WBEZ | food safety http://www.wbez.org/tags/food-safety Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Sometimes meat is worth the risk http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-04/sometimes-meat-worth-risk-106788 <p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/sollysbutterburger.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Original Solly cheeseburger with sirloin patty, butter, stewed onions, and American cheese at Solly's Grille in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image ">And the losers are: ground beef and chicken. Those are the meats most likely to make you sick with severe foodborne illness cased by bacteria according to a study released today by the <a href="https://twitter.com/CSPI"><u>Center for Science in the Public Interest</u></a>. The non-profit advocate for nutrition, health, and food safety&nbsp;reviewed more than 33,000 cases of foodborne illness over a 12 year period.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">Of course this is a complex issue with infinite variables. It starts at your meat source and ends at your plate.</div><div class="image-insert-image "><p>How can you reduce your risk? (Other than not eating ground beef or chicken.) CSPI senior food safety attorney Sarah Klein recommends safe food handling and a thermometer.</p><p>I recommend the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002GIZZWM?ie=UTF8&amp;creativeASIN=B002GIZZWM&amp;tag=lklchu-20"><u>Thermapen on the high end ($96)</u></a> and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000A3L614?ie=UTF8&amp;creativeASIN=B000A3L614&amp;tag=lklchu-20"><u>ProAccurate Large Dial on the low ($8.99)</u></a>.</p>Most importantly wash your hands, but not your meat. Even the <a href="http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/basics/clean/"><u>USDA says so</u></a>. By the time you&#39;ve cooked your food to <a href="http://www.foodsafety.gov/blog/meat_temperatures.html"><u>the recommended temperatures</u></a>, you&#39;ve killed the bacteria that might make you sick.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">But the meats least likely to make you sick: chicken nuggets, sausage, and ham.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&quot;<a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086200/quotes?item=qt0411699"><u>Sometimes you just gotta say &#39;what the heck.&#39;</u></a>&quot;</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&mdash; <em>Risky Business</em>, Joel&#39;s father</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Follow Louisa Chu <a href="https://twitter.com/louisachu"><u>@louisachu</u></a>.</em></div><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/sollysbutterspread.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Solly's Grille in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (WBEZ/Louisa Chu)" /></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 23 Apr 2013 09:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu/2013-04/sometimes-meat-worth-risk-106788 A look at how Japan’s food industry is recovering a year after deadly tsunami and nuclear disaster http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-02-06/look-how-japan%E2%80%99s-food-industry-recovering-year-after-deadly-tsunami-and- <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/segment/photo/2012-February/2012-02-06/japan2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>It's been about a year since a devastating tsunami -- and an ensuing nuclear disaster -- hit Japan. Since then, the country's food supply has been under intense scrutiny, with radiation levels in some foods spiking far beyond government safety limits.</p><p>Today, on our occasional <a href="http://www.wbez.org/foodmondays" target="_blank"><em>Food Mondays</em></a> segment, <em>Worldview</em> talks to WBEZ food blogger <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/louisa-chu" target="_blank">Louisa Chu</a>. She just returned from a government sponsored trip to Japan’s east coast. While in Japan, Louisa visited some of the areas hardest hit by the tsunami and nuclear disaster. Louisa tells <em>Worldview</em> how the country's food industry is recovering from disaster.</p></p> Mon, 06 Feb 2012 15:57:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2012-02-06/look-how-japan%E2%80%99s-food-industry-recovering-year-after-deadly-tsunami-and- Worldview 9.22.11 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-92211 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/episode/images/2011-september/2011-09-22/libya1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>While other countries rallied to support Libya’s Transitional National Council, South Africa remained conspicuously quiet. Only this week did the government officially recognize the TNC. We talk to journalist James Kirchick who says the reluctance was, in part, due to the country’s fondness of Muammar Qaddafi. Also, this year, women around the world are taking to the streets – sometimes in their bras and underwear – as part of the "SlutWalk" protest movement. We talk to writer Zama Ndlovu, who says “SlutWalks” seem unproductive, and culturally insensitive, in her native South Africa. Lastly, we look at China, where food safety is a serious issue. Deaths from poisonous pet food and baby milk once dominated the headlines. We speak with Minxu Zhang, a Chinese student at Lake Forest College, who was in her home country this summer to establish a direct line of purchase between Chinese organic farmers and consumers.