is&nbsp; professor of history at the University of Chicago and author of <em>Parallax Visions: Making Sense of American-East Asian Relations at the End of the Century</em>, <em>The Korean War: A History</em> and <em>North Korea: Another Country</em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240874742&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><strong>Film looks at how U.S. recruits drone operators</strong></span></p><p>The documentary film &ldquo;Drone,&rdquo; takes an inside look at the CIA&rsquo;s drone program- exploring in depth how the government recruits drone operators. &nbsp;One of the places they recruit- video game conventions. We&rsquo;ll talk with the film&rsquo;s director, Tonje Hessen Schei.</p><p><em><strong><a href="http://www.facets.org/cinematheque/films/jan2016/drone.php">&quot;Drone&quot; is showing at Facets Multimedia through January 14, 2016</a></strong></em></p><p><strong>GUEST</strong>: Tonje Hessen Schei is a filmmaker and director of the documentary, &ldquo;<a href="http://www.dronethedocumentary.com/#top">Drone</a>&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240875260&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><strong>Global Activism: Every Child is My Child helps kids in Rwanda and Burundi</strong></span></p><p>For our <em>Global Activism</em> series, we first spoke in 2012 with former high school teacher, Elizabeth Powley. She believes that &ldquo;every child has the right to learn.&rdquo; She has a special love for the children of Africa&rsquo;s Great Lakes region (Rwanda and Burundi). Powley founded the NGO, Every Child is My Child, because she envisions a world in which &ldquo;every girl and boy in Africa has access to secondary school.&rdquo; She is also executive director of Heartland Alliance International - part of Heartland Alliance, the Chicago-based group that &ldquo;helps endangered populations &mdash; particularly the poor, the isolated, and the displaced.&rdquo; Powley is back to update us on her goal for &ldquo;communities [to] see an entire generation of students educated &ndash; for the first time &ndash; beyond the elementary school level.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>GUEST</strong>: Elizabeth Powley is founder of <a href="http://www.everychildismychild.org">Every Child is My Child</a> and executive director of Heartland Alliance International</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240875472&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><strong>World History Minute: Founding of Liberia</strong></span></p><p>On January 7, 1822 the schooner <em>Elizabeth</em> arrived off Providence Island, Liberia with the first emigrants ready to colonize the country that would be named Liberia, meaning &ldquo;land of the free.&rdquo;&nbsp; Historian John Schmidt recalls how it all began.</p><p><strong>GUEST</strong>: <a href="https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/">John Schmidt</a>, historian and author of <em>On This Day in Chicago History</em></p></p> Thu, 07 Jan 2016 09:20:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-07/did-north-korea-detonate-hydrogen-bomb-114413 Mollenbeek: A look at Brussels' immigrant neighborhood http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-18/mollenbeek-look-brussels-immigrant-neighborhood-113842 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_628937859283.jpg" title="(Photo: Associated Press/Virginia Mayo)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/233666094&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Belgian immigration after the Paris attacks</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">The investigation into the terror attacks in Paris has focused attention on Belgium. Investigators believe the attacks were planned there. Belgium has sent the largest number of foreign fighters in Europe to join ISIS. The country&rsquo;s been linked to several other terror attacks in recent years, and several with ties to a neighborhood in Brussels called Molenbeek. The area has a large Muslim and immigrant population. Brussels, like France, has struggled to integrate its immigrants. We&rsquo;ll take a look at Belgium&rsquo;s immigrant communities and the Molenbeek neighborhood in particular with Marco Martiniello, a professor of sociology at the University of Liege in Belgium.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1e7164c0-1c54-a2b3-d8cb-bbc59ec84ac9"><a href="http://twitter.com/MarcoMartiniell">Marco Martiniello</a> is a professor of sociology at the <a href="http://twitter.com/UniversiteLiege">University of Liege</a>.&nbsp;</span></em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/233666594&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">EcoMyths: Is food waste unavoidable?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">According to the Worldwatch Institute, Americans waste three times more food between Thanksgiving and New Year&rsquo;s than the rest of the year. Globally, we waste one-third of all food produced for us to eat (1.3 billion tons), according to the UN&rsquo;s Food and Agriculture Organization. For our EcoMyths segment, Kate Sackman of EcoMyths Alliance joins us with Dr. Barbara Willard of DePaul University, to bust the myth that large holiday food bills and waste are inevitable.