WBEZ | Auburn-Gresham http://www.wbez.org/tags/auburn-gresham Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en A decade on, coaches try to bridge racial divide http://www.wbez.org/series/race-out-loud/decade-coaches-try-bridge-racial-divide-101330 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/stcover.jpg" title="(WBEZ/Bill Healy)" /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F75050192&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>When it comes to race relations, something as simple as a handshake can become a flashpoint. That&rsquo;s what happened about 10 years ago on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side. Two youth basketball coaches &mdash; one white, the other black &mdash; were supposed to shake hands after their teams played. But, when one extended his hand, the other refused. The incident fueled tensions that had the black coach&rsquo;s school withdrawing from the league. For more than a decade, the men held hard feelings about each other. For our series, &ldquo;Race: Out Loud,&rdquo; we invited them to sit down to see if they could reach any sort of reconciliation. But, first, WBEZ&rsquo;s Chip Mitchell spoke with each separately to hear what led to that moment on the court.</p><p>MITCHELL: The African American coach is a guy named Christopher Mallette. In 2001, he headed athletics at St. Sabina in Chicago&rsquo;s Auburn Gresham neighborhood. Mallette wanted to give his flag-football players some tackle experience. And he wanted to give something to St. Sabina players of every sport.</p><p>MALLETTE: Exposure.</p><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;The parish had been mostly black since the 1960s.</p><p>MALLETTE: We just thought, broaden the horizon of players, also the families involved.</p><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;So Mallette proposed that the school join the Southside Catholic Conference. That was a multisport league for grades five through eight. The league&rsquo;s schools &mdash; there were 21 &mdash; they were on the South Side and in a few suburbs nearby. Most of the league&rsquo;s players were white. But Mallette says he didn&rsquo;t expect much resistance to St. Sabina joining.</p><p>MALLETTE: We had every indication that it was a no-brainer. We were a big parish. No issue paying fees and dues and fielding teams and equipment. We&rsquo;re ready to roll.</p><p>FITZGERALD: There was a pride, saying, &lsquo;Hey, St. Sabina wants to join our league.&rsquo;</p><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;Tom Fitzgerald is the white coach. He headed athletics at St. Linus in Oak Lawn, a suburb 15 miles away. That parish included some families who lived near St. Sabina before the neighborhood turned black.</p><p>FITZGERALD: People were saying, &lsquo;Oh, that&rsquo;s great.&rsquo; You felt like, &lsquo;This was the parish that we lived in when we were kids.&rsquo; I thought it was kind of contagious.</p><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;But it wasn&rsquo;t.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/SABINA%20BLDG_0.jpg" style="float: right;" title="Mallette headed athletics at the Faith Community of St Sabina in Chicago's Auburn-Gresham neighborhood. (WBEZ/Bill Healy)" /></div><p>FITZGERALD: I can&rsquo;t identify the source. I can tell you that I did see some unofficial police reports of the crime rate over there in the St. Sabina neighborhood. And they showed some numbers &mdash; between assaults, robberies &mdash; and people are getting nervous now, saying, &lsquo;Well, we&rsquo;re not sending our wives and kids over there&rsquo; &mdash; really concerned for their safety.</p><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;League officials voted 11 to 9 against allowing St. Sabina to join. Fitzgerald cast one of the votes to keep the parish out.</p><p>FITZGERALD: My explanation and rationale behind my vote was that I would not tell people that we would go over to St. Sabina and play and then not show up. To me, that&rsquo;s wrong. And when the vote came in for no the floodgates opened. I could not believe the amount media attention that this received.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/TRIBUNE.jpg" style="float: left;" title="(WBEZ/Bill Healy)" />MITCHELL:&nbsp;Mallette says too much of the attention sided with the white parishes.</div><p>MALLETTE: If your real concern was crime, the crime that was occurring was black-on-black crime. There were no people waiting in their lair here, to jump out of their lair, and rob the families that were coming to play a basketball game.</p><div class="image-insert-image ">MITCHELL:&nbsp;League officials offered compromises. Fitzgerald says he wanted St. Sabina to play at a neutral site for a year or two before hosting games.</div><p><br />FITZGERALD: I honestly felt people would go over there, once the ice was broken. I know how good the people from this neighborhood are &mdash; how genuine and sincere they are. We could have weaned ourselves into a very healthy relationship. But when you force people to go over there, you&rsquo;re going to get resistance.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;St. Sabina rejected the compromise offers. Here&rsquo;s Mallette.<br /><br />MALLETTE: I actually had coaches and athletic directors from other SCC schools, point blank, say, &lsquo;This is about race.