</p></p> Thu, 22 Sep 2011 14:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/episode/worldview-92211 FDA And Food Safety: Always Something To Chew On http://www.wbez.org/story/2011-05-05/fda-and-food-safety-always-something-chew-86112 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/0" alt="" /><p><p>At a time when President Obama has asked federal agencies to <a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703396604576088272112103698.html">scale back</a> on imposing new regulations, the Food and Drug Administration seems to be moving full steam ahead, at least on food safety.</p><p>The FDA issued two new <a href="http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm253983.htm">rules</a> asserting its authority over the safety of the food supply yesterday. It's also one of the only agencies that has successfully fought off budget cuts in recent <a href="http://strengthenfda.org/2011/04/30/just-the-time-for-a-little-speculation/">battles</a> on Capitol Hill.</p><p>And, as if to underscore the food safety challenge, a recall of grape tomatoes found at major <a href="http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/05/more-grape-tomatoes-recalled/">supermarket chains</a> has just been expanded to include some 22,000 pounds of <a href="http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_033_2011_Release/index.asp">ready-to-eat salads</a> on suspicion of salmonella contamination.</p><p></p><p>While the U.S. Department of Agriculture has authority over meat, the FDA oversees the safety of just about every other kind of food. And it has to work with state and local agencies, who do much of the actual inspecting.</p><p>In a time of austere budgets, the FDA has been asked to shift its food safety system from one that's reactive to one that's preventive under the new <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2010/12/22/132255747/president-to-sign-food-safety-bill-into-law-now-what">Food Safety Modernization Act</a>. And it has been repeatedly <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2010/06/08/127557388/fda-faulted-for-failing-on-food-safety">hammered</a> for not being up to the job. To get there, it's going to take some dough, says FDA Deputy Commissioner for Foods <a href="http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/CentersOffices/OC/OfficeofFoods/ucm196721.htm">Mike Taylor</a>.</p><p>The agency's 2012 budget request would increase resource for food safety by about $183 million, building on the $1 billion the FDA has for its entire food program, including initiatives on labeling, another <a href="http://www.npr.org/2011/01/25/133218481/New-Food-Labels-May-Be-More-Confusing-Than-Helpful">hot topic</a>.</p><p>"If we got the 2012 request and we got a couple more like it over the next few years,and got our base up to about $1.5 [billion] as opposed to $1.0 [billion], that, in ballpark terms, is what we think it will take," Taylor said at a Washington D.C. <a href="http://events.theatlantic.com/food-summit/2011/">food conference</a> last week.</p><p>The new FDA rules are part of the agency's roll out of the new law. One new FDA rule makes clear the agency's authority to keep food off the market that it suspects to be contaminated, without having to wait around to negotiate with states and the food companies themselves.</p><p>"This authority strengthens significantly the FDA's ability to keep potentially harmful food from reaching U.S. consumers," said Taylor.</p><p>The other rule would require food importers to let the FDA know if other countries have refused to allow their products from entering the country. This could help the agency more quickly identify the riskiest imports, the agency says, at a time when imported food accounts for at least <a href="http://www.ers.usda.gov/amberwaves/february08/datafeature/">15 percent</a> of the food consumed in this country.</p><p>Both rules take effect July 3. Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit <a href="http://www.npr.org/">http://www.npr.org/</a>.<img src="http://metrics.npr.org/b/ss/nprapidev/5/1304614628?&gn=FDA+And+Food+Safety%3A+Always+Something+To+Chew+On&ev=event2&ch=103537970&h1=food+safety,Policy-ish,salmonella,FDA,Shots+-+Health+Blog,Health,Your+Health,Food,U.S.,Home+Page+Top+Stories,News&c3=D%3Dgn&v3=D%3Dgn&c4=136017558&c7=1128&v7=D%3Dc7&c18=1128&v18=D%3Dc18&c19=20110505&v19=D%3Dc19&c20=1&v20=D%3Dc20&c31=133490675,133188445,129287928,129287924,103537970&v31=D%3Dc31&c45=MDA0OTc2MjAwMDEyNjk0NDE4OTI2NmUwNQ001"/></p></p> Thu, 05 May 2011 11:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/2011-05-05/fda-and-food-safety-always-something-chew-86112 Consumers Claim Safeway Failed To Tell Them About Food Recalls http://www.wbez.org/story/business/2011-02-04/consumers-claim-safeway-failed-tell-them-about-food-recalls-81769 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/grocerycards_wide_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>If you think those shopper loyalty cards weighing down your wallet or key chain are only good for special discounts, you've overlooked a completely different sort of potential benefit.