WBEZ | Global Activism http://www.wbez.org/tags/global-activism Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Russia's 'Burning of the Delicacies' http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-20/russias-burning-delicacies-112696 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220134307&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Russia bans Western foodstuffs</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>When the EU imposed sanctions on Russia for its actions in Ukraine, Russia hit back with its own set of sanctions. These included a ban on EU foodstuffs, items like Italian prosciutto and French cheeses. In a recent article in Foreign Policy, Julia Ioffe writes that the ban has proved hard to enforce and also opened up opportunities for bribes as people find creative ways around them. Ioffe, a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and columnist at Foreign Policy, joins us to discuss the sanctions and the general state of the Russian economy.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-69f852e3-4c7e-9b8e-4420-2722872f5aa2"><a href="http://twitter.com/juliaioffe">Julia Ioffe</a> is a columnist at <a href="http://twitter.com/ForeignPolicy">Foreign Policy</a> and a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine.</span></em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/220134903&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: ORPHANetwork</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>When a church&rsquo;s high school group went on a trip to Nicaragua in the 1990s, they say they were &ldquo;shocked&rdquo; by the poverty they witnessed. The students then committed to doing what they could to make a difference. As they kept going back to Nicaragua, they left with &ldquo;a high that never went away.&rdquo; To help, they began selling off their personal belongings, including literally, the clothes off their backs. The trips were the genesis of what would become the ORPHANetwork. For Global Activism, we&rsquo;ll talk with the group&rsquo;s executive director, Dick Anderson and Travis Simone, one of those original high-schoolers whose life was changed in Nicaragua. Today, Travis is senior pastor of Williamsburg Community Chapel in Williamsburg, Virginia.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-69f852e3-4c81-36e4-ff70-6f26616c9a52">Dick Anderson is the executive director of <a href="http://twitter.com/ORPHANetwork">ORPHANetwork</a>. </span></em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-69f852e3-4c81-62f9-e4c0-e860d1582e5e">Travis Simone is the</span> senior pastor of Williamsburg Community Chapel, Williamsburg Virginia.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 20 Aug 2015 13:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-20/russias-burning-delicacies-112696 The bigger picture behind 'Cecil the Lion' http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-06/bigger-picture-behind-cecil-lion-112584 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Vince%20O%27Sullivan.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Vince O' Sullivan)" /><br />&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/218093354&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">&#39;Cecil the Lion&#39; and conservation</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>When American dentist, Walter Palmer, hunted and killed &lsquo;Cecil the Lion&rsquo; in Zimbabwe, it became an international media sensation. Gun and hunting advocates have been pitted against animal rights groups like PETA. But many experts see this incident as an opportunity for a larger discussion on what&rsquo;s really endangering lions and other large mammals. We&rsquo; speak with Bruce Patterson, curator of the Integrative Research Center at the Field Museum of Natural History. He specializes in &ldquo;several topics in evolutionary biology, focusing on the diversification, distribution and conservation of mammals. Patterson believes that humans are the greatest danger to lions like Cecil, but for reasons that go well beyond big-game hunting.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-080dedbe-0499-6da1-4d6c-a755e239d2e2">Bruce Patterson is curator of the Integrative Research Center at the <a href="http://twitter.com/FieldMuseum">Field Museum</a>.&nbsp;</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/218093815&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The Dominican Republic is set to deport Haitian-Dominicans</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>In 2013, the Dominican Republic&#39;s (D.R.) Supreme Court ruled that people in the country born between 1929 and 2010 to non-citizen parents did not qualify as Dominican citizens. The decision stripped thousands of people, many of Haitian heritage, of their nationality. The government then passed legislation requiring all undocumented immigrants to either register or face deportation. The Haitian government accuses the D.R. of racial profiling. Chicago area Haitian-American activists are lobbying Illinois lawmakers to take a stand against the deportations. The activists say the Haitian government is committing &ldquo;human rights abuses&rdquo;. We&rsquo;ll look at what local Haitians are doing to draw attention to the issue with Patrick Brutus, head of the Haitian American Professional Network in Chicago and Max Louis, a Haitian American involved in local efforts.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><a href="http://twitter.com/brutusrealtalk">Patrick Brutus</a> is <span id="docs-internal-guid-080dedbe-049b-f49a-7246-078ee93274d7">head of the Haitian American Professional Network in Chicago. </span></em></li><li><em><span>Max Louis is an activist for the Haitian-Dominican cause and </span>an educator. He&rsquo;s half Dominican, half Haitian.