WBEZ | Edison Park http://www.wbez.org/tags/edison-park Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en North Side Aldermanic Races http://www.wbez.org/story/bernard-stone/north-side-aldermanic-races <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/3478679048_abba175cf3_b.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated At: 11:00 p.m.</em> There were a number of tight North Side aldermanic contests, with runoffs to follow in April. Among the highlights are a virtual tie in the 46th Ward race to replace retiring Ald. Helen Schiller, and 83-year-old Ald. Bernie Stone will face challenger Debra Silverstein in a runoff, as Stone edged Silverstein by just a few hundred votes.</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 35</strong></p><p>36 of 36 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Rey Colon, (i) 4,451 - 51 percent</p><p>Miguel Sotomayor, 2,174 - 25 percent</p><p>Nancy Schiavone, 2,117 - 24 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 36</strong></p><p>55 of 55 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>John Rice, (i) 6,709 - 48 percent</p><p>Nicholas Sposato, 3,346 - 24 percent</p><p>Jodi Biancalana, 1,964 - 14 percent</p><p>Brian Murphy, 656 - 5 percent</p><p>Thomas Motzny, 650 - 5 percent</p><p>Bruce Randazzo, 628 - 5 percent</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 38</strong></p><p>53 of 53 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Timothy Cullerton, (i) 5,795 - 48 percent</p><p>Tom Caravette, 2,699 - 22 percent</p><p>Bart Goldberg, 945 - 8 percent</p><p>Carmen Hernandez, 723 - 6 percent</p><p>Mahmoud Bambouyani, 704 - 6 percent</p><p>Sheryl Morabito, 672 - 6 percent</p><p>John Videckis, 402 - 3 percent</p><p>Ed Quartullo, 237 - 2 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 39</strong></p><p>47 of 47 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Margaret Laurino, (i) 7,735 - 76 percent</p><p>Mary Hunter, 2,392 - 24 percent</p><p><strong><br />Alderman Ward 41</strong></p><p>56 of 57 precincts - 98 percent</p><p>Mary O'Connor, 5,885 - 30 percent</p><p>Maurita Gavin, 4,890 - 25 percent</p><p>Richard Gonzalez, 1,887 - 10 percent</p><p>Thomas Murphey, 1,718 - 9 percent</p><p>Jim Mullen, 1,650 - 8 percent</p><p>Daniel Lapinski, 1,593 - 8 percent</p><p>Brock Merck, 728 - 4 percent</p><p>John Quinn, 528 - 3 percent</p><p>Barbara Ateca, 353 - 2 percent</p><p>James Schamne, 152 - 1 percent</p><p>George Banna, 134 - 1 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 43</strong></p><p>57 of 59 precincts - 97 percent</p><p>Michele Smith, 5,040 - 37 percent</p><p>Tim Egan, 3,862 - 29 percent</p><p>Charles Eastwood, 1,394 - 10 percent</p><p>Rafael Vargas, 1,219 - 9 percent</p><p>Mitchell Newman, 637 - 5 percent</p><p>Bita Buenrostro, 408 - 3 percent</p><p>Jim Hinkamp, 378 - 3 percent</p><p>Mike Jankovich, 356 - 3 percent</p><p>Carmen Olmetti, 149 - 1 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 45</strong></p><p>53 of 53 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>John Garrido, 5,121 - 32 percent</p><p>John Arena, 3,567 - 23 percent</p><p>Marina Faz-Huppert, 3,065 - 19 percent</p><p>Michael Ward, 1,638 - 10 percent</p><p>Anna Klocek, 1,189 - 8 percent</p><p>Don Blair, 965 - 6 percent</p><p>Bruno Bellissimo, 216 - 1 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 46</strong></p><p>47 of 47 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Molly Phelan, 2,712 - 20 percent</p><p>James Cappleman, 2,706 - 20 percent</p><p>Emily Stewart, 2,018 - 15 percent</p><p>Don Nowotny, 1,591 - 12 percent</p><p>Marc Kaplan, 1,331 - 10 percent</p><p>Michael Carroll, 1,241 - 9 percent</p><p>Scott Baskin, 821 - 6 percent</p><p>Befekadu Retta, 602 - 4 percent</p><p>Diane Shapiro, 458 - 3 percent</p><p>Andy Lam, 186 - 1 percent</p><p>Caitlin McIntyre, 141 - 1 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 47</strong></p><p>51 of 52 precincts - 98 percent</p><p>Ameya Pawar, 8,351 - 51 percent</p><p>Tom O'Donnell, 7,157 - 44 percent</p><p>Matt Reichel, 600 - 4 percent</p><p>Tom Jacks, 342 - 2 percent</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Alderman Ward 48</strong></p><p>53 of 54 precincts - 98 percent</p><p>Harry Osterman, 10,161 - 81 percent</p><p>Philip Bernstein, 716 - 6 percent</p><p>Jose Arteaga, 639 - 5 percent</p><p>Patrick McDonough, 629 - 5 percent</p><p>Steven Chereska, 354 - 3 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 49</strong></p><p>42 of 42 precincts - 100 percent</p><p>Joe Moore, (i) 6,857 - 72 percent</p><p>Brian White, 2,665 - 28 percent</p><p><br /><strong>Alderman Ward 50</strong></p><p>44 of 45 precincts - 98 percent</p><p>Bernard Stone, (i) 4,143 - 37 percent</p><p>Debra Silverstein, 3,763 - 34 percent</p><p>Greg Brewer, 2,095 - 19 percent</p><p>Ahmed Khan, 659 - 6 percent</p><p>Michael Moses, 475 - 4 percent</p><p>Here is a look at some of the aldermanic races WBEZ reporters will be following closely.</p><p><strong>50th Ward</strong></p><p><em>Updated At: 8:40 p.m. </em>&nbsp; Vote tallies show tight races in the 46th and 50th wards on Chicago's North Side, where runoffs appear likely. Candidates in the 46th Ward are vying to replace retiring Ald. Helen Schiller, who represents much of Uptown. Chicago's oldest alderman, 83-year-old Bernie Stone, is fighting to hold onto his seat in the 50th Ward.</p><p>On the city&rsquo;s far North Side, West Ridge residents say this race is about the same issues brought up in past elections: development and beautification of the once-thriving retail corridors on Devon and Western Avenues, as well as building cohesion among the ward&rsquo;s ethnically diverse populations. When incumbent Ald. Bernard Stone declared that he would run again for an eleventh term, the 83-year-old said now was &ldquo;&shy;not the time for change.