</p><p>Those colorful bits of bar-coded plastic also give stores a way to <a href="http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_15264783">track your purchases</a> that can help <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/montevideo/">federal investigators</a> hunt down the source of foodborne illness. And they can be used by the retailers to quickly let you know if food you bought has been recalled.</p><p>But there are broad differences among stores on how they use the cards to shore up food safety. And two consumers, backed by the <a href="http://cspinet.org/new/201102022.html">Center for Science in the Public Interest</a>, are putting <a href="http://shop.safeway.com/superstore/default.asp?brandid=1&page=corphome&cmpid=kw_ecom_swy_ongo_free">Safeway</a>'s Club Card to the test.</p><p></p><p>They filed a <a href="http://cspinet.org/new/pdf/safeway_complaint.pdf">lawsuit</a> Wednesday in a California court alleging that <a href="http://shop.safeway.com/superstore/default.asp?brandid=1&page=corphome&cmpid=kw_ecom_swy_ongo_free">Safeway</a> failed to notify them about tainted peanut butter and eggs they bought, despite having access to their contact information through their club cards.</p><p>One mom, Dee Hensley-Maclean of Montana, bought peanut butter crackers and cookies from Safeway that were part of a nationwide recall of products tainted with salmonella. She says Safeway never contacted her about them.</p><p>"If Safeway knows that there is a problem, and they know how to get in touch with me, quite frankly I'm astonished that they wouldn't try to spare me or my children from a preventable foodborne illness," she says in a statement released by CSPI.</p><p>How did Hensley-Maclean find out about the recall? She bought some similar snacks at <a href="http://www.costco.com/">Costco</a>, which contacted her through her membership card.</p><p>(Hensley-Maclean is no relation to our blogger <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2011/02/01/133407592/scott-hensley-your-host-on-shots">Scott Hensley</a>, although he is prone to talking up his latest Costco finds around the office.)</p><p>A Safeway spokeswoman declined to discuss the details of the specific case, but said that company does notify customers about serious recalls in a variety of ways. "As a policy we do and have used club card data to contact customers," spokeswoman Teena Massingill tells Shots.</p><p>One problem, she says, is that not all retailers' shopper cards work the same way. Some, like Safeway's, don't require a contact number, she says. Costco, on the other hand, requires a membership and generally requires people to fork over more personal data.</p><p>Even with adequate access to personal data, the systems don't always work smoothly. Our NPR colleague Cathy Duchamp tells us she purchased some fresh spinach from the local Giant grocery store last Sunday and swiped her shopper loyalty card at checkout.</p><p>She received a robocall from the store, alerting her to a recall of the spinach on Wednesday night. That call came one day after the recall due to listeria contamination was <a href="http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm241088.htm">announced</a> by FDA.</p><p>By then, though, Duchamp's family had already eaten most of the spinach. Luckily, no one got sick. "To me, if they're collecting the information, they should have to use it," she says.</p><p>The new food safety law will require grocery stores to do a <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2010/12/22/132255747/president-to-sign-food-safety-bill-into-law-now-what">better job</a> notifying customers about recalls, and we're betting those shopper loyalty cards will play a big role. Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit <a href="http://www.npr.org/">http://www.npr.org/</a>.<img src="http://metrics.npr.org/b/ss/nprapidev/5/1296829032?&gn=Consumers+Claim+Safeway+Failed+To+Tell+Them+About+Food+Recalls&ev=event2&ch=103537970&h1=food+safety,Safeway,recalls,Your+Health,Shots+-+Health+News+Blog,Health,Food,Business,U.S.,Home+Page+Top+Stories,News&c3=D%3Dgn&v3=D%3Dgn&c4=133461958&c7=1128&v7=D%3Dc7&c18=1128&v18=D%3Dc18&c19=20110204&v19=D%3Dc19&c20=1&v20=D%3Dc20&c31=133490675,133490673,133428625,126567525,103537970,4516989,127414454,127413671,94427042,93559255,127606515,127602855,127602596,103943429&v31=D%3Dc31&c45=MDA0OTc2MjAwMDEyNjk0NDE4OTI2NmUwNQ001"/></p></p> Fri, 04 Feb 2011 07:37:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/business/2011-02-04/consumers-claim-safeway-failed-tell-them-about-food-recalls-81769