</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/218094337&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World History Minute: The legacy of Hiroshima</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>We talk to Professor John Schmidt about the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, which occurred 70 years ago today.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-080dedbe-04a3-70be-f725-6673abbb683a"><a href="http://twitter.com/JRSchmidtPhD">John Schmidt </a>is a historian and the author of &#39;</span>On This Day in Chicago History&#39;.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/218097192&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: Genesis at the Crossroads</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The Genesis Summer Institute, a pilot program of the Genesis Academy for Global Leadership, is a curriculum designed to nurture future global leaders who will work on peace-building. The educational program focuses on four core areas: music and peacebuilding; human rights; peace journalism; and environmental sustainability. The project unites international students and diverse U.S. students for cross-cultural experiences. Students in this year&rsquo;s program come from Northern Ireland, Cambodia, Pakistan, Bosnia and the U.S. Wendy Sternberg, founder and executive director of Genesis at the Crossroads, joins us to talk about the program. Roheena Madni and Asa Mallon, two students taking part in the Institute, join Sternberg to share their experiences.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-080dedbe-04a5-f64d-12e0-49610e12dfa9">Wendy Sternberg is the founder and executive director of <a href="http://twitter.com/GenesisATC">Genesis at the Crossroads</a>. </span></em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-080dedbe-04a6-a068-2a03-9e0db1832472">Roheena Madni is a student in the Genesis Summer Institute from Pakistan. </span></em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-080dedbe-04a6-f67f-5cf3-867eb557b6f2">Asa Mallon is a student in the Genesis Summer Institute from Northern Ireland. </span></em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 06 Aug 2015 14:44:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-06/bigger-picture-behind-cecil-lion-112584 Worldview in India: Jal Bhagirathi and water security http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-india-jal-bhagirathi-and-water-security-111933 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/IMG_0293.JPG" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="A woman carries a bucket with fresh water in Rajasthan, India. (Jerome McDonnell)" /></div><div class="image-insert-image "><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Worldview in India: Jal Bhagirathi Foundation and water security</span></font></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em>Worldview</em>&nbsp;took&nbsp;<em>Global Activism</em>&nbsp;on the road to India! And we continue our visit to India&rsquo;s Rajasthan State, the world&rsquo;s most densely populated desert region, with the first of a two-part conversation with Jal Bhagirathi Foundation. It&rsquo;s an NGO focused on water security. Parikshit singh Tomar of Jal Bhagirathi, will show us their retention basin where they store rainwater. The land reserve has developed into a beautiful ecosystem. Next week, Parikshit will take us to a remote rural village that was revolutionized by Jal Bhagirathi projects.</div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guest:</strong></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-9682de71-e7e8-e514-bbea-7f8d829048fb">Parikshit singh Tomar is the</span> media and communications director for&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/jalbhagirathi">Jal Bhagirathi Foundation,</a> based outside of Jodhpur, India.</em></div></p> Thu, 23 Apr 2015 15:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-india-jal-bhagirathi-and-water-security-111933 Global Activism: Shelley Batra and Operation ASHA http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-shelley-batra-and-operation-asha-111775 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Courtesy of Operation Asha.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-12a7cca4-57bd-fe25-feac-40de5dd974ee">Once thought under control, Tuberculosis (TB) had begun to make a comeback. Incidences were rising around the world, including in developed countries. The trend was so serious, that fifteen years ago, the United Nations set the goal of reversing incidences of infectious diseases like TB by the end of 2015. Tuesday was World TB day and for today&rsquo;s </span>Global Activism, we&rsquo;ll get an update from long-time Global Activist Dr. Shelly Batra. She&rsquo;s founder and president of Operation Asha. It&rsquo;s an NGO that delivers mass treatment of TB to underprivileged populations around the globe.</p></p> Thu, 26 Mar 2015 15:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-shelley-batra-and-operation-asha-111775 Worldview Goes to India: Global Activism-Shanti Bhavan Children's Project http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-goes-india-global-activism-shanti-bhavan-childrens-project-111734 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Shanti Bhavan Girl Goldman Sachs stella.JPG" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33e1-e544-3841-e62f7ad1ab84">Worldview</span> was in India! And we&rsquo;ll take you along for the ride. For nearly twenty years on Worldview, India Development Service (IDS), a Chicago-based investment NGO that invests seed money in service and development projects across India, has brought to Chicago dozens of Global Activists who work in India to make the world a better place. &nbsp;So IDS struck up the idea to bring Worldview to India and talk with these people, on-the-ground, about their work. Nila Vora and Nilesh Kothari of IDS guided us as we bounced around to big cities like, Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore and Hyderabad, as well to remote villages and towns. We met people working to overcome challenges like illiteracy, educating girls, class issues, clean water supply and so much more.