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1e7164c0-1c59-a303-7f74-b2f2c0330ca6">Dr. Barbara Willard is an environmental science communications expert, and an associate professor at <a href="http://twitter.com/DePaulU">DePaul University</a>. </span></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1e7164c0-1c59-b7be-6864-fa958186bd2a">Kate Sackman is the founder and president of <a href="http://twitter.com/EcoMyths">EcoMyths Alliance</a>. </span></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/Bkosson">Beth Kosson</a> is the education and outreach director for EcoMyths Alliance.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/233667033&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Notes: &#39;The Good Ones&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Tutsi, Hutu and Twa. The three tribes from the African country of Rwanda have come together in the form of the band The Good Ones. The quartet is led by subsitance farmer Adrien Kazigira who went looking for the best musicians around, ergo the name of the band. The band consists of acoustic guitar, tight harmonies and minimal percussion ( boots). This week on Global Notes, Morning Shift and Radio M host Tony Sarabia brings us music from the band&rsquo;s lastest effort, the album Rwanda is My Home.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1e7164c0-1c5d-39ba-85f5-96dd9865d025"><a href="http://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia </a>is the host of <a href="http://twitter.com/WBEZmorning">Morning Shift</a> and Radio M.&nbsp;</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Wed, 18 Nov 2015 14:29:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-11-18/mollenbeek-look-brussels-immigrant-neighborhood-113842 Global Activism: Fighting HIV in Chicago and Rwanda http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-fighting-hiv-chicago-and-rwanda-112643 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219110439&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-16fbe9b0-2896-096c-acff-ee92829e5337">Awareness and improving drug regimens have generally decreased HIV-infection and improved life-span for &nbsp;HIV survivors. But Sub-Saharan Africa is still an epicenter of an HIV/AIDS epidemic. In Rwanda, HIV-infection among the young &nbsp;accounts for 40% of new infections, according to the WHO. &nbsp;We&rsquo;ll talk with <a href="http://publichealth.uic.edu/ghp/faculty/geridonenberg/">Geri Donenberg</a>, a dean of Research at UIC&#39;s School of Public Health. She works in HIV prevention and understanding the effects of early violence on Chicago&rsquo;s African American community. Donenberg also, through the Kigali Imbereheza Project, utilizes trauma-focused intervention to get Rwandan youth access to HIV drugs and help them deal with depression. Joining her is Mojdeh Stoakley, a Chicago artist and Donenberg&rsquo;s research assistant. For <em>Global Activism</em>, they&rsquo;ll tell us about some of the parallels of fighting HIV in Chicago and Africa.</span></p></p> Thu, 13 Aug 2015 10:40:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-fighting-hiv-chicago-and-rwanda-112643 Remembering the Rwandan genocide http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-07/remembering-rwandan-genocide-109980 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Rwanda.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Twenty years ago today marks the beginning of one of the worst genocides of the 20th century. Estimates put the dead from the 100-day slaughter at close to one million people. We deconstruct what happened with former General Romeo Dallaire, head of U.N. peacekeepers in Rwanda in 1994.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-remembering-the-rwandan-genocide/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-remembering-the-rwandan-genocide.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-remembering-the-rwandan-genocide" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Remembering the Rwandan genocide" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 11:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-04-07/remembering-rwandan-genocide-109980 Protests continue in Ukraine http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-02-03/protests-continue-ukraine-109626 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Ukraine photo.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>President Viktor Yanukovych returned to work in Ukraine on Monday after taking a four-day sick leave. Despite his absence, protesters continued to demand his resignation. We&#39;ll get an update from Kiev.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-ukraine-s-protests-continue/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-ukraine-s-protests-continue.