&rsquo; And they saw our entrance into the Southside Catholic Conference as an invasion, if you will, of their feeder program to the schools they traditionally went to. I had a coach tell me, &lsquo;I think you&rsquo;re a good guy but you got to understand, at the end of the day, we would rather have Jimmy playing quarterback &mdash; at St. Lawrence or Brother Rice or Marist or wherever &mdash; than Jermaine.&rsquo;<br /><br />FITZGERALD: I said the only way I would consider changing our vote after we had talked about it is if the cardinal called me &mdash; jokingly I said that. Next day, the cardinal calls me at home. I have really put myself in a predicament there.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;The league reversed itself and let St. Sabina in. Many schools gave a warm welcome. But there were flare-ups. At one game, some white parents had it out with St. Sabina&rsquo;s pastor. He&rsquo;s an outspoken white priest named Michael Pfleger. After another game, a St. Sabina player accused a kid on the other team of calling him the N-word. And there was the handshake incident. Fitzgerald says Mallette had refused to shake his hand after a league meeting months earlier.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: I&rsquo;m just there, like, &lsquo;You know Chris? Two can play this game.&rsquo;<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;Fitzgerald waited until the two faced off as basketball coaches and the game ended.</p><div class="image-insert-image ">FITZGERALD: The players line up first, then the coaches.</div><br /><br /><p>MALLETTE: You greet the opposite coach.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: A handshake is just a sign of respect.<br /><br />MALLETTE: You joke back and forth a little bit.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: It&rsquo;s just truly about sportsmanship.<br /><br />MALLETTE: It&rsquo;s just part of the fraternity of coaches and part of what you do.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: I was the last one in line. I shook all the kids&rsquo; hands. I shook his assistant coach&rsquo;s hand. And he extended his hand. I just went up to him, kind of got close, put my hand on his shoulder. I congratulated him about a good game but I refused to shake his hand.<br /><br />MALLETTE: And I called, &lsquo;Coach! Coach!&rsquo; I think he looked over his shoulder and kept going.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: I made sure that I did not make a spectacle out of it.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/LINUS.jpg" style="float: right;" title="(WBEZ/Bill Healy)" />MALLETTE: The kids from St. Sabina saw that. You know what? I&rsquo;m sure the kids from St. Linus saw that also. I know the parents from St. Sabina saw it and they were sitting in the stands right next to the parents from St. Linus.</div><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;The St. Sabina parents eventually decided they&rsquo;d had enough. Just before the playoffs, they voted to pull their school out of the league. They said it was a matter of protecting their integrity. But the whole experience left Fitzgerald feeling burned.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: I&rsquo;ll tell you, the people who know me and the people I represented backed me up. And that meant more to me than anything else.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;He dabs his eyes.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: You know, I&rsquo;m not a racist. And I&rsquo;m just like, &lsquo;God, that&rsquo;s just mean.&rsquo; Discrimination is not right. Being a racist isn&rsquo;t right. But I&rsquo;m being accused of something that I&rsquo;m furthest from being. And that bothered me.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;Despite the feelings, the coaches never saw fit to speak with each other about why they didn&rsquo;t shake hands &mdash; and about why the effort to put St. Sabina in the Southside Catholic Conference failed. More than 10 years passed. This summer we invited them to sit down together.<br /><br />MITCHELL (on scene):&nbsp;Thanks so much to both of you for agreeing to talk.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;The conversation lasted almost two hours. Christopher Mallette said his players &mdash; the St. Sabina kids &mdash; he said they learned something from playing the white teams that season.<br /><br />MALLETTE: None of our kids could sincerely say they could brand the South Side Irish as racist because they met so many good coaches, so many good parents, principals, nuns, priests. There was an exposure there. You can&rsquo;t stereotype any longer.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: There had to have been a way to make this work .<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;Tom Fitzgerald said race was never the issue for his Oak Lawn parish.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/LINUS%20BLDG_0.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Fitzgerald headed athletics at St. Linus Parish in Oak Lawn, a suburb just southwest of Chicago. (WBEZ/Bill Healy)" />FITZGERALD: I wish the test of time would have had an opportunity to allow St. Sabina to stay in. Unfortunately, some walls were built, intentionally or unintentionally, that prevented us all from trying to get that done.