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33e1-e544-3841-e62f7ad1ab84">Today we begin with a trip we took to Bangalore in southern India. One of the groups we visited is Shanti Bhavan. &nbsp;It&rsquo;s a school educating underprivileged youth, mostly from the Dalit class, known more popularly as &ldquo;the Untouchables&rdquo;. &nbsp;A documentary film made about the school &nbsp;is called &ldquo;The Backward Class&rdquo;. We spoke with the school&rsquo;s founder, Abraham George, and with a number of students whose lives were transformed by their experiences in Shanti Bhavan.</span></p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33e2-3533-18ce-efc566eb7883">Abraham George is the</span>&nbsp;founder of <a href="https://twitter.com/ShantiBhavan">Shanti Bhavan Children&rsquo;s Project.</a></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33e2-3533-18ce-efc566eb7883">Nila Vora is a&nbsp;</span>founding board member of <a href="http://idsusa.org/">India Development Service</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Thu, 19 Mar 2015 16:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/worldview-goes-india-global-activism-shanti-bhavan-childrens-project-111734 Worldview: The Cricket World Cup gears for the semi-finals http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-19/worldview-cricket-world-cup-gears-semi-finals-111733 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP980926077422_0.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Indians watch the cricket World Cup quarterfinal match between India and Bangladesh at a market in New Delhi, India, Thursday, March 19, 2015. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196702275&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Our overview of the 2015 Cricket World Cup</span></p><p>Outside of the U.S., perhaps the hottest sports conversations taking place right now are about the 2015 Cricket World Cup. &nbsp;As the games head to the &ldquo;knock-out&rdquo; quarterfinals, we&rsquo;ll get analysis about what to expect from Jawad Khan, &ldquo;Chicago cricket enthusiast&rdquo; and&nbsp;<em>Worldview&rsquo;s</em>&nbsp;cricket commentator and Samir Chopra, professor of philosophy at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York (CUNY). He blogs at&nbsp;<em>The Cordon</em>&nbsp;on ESPNcricinfo.com and at samirchopra.com. He&rsquo;s author of the books,&nbsp;<em>Eye on Cricket: Reflections on the Great Game</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Brave New Pitch: The Evolution of Modern Cricket.</em></p><p><strong>Guest:<em>&nbsp;</em></strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-3183e355-33d7-743b-0396-a6ecfc4264f4"><a href="https://twitter.com/mrjkhan">Jawad Khan</a> is the</span> WBEZ Cricket Commentator for Worldview and local cricket player.</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-3183e355-33d7-743b-0396-a6ecfc4264f4"><a href="https://twitter.com/EyeOnThePitch">Samir Chopra</a> is a</span> professor of philosophy at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York. Blogs at <a href="http://www.espncricinfo.com/blogs/content/story/blogs/cordon.html">&lsquo;The Cordon</a>&rsquo; on ESPNcricinfo and at <a href="http://samirchopra.com/">samirchopra.com</a>. Author of </em>Eye on Cricket: Reflections on the Great Game<em> and </em>Brave New Pitch: The Evolution of Modern Cricket.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196703389&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Global Activism: Shanti Bhavan school in India</span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33da-1cd8-2c7d-4a053738638c">Worldview</span> was in India! And we&rsquo;ll take you along for the ride. For nearly twenty years on Worldview, India Development Service (IDS), a Chicago-based investment NGO that invests seed money in service and development projects across India, has brought to Chicago dozens of Global Activists who work in India to make the world a better place. &nbsp;So IDS struck up the idea to bring Worldview to India and talk with these people, on-the-ground, about their work. Nila Vora and Nilesh Kothari of IDS guided us as we bounced around to big cities like, Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore and Hyderabad, as well to remote villages and towns. We met people working to overcome challenges like illiteracy, educating girls, class issues, clean water supply and so much more.</p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33da-1cd8-2c7d-4a053738638c">Today we begin with a trip we took to Bangalore in southern India. One of the groups we visited is Shanti Bhavan. &nbsp;It&rsquo;s a school educating underprivileged youth, mostly from the Dalit class, known more popularly as &ldquo;the Untouchables&rdquo;. &nbsp;A documentary film made about the school &nbsp;is called &ldquo;The Backward Class&rdquo;. We spoke with the school&rsquo;s founder, Abraham George, and with a number of students whose lives were transformed by their experiences in Shanti Bhavan.