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-ukraine-s-protests-continue" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Ukraine's protests continue" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 03 Feb 2014 10:41:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-02-03/protests-continue-ukraine-109626 NSA roundup and UN intervention in the Democratic Republic of Congo http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-02/nsa-roundup-and-un-intervention-democratic-republic-congo-107928 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP195268182531 (1).jpg" alt="" /><p><p>DER SPIEGEL senior Washington correspondent Gregor Peter Schmitz elaborates on the magazine&#39;s recent reports on NSA spying. Friends of the Congo&#39;s Kambale Musavuli discusses what impact UN troops can have in the Democratic Republic of Congo.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F99409587&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-nsa-roundup-and-un-intervention-in-the-d.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-nsa-roundup-and-un-intervention-in-the-d" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: NSA roundup and UN intervention in the Democratic Republic of Congo" on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Tue, 02 Jul 2013 11:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-02/nsa-roundup-and-un-intervention-democratic-republic-congo-107928 Global Activism: Elizabeth Powley delivers secondary education to kids in Burundi and Rwanda http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-elizabeth-powley-delivers-secondary-education-kids-burundi <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Every%20Child%20little%202.jpg" title="(Courtesy of Elizabeth Powley/Every Child is My Child)" /></div><p>It&rsquo;s time for our&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism" target="_blank">Global Activism</a></em> series. Each Thursday, we hear about a person who&rsquo;s decided to work to make the world a better place.</p><p>And former high school teacher, Elizabeth Powley, believes that &ldquo;every child has the right to learn.&rdquo; And she has a special love for the children of Africa&rsquo;s Great Lakes region. Elizabeth is founder of <a href="http://www.everychildismychild.org/">Every Child is My Child</a>, an all-volunteer non-profit organization that funds education for children in Burundi and Rwanda. And she envisions a world in which &ldquo;every girl and boy in Africa has access to secondary school.&rdquo;</p></div><p>Elizabeth is also very busy as executive director of Heartland Alliance International, and they&rsquo;re part of <a href="http://www.heartlandalliance.org/">Heartland Alliance</a>, the Chicago-based group that for well over a century has helped endangered populations &mdash; particularly the poor, the isolated, and the displaced.</p><p><strong>Elizabeth Powley shares how her group is making a difference:</strong></p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">More than 70% of the students we&rsquo;re working with are the first in their families to go beyond 6th grade. When they graduate, more than 90% of them will be first in their families to graduate from high school.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">By guaranteeing that all qualified students from a partner community can get a secondary education, we are changing the way children and their families plan for and envision their future. Families can redirect limited resources to other needs (housing, food, agriculture). Children can relax and study, knowing that their scholastic efforts will bring results. Communities will see an entire generation of students educated &ndash; for the first time &ndash; beyond the elementary school level.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">We&rsquo;re creating a community-based model that we hope will advance the policy conversation about education in Africa from &ldquo;universal primary&rdquo; to &ldquo;universal secondary.&rdquo; Rwanda is already headed in that direction; it recently made &ldquo;basic 9&rdquo; the new standard. We&rsquo;d like to be a part of a movement that sees all of Africa adopt &ldquo;basic 12&rdquo; as the new standard.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">Since 2007, we&rsquo;ve funded hundreds of years of secondary education. Graduates of Ngenda, Nyacyonga, and Mageyo are now studying at secondary schools (boarding schools) all over Rwanda and Burundi. In just a couple years, the first class from Mageyo School that Every Child started with will be graduating high school.