&rdquo;</p><p>In his last election Stone found himself forced into a runoff. Later, he lost the Democratic Committeeman seat to State Senator Ira Silverstein. In this race, Silverstein&rsquo;s wife, Debra, is running against Stone, as is one-time Stone ally, Michael Moses. Both of those challengers hail from the area&rsquo;s Orthodox Jewish community. Also running are Greg Brewer, an architect who unsuccessfully bid for Stone&rsquo;s seat in the last election, and Ahmed Khan, a young community organizer of Indian-American descent.</p><p><strong>47th Ward</strong></p><p><em>Updated At: 9:06 </em>&nbsp; Ameya Pawar has a slight lead over Tom O'Donnell and two other challengers in the 47th Ward race to replace Ald. Gene Schulter.</p><p>In this ward, 35-year incumbent Gene Schulter dropped his reelection bid in January to make a play for the Cook County Board of Review. That unsuccessful run set up the first wide-open race since the 1970s in this ward that includes Lincoln Square, North Center and Ravenswood. Schulter threw his support behind Tom O'Donnell, a longtime ally who is president of the Ravenswood Community Council. Schulter gave O'Donnell at least $15,000, helping set up a huge money advantage for O'Donnell. He raised more than $100,000 since jumping into the race just over a month ago.</p><p>His biggest competitor is 30-year-old Ameya Pawar, a program assistant at Northwestern University who bills himself as young, savvy and reform-minded. He collected endorsements from both major daily papers, and managed to raise about $30,000 without the backing of an established political organization. Activist Matt Reichel and Northwestern University administrator Tim Jacks are also running for the seat.</p><p><b>46th Ward</b></p><p>This ward is largely contained within the Uptown neighborhood, which entered this election at a crossroads. For years it&rsquo;s been under pressure to preserve a tradition of taking care of the economically and socially underserved. At the same time, young homeowners want to see new businesses that can serve them, and raise their property values.</p><p>Outgoing Ald. Helen Shiller had championed to keep affordable housing in the 46th Ward, and she won her final battle most recently with the creation of the Wilson Yards mixed-use development. The development brought in a Target and an Aldi grocery, but it also included low-income and senior housing. Shiller&rsquo;s decision not to run left the door open to eleven candidates, who have had to delicately address economic development while retaining affordable housing.</p><p><strong>41st Ward</strong></p><p>This ward includes far-Northwest Side neighborhoods like Edison Park, Norwood Park and Edgebrook -- largely white, middle-class areas home to many cops, teachers and city workers. There, the City Council's only Republican, Brian Doherty, gave up a reelection bid for an unsuccessful run for the state legislature. He threw his support behind his longtime administrative aide, Maurita Gavin (who, it so happens, took Alderman Doherty to prom back in the 1970s). She is running on a platform of continuity, promising even to keep largely the same staff.</p><p>She faced a huge field of 10 challengers, including three former or current police officers and a fireman. In contention are Mary O'Connor, a small business-owner and Democratic committeeman, Richard Gonzalez, a police sergeant who has loaned large sums to his campaign, and Thomas Patrick Murphey, an urban planner who nabbed the Chicago Tribune's endorsement. Bread-and-butter issues dominated this campaign, like basic city services and preventing local police from being deployed to other wards. Most candidates promised to fight to uphold the area's &quot;suburb in the city&quot; character, dominated by single-family homes and good schools. Also running for this seat are former police officer Jim Mullen, firefighter Daniel Lapinski, small-business owner James Schamne, police officer Brock Merck, George Banna and Barbara Ateca.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef and Gabriel Spitzer contributed to this story.</em></p><p><br />&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 22 Feb 2011 21:54:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/bernard-stone/north-side-aldermanic-races Are mayoral candidates ignoring racial issues? http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-09/are-mayoral-candidates-ignoring-racial-issues-82030 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Flickr Washington Park.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Earlier this week, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-07/mayor-monday-race-relations-and-what-next-mayor-can-expect-81897"><em>Eight Forty-Eight</em> discussed the current state of race relations in Chicago</a> and what the next mayor should do to address prejudice and segregation. This week&rsquo;s cover story in the <em>Chicago Reader</em> argues that the candidates are spending little to no time on the persistent racial divides in our city.<br /><br />Political editor Steve Bogira took an <a target="_blank" href="http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/chicago-politics-segregation-african-american-black-white-hispanic-latino-population-census-community/Content?oid=3221712">in-depth look</a> at race and class differences across neighborhoods, from Chicago's far South to far North side. He especially zoned in on two neighborhoods&mdash;Edison Park and Washington Park. Bogira joined host Alison Cuddy in studio to share more about what he learned in his reporting.</p><p><em>Music Button: Liftoff, &quot;The Collector&quot;, from the CD&nbsp; Dubbed Out In DC, (ESL)&nbsp; </em></p></p> Wed, 09 Feb 2011 14:34:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-09/are-mayoral-candidates-ignoring-racial-issues-82030