</span></p><p><span><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33da-ba2a-60e8-dcc5d4d54ecd">Abraham George is a</span> founder of <a href="https://twitter.com/ShantiBhavan">Shanti Bhavan Children&rsquo;s Project.</a></em></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-6d8dc8f2-33da-ba2a-60e8-dcc5d4d54ecd">Nila Vora is a</span> founding board member of <a href="http://idsusa.org/">India Development Service</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/196703807&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">World History Minute: The Northwest Rebellion</span></font></p><p>On March 19, 1885, the North West Rebellion got started in Canada. Historian John Schmidt explains what the fight was all about.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/JRSchmidtPhD">John R. Schmidt</a> is a historian and author of On This Day in Chicago History.</em></p></p> Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-19/worldview-cricket-world-cup-gears-semi-finals-111733 Worldview: Life after conflict for child soldiers of South Sudan http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-02-12/worldview-life-after-conflict-child-soldiers-south-sudan-111554 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1511406_10153016997469002_8693246202494508433_n_2.jpg" style="height: 415px; width: 620px;" title="Last week UNICEF helped secure the release of several hundred child soldiers in South Sudan, one of the largest ever demobilizations of children. (Courtesy of UNICEF/Marinetta Peru)" /></div><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/190818341&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Child soldiers released in South Sudan</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><span id="docs-internal-guid-b1115e12-7fa6-ce39-0852-dbf7d9106b9e">Tuesday, Feb 10 saw the release of several hundred child soldiers in Pibor, South Sudan as part of a peace agreement between warring factions in that country. This comes after a first round of releases back in January with the hope that the total of three thousand children will be released. UNICEF, along with their partner organizations have been overseeing the situation. UNICEF spokeswoman Doune Porter is based in South Sudan and joins us for more.</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em>Doune Porter,&nbsp;Chief of Strategic Communications with <a href="https://twitter.com/UNICEF">UNICEF </a>in South Sudan</em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/190819692&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Winter swimming is more than just a polar bear plunge</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d0d6cc18-7fa9-7a4b-726c-7c005d677ae3">You might have heard about polar bear plunges, but winter swimming is different. It&rsquo;s a serious, competitive sport &nbsp;and it&rsquo;s growing in popularity. &nbsp;Swimmers compete in the cold, in fact, </span>The International Winter Swimming Association requires that the water temperatures must be (41 &deg;F) or below for competitions. In places like Tyumen, Russia, which held a recent competition, temperatures outside can dip to -22F. We&rsquo;ll hear how competitions are structured and find out more about the history of the sport with Melissa O&rsquo;Reilly. She&rsquo;s the 2014 Winter Swimming World Champion in the 450m freestyle and the current female World Record holder in the 1000m freestyle. She&rsquo;s also one of the founding members of the United States Winter Swimming Association. She joins us to tell us more about the sport. &nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-d0d6cc18-7fa9-e6ef-f489-a555c78bccb7"><a href="https://twitter.com/melissa_oreilly">Melissa O&rsquo;Reilly</a> is the </span>&nbsp;2014 Winter Swimming World Champion in the 450m freestyle and the current female World Record holder in the 1000m freestyle. She&rsquo;s also one of the founding members of the <a href="https://twitter.com/USWSA">United States Winter Swimming Association.</a></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/190820466&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">Global Activism: The Dreamfly</span></font></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-26953df0-7fab-a2d6-917d-9a49be6964f6">As Umaimah Mendhro was completing &nbsp;her education in the U.S., she always felt a pull back to her native Pakistan. Her goal was to bring different peoples together and facilitate peace. For </span>Global Activism, Mendhro will &nbsp;tell us the story of why she founded &lsquo;The Dreamfly&rsquo;, a volunteer-powered organization that aims to, &ldquo;create human connections across communities in conflict through education, exposure, and empowerment for a better, unified future.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://twitter.com/umaimah"><span id="docs-internal-guid-26953df0-7fac-186c-cb6b-808a652f42f0">Umaimah Mendhro</span></a>, founder and principal of <a href="https://twitter.com/thedreamfly">Dreamfly</a></em></p></div></p> Thu, 12 Feb 2015 15:11:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-02-12/worldview-life-after-conflict-child-soldiers-south-sudan-111554 Global Activism: 'Mano a Mano' brings supplies and infrastructure to Bolivia http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-mano-mano-brings-supplies-and-infrastructure-bolivia-111434 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA-Mano a mano-CMS.