</div><br /><br /><p>MALLETTE: I think what hurt St. Sabina most deeply was that so few, if any, or no people from other parishes who stood up and said, &lsquo;You know what? We&rsquo;re standing with you here.&rsquo; And there&rsquo;s also a sense of nostalgia, I think.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: My parents, I mean, there are people my age who had their first few years of grade school at St. Sabina.<br /><br />MALLETTE: Yeah.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: That whole area over there.<br /><br />MALLETTE: And, if you even look at where the South Side Irish Parade began, it began at St. Sabina.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: Over on 79th Street.<br /><br />MALLETTE: And it went down 79th Street. But you also look at white flight. And when white flight took place and a lot of the South Side folks moved out of those parish communities and moved a little bit further south, a little bit further west. And, at that time, the adults and coaches were kids. They were the kids around the table.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: That&rsquo;s where I was born.<br /><br />MALLETTE: Yeah, &lsquo;Why are we moving?&rsquo; And you&rsquo;re told, &lsquo;Crime.&rsquo; And the only thing that you see is black people moving in so, psychologically, you equate black people with crime.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: Generically I will agree with that comment but it depends upon how you were brought up too.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;Mallette told Fitzgerald the white schools weren&rsquo;t the only ones worried about safety.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/SABINA.jpg" style="float: left;" title="(WBEZ/Bill Healy)" />MALLETTE: I received letters telling us that someone was going to put a bullet into a kid&rsquo;s back when they show up from the Aryan Nation. We were getting all types of things. We were getting phone calls.</div><br /><br /><p>MITCHELL:&nbsp;Mallette also talked about what it was like for St. Sabina people to travel to a white parish.</p><p>MALLETTE: We actually got pulled over, we actually got racially profiled, going to a meeting with the athletic board. And that was the one thing I had mentioned and everyone had laughed and shrugged off, &lsquo;That will never happen.&rsquo; And it was a meeting to talk about our kid being called the N-word at a basketball game. And here you get pulled over and you have citizens come out of their homes, cheering the police on. While myself, the father, the mother and the 13-year-old kid are spread eagle with their hands on the trunk of a car, trying to find this meeting place.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: That&rsquo;s wrong. I didn&rsquo;t walk in your shoes. For everything that you went through that year, those were shoes that were probably very difficult to walk in.<br /><br />MITCHELL:&nbsp;I brought up what happened between the two men on that basketball court &mdash; the handshake that didn&rsquo;t happen. Fitzgerald pointed to Mallette&rsquo;s slight from months earlier. Mallette said he didn&rsquo;t remember it.<br /><br />MALLETTE: If I did shun you there, Tom, I apologize. That shouldn&rsquo;t have happened.<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/BASKETBALL_1.jpg" style="float: right;" title="(WBEZ/Bill Healy)" /><br /><br />FITZGERALD: Nor should I have shunned you back. That&rsquo;s not what I want to teach my sons.<br /><br />MALLETTE: That&rsquo;s really the most important thing is that our kids get better and do better than we do.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: Absolutely.<br /><br />MALLETTE: And I think a large part of that is to see not just all of our successes and all of our trophies and diplomas on the wall but to have honest conversations with our children about where we fell short.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: And maybe shame on some people for not standing by you and saying, &lsquo;Hey, let&rsquo;s try to understand really what&rsquo;s going on here.&rsquo;<br /><br />MALLETTE: Right.<br /><br />FITZGERALD: We missed that opportunity.</p><div class="image-insert-image ">MITCHELL:&nbsp;After talking &mdash; seeing each other for the first time since that basketball season a decade ago &mdash; Tom Fitzgerald and Christopher Mallette got up to leave. They shook hands and said goodbye.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 01 Aug 2012 10:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/race-out-loud/decade-coaches-try-bridge-racial-divide-101330 Venture: Housing group faces a changed world http://www.wbez.org/story/venture-housing-group-faces-changed-world-93796 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-November/2011-11-07/for sale 350 down WBEZ Ashley Gross.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The boogeyman haunting the U.S. economy is the housing market, and on Thursday, we get the latest foreclosure numbers. Realtors, construction workers, mortgage brokers have all had to reinvent themselves since the housing bust.</p><p>But what if you’re a housing non-profit devoted to helping people achieve homeownership? Their world has been turned upside-down and they’re having to press the restart button, too.</p><p>Deborah Moore has worked for Neighborhood Housing Services of Chicago for 14 years. She walks down the 7700 block of South Throop Street in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood, visibly proud of this block, which Neighborhood Housing Services and the state, the city and other groups worked to turn into a model of green construction back in 2005.