</p></p> Thu, 06 Dec 2012 12:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-elizabeth-powley-delivers-secondary-education-kids-burundi College president who hired Rwandan professor accused of genocide tries to uncover truth http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-08/college-president-who-hired-rwandan-professor-accused-genocide-tries-uncover-truth <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP10090611527.jpg" title="The president of Rwanda Paul Kagame, raises his hand as he takes oath of office , during his inauguration in Kigali, Rwanda, Monday, Sept. 6, 2010. (AP/John Liebenberg)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">When the <a href="http://scholarrescuefund.org/pages/intro.php">Scholar Rescue Fund</a> suggested that Leopold Munyakazi, a former political prisoner in his native Rwanda, come to Maryland to teach French at <a href="http://www.goucher.edu/" target="_blank">Goucher College</a> in 2008, the school president Sanford Ungar welcomed him with open arms, thinking it would boost Goucher&rsquo;s liberal arts bona fides.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p>In a <a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/leopold-munyakazi-goucher-2012-7/" target="_blank">recent article</a> for <em>New York </em>magazine, Ungar writes that bringing academics like Munyakazi was an &ldquo;increasingly fashionable way for colleges and universities to give shelter to intellectuals from around the globe threatened by government repression, civil strife, war or the pinch of intellectual and political cultures less accommodating than their own.&rdquo;</p><p>He continues: &ldquo;We flattered ourselves that we had done that rare thing, a purely good deed, striking a blow for the cause of intellectual freedom while bringing an honorable man to campus.&rdquo;</p><p>To be sure, Munyakazi brought attention to the school but of a different kind: He was arrested and accused of links to the Rwandan genocide of 1994. The allegations caused a <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,488764,00.html" target="_blank">minor media storm</a> four years ago, including, notoriously, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/11/business/media/11network.html?pagewanted=all">NBC</a>.</p><p>Munyakazi strongly denies any wrongdoing. No formal charges have ever been filed, but he lost his job at Goucher over the controversy. While he remains in Maryland, Munyakazi has struggled to make ends meet ever since.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F55515512&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Today on <em>Worldview, </em>Ungar shares his quest to uncover the truth about Leopold Munyakazi and examines what his case says about the murky politics of genocide.</p><p>Incidentally, before he became Goucher&rsquo;s president, Ungar ran the government news agency Voice of America. In 2001, he met with Rwandan officials to bring VOA content to the country&rsquo;s airwaves. The experience left him with the impression that the Paul Kagame government had healed the country.</p><p>After investigating Munyakazi&#39;s background, he&rsquo;s less certain. Kagame has severely curtailed freedom of the press. People that don&rsquo;t strictly adhere to his government&rsquo;s line on the genocide often end up behind bars.</p><p>Ungar says that even the term &ldquo;genocide&rdquo; is tricky. While Ungar certainly doesn&rsquo;t dispute that Hutus massacred Tutsis in 1994, the designations themselves are arbitrary. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s like saying people on the North Side of Chicago are Hutu and people on the South Side are Tutsi.&rdquo;</p><p>His four-year obsession has led him to muse about the nature of humanitarianism and whether you ever can do something uncomplicatedly good. &ldquo;Reluctantly, I&rsquo;m coming to the conclusion that there are always complications,&rdquo; he said.</p></p> Tue, 07 Aug 2012 11:45:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-08/college-president-who-hired-rwandan-professor-accused-genocide-tries-uncover-truth Exiled Chief of Staff to Rwandan president Paul Kagame on the regime http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-07/exiled-chief-staff-rwandan-president-paul-kagame-regime-81909 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//102552207.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>As waves of revolt across North Africa bring under scrutiny U.S. support for dictators for the sake of stability, many argue not enough attention is paid to other parts of Africa.Observers argue that in other parts of the continent, U.S. support for so called &ldquo;strong-man&rdquo; regimes have produced bad policy outcomes and weakened U.S. influence in the region.</p> <div><a href="http://www.luc.edu/politicalscience/pdfs/vitae/Endless_Website_Vita.pdf">Brian Endless</a> is a senior advisor to the <a href="http://hrrfoundation.org/">Hotel Rwanda Rusesabagina Foundation</a>&nbsp;and a political science professor at Loyola University-Chicago. Theogene Rudasingwa was Chief of Staff to Rwanda&rsquo;s President Paul Kagame and served as Rwanda's Ambassador to the U.S. He now lives in exile in the United States. Rudasingwa believes the so called Rwandan &ldquo;Miracle&rdquo; is a myth. He brings a rare insiders glimpse into the Kagame regime. Theogene says he left the Kagame regime because of a crisis of conscience.</div></p> Mon, 07 Feb 2011 18:14:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-07/exiled-chief-staff-rwandan-president-paul-kagame-regime-81909