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-00d0ef7f-1239-75c3-d367-d4c1c66b166f">Segundo Velasquez grew up in Bolivia. But when he moved to Minnesota, Segundo&rsquo;s brother Jose, a pediatrician, asked him to bring back medical supplies whenever he came for visits. Soon after, Segundo and his wife, Joan, started the NGO, <a href="http://manoamano.org/">Mano a Mano International Partners</a> to collect surplus medical supplies and equipment for Jose&rsquo;s hospital. Over 20 years later, Mano a Mano&#39;s work has expanded to deliver food and school supplies and build over 300 infrastructure projects throughout Bolivia. Segundo will tell us his story for our </span><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a> series.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/187361302&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em>Joan wrote about the importance of their work in this excerpt from her book, &quot;Gaining Ground, A Blueprint for Community-Based International Development&quot;:</em></p><p>&ldquo;Bolivia has a total population of just over ten million, more than half the people of Bolivia live in deep material poverty. Family incomes average less than a dollar a day. The country&rsquo;s wealth is concentrated in its cities (43.5%) live in poor barrios. Outside the cities it&rsquo;s worse. The same vistas garner rave reviews dictate isolated and economic hardship for many rural Bolivians. Approximately a third of Bolivia&rsquo;s population (an estimated 3.3 million people) reside in rural areas. Of this rural population, more than sixty-five percent do not have sufficient income to cover basic needs. Some rural residents work as miners or artisans, but the vast majority eke out a meager living as subsistence farmers, raising crops and a few domestic animals on one-or-two-acre plots. The climate and terrain present challenges. As a consequence, 37 percent of rural children under age five suffer from chronic malnutrition.&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 22 Jan 2015 09:17:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-mano-mano-brings-supplies-and-infrastructure-bolivia-111434 Global Activism: 'Give Hope, Fight Poverty' helps HIV victims in Swaziland http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-give-hope-fight-poverty-helps-hiv-victims-swaziland-111360 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA-Swaziland.JPG" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-55ad30fc-ca71-7448-d356-c5fe34b22aa5">Getting her PHD led Annie Elbe Todt to the small African country of Swaziland. </span><span id="docs-internal-guid-55ad30fc-ca71-7448-d356-c5fe34b22aa5">It&rsquo;s a country with the highest rate of HIV in the world. Annie began helping some of the orphans and child headed houses she saw all around her. For <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a>, we talk with Todt about her organization <a href="http://www.ifightpoverty.org">Give Hope, Fight Poverty</a>. It supports 33 child headed households. Their network of support extends to 1500 </span>children. They dig wells, build homes and send children to school. A remarkable number of people have joined on service learning trips.</p><p dir="ltr"><em><strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/185104920&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe>EVENT:</strong></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em><a href="http://www.hamburgermarys.com/chicago/bingo.php">Hamburger Mary&rsquo;s &lsquo;HamBINGO&rsquo;</a></em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Sun, January 11, 8pm &ndash; 10pm</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>Andersonville...5400 N. Clark</em></p><p dir="ltr"><em>$15 to play all night. Proceeds go to &lsquo;Give Hope, Fight Poverty&rsquo;</em></p></p> Thu, 08 Jan 2015 09:45:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-give-hope-fight-poverty-helps-hiv-victims-swaziland-111360 Global Activism: Equally Able Foundation provides disability services in India http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-equally-able-foundation-provides-disability-services-india <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/08 Bookstore for muscular dy patient.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Mohammed Yousuf survived polio. It led him to care deeply about empowering people with disabilities in the U.S. and abroad. He started the <a href="http://www.equallyable.org/">Equally Able Foundation</a>, an organization dedicated to providing services in India and other countries to give assistive equipment, education and employment opportunities to disabled individuals. Yousuf joins us to tell us about the foundation and what it&#39;s doing to try to help change the lives of the disabled in India.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/176779688&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Mohammed Yousuf wants to change attitudes toward accepting individuals with disabilities:</p><blockquote><p>From education to providing equipment to creating self-employment, at Equally Able, we have dedicated ourselves to bringing a change in the lives of people with disabilities. We have also tried to find ways to increase inclusion and disability awareness within the communities by organizing workshops and seminars. Because more than the accessible ramps and restrooms, we need welcoming environments and attitudes towards accepting individuals with disabilities.</p><p>Over the years, Equally Able has transformed the lives of thousands of individuals with disabilities around the world. This would not have been possible without the tremendous support of our board of trustees, donors and volunteers. And certainly not without the support and encouragement of my family, my kids and especially my wife, Humera, who is there for me always.</p></blockquote></p> Thu, 13 Nov 2014 11:24:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-equally-able-foundation-provides-disability-services-india