</p><p>NHS overhauled two brick bungalows here – we’re talking geothermal energy, carpet made out of recycled soda bottles, that kind of thing. NHS advised the homebuyers and lent them the money and, Moore says, produced at least one devoted environmentalist.</p><p>"At first he wasn’t really into all of the green stuff," Moore said. "Then he started really studying the geothermal, then he started calling us telling us we didn’t put it deep enough."</p><p><img alt="Deborah Moore in front of a bungalow NHS rehabbed using green building methods (" class="caption" height="337" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-November/2011-11-06/deborah pic small 2.jpg" title="Deborah Moore in front of a bungalow NHS rehabbed using green building methods (WBEZ/Ashley Gross)" width="600"></p><p>Fast-forward six years and while the block isn’t decimated, it’s not really thriving either. Next door to the geothermal house is an empty lot. Moore says nearby St. Sabina Church planned to build there, and then shelved the idea. Next to that is a vacant house that looks like a foreclosure, and yet another one a couple doors down. Moore says it’s hard for her to look at this street without feeling discouraged.</p><p>"This is the kind of revitalization that we were doing in the late '90s and the early 2000s that just got halted, and now we’re just trying to hold everything where it is until such time that we can start to rebuild again," Moore said.</p><p>Ed Jacob says it feels like the organization is playing defense now instead of offense.</p><p>He took over as the head of Neighborhood Housing Services last year. Talk about a big job to jump into – his predecessor Bruce Gottschall had been there since NHS started in 1975 as a group dedicated to lending in neglected neighborhoods. And the housing crisis meant blocks NHS had worked hard to turn around were slipping backward again. And NHS traditionally offered counseling to help people buy homes – but not that many people out there can these days, especially in the South and West Side areas NHS serves. A lot of people are out of work or have bad credit from foreclosures stemming from subprime loans.</p><p>How has all of this changed what NHS does these days?</p><p>"We’re not in a position to tackle the toughest building on the toughest block, where five years ago we would have been able to do that," Jacob said.</p><p>He says NHS has shifted a lot of its resources from working with new first-time homebuyers to helping people stay in their homes through foreclosure assistance. But he says that takes a big toll on his staff.</p><p>"It’s much tougher on our housing counselors," Jacob said. "Five years ago they were sharing a moment of joy with a family as they got the keys to the home. Now they’re sitting down with people who in some cases are not in a position to stay in their home."</p><p><img alt="Vacant buildings line this block in West Humboldt Park, an area NHS is focused o" class="caption" height="337" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-November/2011-11-06/west humboldt park vacant bldgs.jpg" title="Vacant buildings line this block in West Humboldt Park, an area NHS is focused on (WBEZ/Ashley Gross)" width="600"><br> <br> But housing counseling is just one part of what NHS does. The organization lends money and also develops and rehabs homes.</p><p>"Anybody who’s been a lender in the last five years in our neighborhoods, anybody who’s been a developer in the last five years in our neighborhoods, and any non-profit in our neighborhoods in the last five years has been in a challenging environment," Jacob said. "We hit the trifecta. We’re all three of those."</p><p>So what do you do? Just like lots of for-profit companies and other non-profits, NHS is having to adapt to this topsy-turvy world. Their lending has shrunk by half since 2007. But they prevented 655 foreclosures this year - seven times as many as in 2007.</p><p>Still, Jacob says they need to figure out new ways to achieve their mission of revitalizing hard-hit neighborhoods. With that task ahead of him, what keeps him up at night?</p><p>"The fact that this is going on a lot longer than any of us thought it would and that it’s deeper," Jacob said. "We have got to make changes and adjust based on that and that’s very difficult for any organization to do. The reason I took this position is because if you want to have an impact in the housing market in Chicago there is no more important organization than NHS, but this is the most challenging time in NHS’s history, in our 35-year history, and it scares me that we may not have hit bottom yet."</p><p>As for what NHS plans to do differently, Jacob says they're facing the fact there won't be enough owner-occupants to buy all the vacant homes in Chicago.</p><p><img alt="NHS says buyers are hard to find for houses like this one in West Humboldt Park " class="caption" height="337" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-November/2011-11-06/for sale 350 down.jpg" title="NHS says buyers are hard to find for houses like this one in West Humboldt Park (WBEZ/Ashley Gross)" width="600"><br> <br> "We have got to figure out a strategy to work with good investor owners," Jacob said. "It’s a change in strategy that we now accept the fact we have to figure out how are we going to lend to investor owners, how are we going to work with small investor owners on the property management side with issues of tenant screening. We are never going to occupy all the vacant buildings we have in the city of Chicago with owner-occupants."</p><p>So it’s a work in progress, this reinvention of NHS. But Ed Jacob says he’s inspired by his employees who remain optimistic they’ll succeed in turning communities around, block by block, eventually.</p><p>"You’ve got to find hope in the people who live on the blocks and the people you’ve been working with," he said. "You’ve got to find hope in that, because you’re not going to find it in the statistics, the real estate statistics every month."</p></p> Mon, 07 Nov 2011 06:12:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/venture-housing-group-faces-changed-world-93796 Emanuel announces foreclosure stabilization program http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-announces-foreclosure-stabilization-program-90710 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-August/2011-08-17/001.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel Wednesday announced a new foreclosure initiative that relies on community groups to identify abandoned properties.</p><p>Standing in front of a rehabbed bungalow home in the Auburn-Gresham neighborhood, Emanuel laid out details for what the city calls the Micro-Market Recovery Program.</p><p>The MacArthur Foundation will provide up to $20 million in loans with the idea of leveraging millions more from the private sector. The goal is to collect a total pool of $50 million. The city will select neighborhood groups to find foreclosed properties. Those groups will use the funds to purchase and then rehab the homes, thus making them market-ready.</p><p>“It needs a comprehensive, integrated approach rather than home by home because the system is too big and too complicated for that alone. So we are targeting our resources, both public and private and nonprofit,” Emanuel said.</p><p>The mayor said the program should get about 2,000 homes back on line within three to five years.</p><p>Housing and Economic Development Commissioner Andrew Mooney said local groups can purchase the foreclosed properties by using the pooled startup money.</p><p>“The idea is straight forward. If we’re really going to address the problem, we have to focus on local markets rather than one building at a time. We need to target our resources to help stabilize values, regenerate market forces and reoccupy foreclosed properties,” Mooney said.</p><p>The city will start the program in nine neighborhoods: Humboldt Park, Chatham, Chicago Lawn, West Woodlawn, Auburn Gresham, West Pullman, Belmont Cragin, Englewood and Grand Boulevard.</p><p>Stan Smith, president of the nonprofit New Pisgah Community Service Organization, was on hand for Mayor Emanuel’s announcement. Smith said his group hired local construction workers to rehab the bungalow that hosted the mayor, his staff and the press.</p><p>Smith said he’d like to participate in the new foreclosure program because in the past &nbsp;he received federal dollars to do rehab work, but that work was only piecemeal.</p><p>“We need to do a whole area, capture an area to focus in on it so you don’t end up doing one house here and you have 12 more abandoned houses on the block,” Smith said.</p></p> Thu, 18 Aug 2011 10:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/emanuel-announces-foreclosure-stabilization-program-90710 Chicago mayoral candidate Patricia Van Pelt-Watkins http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-14/chicago-mayoral-candidate-patricia-van-pelt-watkins-82296 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Watkins Hudzick.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>It's just eight days until the Feb. 22 municipal election. And if you want to vote early, there's only three more days to fill out a ballot. Last week <em>Eight Forty-</em> kicked off its one-on-one interviews with the candidates for mayor. Host Alison Cuddy sat down with Miguel Del Valle and Carol Moseley Braun. This week she&rsquo;ll speak with Rahm Emanuel, William &ldquo;Dock&rdquo; Walls and Gery Chico. On this<a target="_blank" href="http://www.wbez.org/series/mayor-monday"> <em>Mayor Monday</em></a>, it's <a target="_blank" href="http://www.patriciaforchicago.com/index.php">Patricia Van Pelt-Watkins</a> turn.<br /><br />Watkins calls herself an advocate for the disadvantaged. She was born and raised in Chicago. She lived in Cabrini Green and struggled with drugs early in her life. Later she earned a Ph.D. while raising her family. Watkins went on to co-found the 300-member Ambassadors of Christ Church in Chicago&rsquo;s Auburn-Gresham neighborhood. She&rsquo;s also a founder of the <a target="_blank" href="http://targetarea.org/">Target Area Development Corporation</a>, a group that works on various issues in the community.<br /><br />Listen to the other candidates' interview below. <br /><br />Alison Cuddy hosts a <a target="_blank" href="http://www.cfw.org/Page.aspx?pid=1267">mayoral forum</a> Tuesday about violence against women and LGBTQ at the Chicago-Kent College of Law.</p></p> Mon, 14 Feb 2011 14:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/episode-segments/2011-02-14/chicago-mayoral-candidate-patricia-van-pelt-watkins-82296