WBEZ | Global Activism http://www.wbez.org/tags/global-activism Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Global Activism: Public policy graduate creates 'Basic Transfer', for a different approach to solving global poverty http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-public-policy-graduate-creates-basic-transfer-different <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/GAS-BAsic Transfer India.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-d06db46c-ba05-4a74-b0e7-5d639a717861">After graduating from the University of Chicago&rsquo;s <a href="http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/">Harris School</a> of Public Policy, Tricia Martinez came to believe that, &ldquo;policy solutions are not driven by potential impact for the individual or the ability to influence large-scale change, rather they are driven by political agendas.&rdquo; She wanted to take a different approach to solving some of the world&rsquo;s biggest humanitarian problems. &nbsp;For <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism">Global Activism</a>, Martinez will tell us about her new collaborative project called &ldquo;<a href="http://www.basictransfer.com/">Basic Transfer</a>&rdquo;. It&rsquo;s a &ldquo;hybrid social venture with a mission to lift women around the world out of poverty through cash transfers.&rdquo;<iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/155117134&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Tricia wants to create a revolution in fighting poverty through technology:</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">&quot;I am a social innovator and builder with a policy lens. Solving problems is what really excites me and I have found that the most critical part of addressing societal challenges is being able to connect and empathize with individuals unlike yourself. However, with a background in public policy, I see that many policy solutions are not driven by potential impact for the individual or the ability to influence large-scale change, rather they are driven by political agendas.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">There is definitely a disconnect between the academic world conducting advantageous research and discovering new ways to solve problems and the real world solutions we actually implement. This is why I founded Basic Transfer. I wanted to take the research that my training was founded on and take it to scale. Poverty has always been the most fascinating phenomenon to me. The fact that 1.3 billion people live off of less than $1.25 a day and 70% of these people are women in the year 2014 is unacceptable, but society can still not figure out how to alleviate it at scale or eliminate it. Cash transfers have the ability to change the poverty landscape completely, but at the end of the day there is a stigma with handing cash to a poor person and giving them the choice on how to live their life. Basic Transfer will change that through our peer-to-peer giving platform, transparent model, and impact metrics showing donors where exactly there money is going and how $25 can create significant impact.</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">We are a poverty alleviation solution driven by research and results and as a social venture we have the ability to innovate and scale without being held back by agendas or institutional constraints. Unconditional cash transfers can lift millions of people out of poverty; it is just about breaking the traditional model and that is exactly what Basic Transfer is going to do.&quot;</p></p> Thu, 19 Jun 2014 08:02:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-public-policy-graduate-creates-basic-transfer-different A humanitarian crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-12/humanitarian-crisis-us-mexico-border-110335 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP646672363735.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>American border control have seen an increase in unaccompanied minors crossing the border from Latin America, creating a growing humanitarian crisis. Adam Isacson, a senior associate for regional security policy with the Washington Office on Latin America, joins us to discuss the issue.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-18/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-18.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-18" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: A humanitarian crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Thu, 12 Jun 2014 13:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-12/humanitarian-crisis-us-mexico-border-110335 Global Activism: Helping the people and ecosystem of Guatemala's cloud forests http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/cloud forest_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><div><a href="http://www.cloudforestconservation.org/">Community Cloud Forest Conservation</a> (CCFC) works to alleviate poverty and protect Guatemala&rsquo;s tropical cloud forests. They support projects that include reforestation, agricultural biodiversity, education and bird monitoring. CCFC also teamed up with local bird conservationists like <a href="http://chicagoregion.audubon.org/">Audobon Chicago Region</a>, to protect the winter homes of birds that migrate between Guatemala and Chicago. For our Global Activism segment, Founder and director Rob Cahill gives us an update on what he calls &ldquo;the great progress&rdquo; his group has made in the last few months.</div><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/152998102&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 11:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-helping-people-and-ecosystem-guatemalas-cloud-forests-110287 Global Activism: Skokie teacher inspires students towards activism http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-skokie-teacher-inspires-students-towards-activism-110250 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/GA-Ghanian kindergarten Photographer Shelley-Nizynski Reese.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d3ade7e0-4848-270e-4c35-6681b77e1479" style="font-size:15px;font-family:Cambria;color:#000000;background-color:transparent;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;text-decoration:none;vertical-align:baseline;">Jennifer Ciok is a Middle School teacher in Skokie, IL. She encourages activism and community in her students. Working with students through her group <a href="http://www.aidingchildrentogether.blogspot.com">Aiding Children Together</a> (ACT), they come up with ideas to help children in Ghana with food, medicine, and education. Ciok says her &ldquo;wonderful and passionate students share a love of helping others and truly making a difference in the world around them.&rdquo; She&rsquo;ll update us on her kids and the help they&rsquo;re giving Global Activist Shelley Nizymski&rsquo;s group A Better Life for Kids&rsquo;&rsquo;, with an upcoming walk-a-thon.</span></p><p style="text-align: center;"><strong><em>5th Annual Change for Change Walkathon</em>:</strong></p><p style="text-align: center;"><em>June 3rd, 2014, 8:00 am</em></p><p style="text-align: center;"><em>Starting from McCracken Middle School, 8000 E Prairie Rd, Skokie, IL<iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/151883561&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></em><strong>Jennifer Ciok&rsquo;s work has had a life-changing effect on her:</strong></p><p><em>&ldquo;Working with students through Aiding Children Together has been such a positive part of my career at McCracken Middle School. I have seen such wonderful and passionate students share a love of helping others and truly making a difference in the world around them. Throughout the year, the group grows as more and more students realize the importance of the impact being made. They can see how they are helping the children in Ghana with food, medicine, and education through the stories and pictures that Shelley Nizynski, founder of A Better Life for Kids, shares with them. They visit Rustic Falls Nature Camp in Burlington, Wisconsin, founded by the Lentz family, to help clean and beautify the grounds to make it a place where children can enjoy nature and get away from the problems they are facing.</em></p><p><em>When we wrote to Congresswoman Schakowsky in 2010 regarding the violation of children&rsquo;s rights around the world, I had no idea that it would grow into such a positive piece of the school community. Starting next year, service learning will be a part of every grade. I tell my students each year to find their passion and act on it, and I truly hope that they will become a generation who will go out and make the world a better place.&rdquo;</em></p><p><em><strong><u>McCracken Students talk about their activism:</u></strong></em></p><p><em><em>--It has been such a tremendous experience...By the fifth meeting or so, I realized that I wasn&rsquo;t</em><em> doing it because my friends were there, I genuinely felt as though I could contribute to something bigger. You are the figurehead of ACT, but you lead in a way that we, as students, feel as though we are making the changes in the world, not just helping to make them happen. I have been so empowered to &ldquo;do good&rdquo; and stick to a club that helps to do so.</em></em></p><p><em><em>--The club ACT has changed my life in so many ways, and I would not be able to say that without</em> <em>the help of one of my teachers, Mrs. Jennifer Ciok. She taught me the ways of helping others</em> <em>and putting others before yourself. I changed my views on life and now think of how thankful I</em> <em>should be for having a house over my head, food to eat, education, and extra things that are not necessarily needed in order to survive.</em></em></p><p><em><em>--I had the opportunity to be a part of ACT, and it was one of the most rewarding, empowering, and special things I ever did. The happiness and joy that I received every time I saw a picture of a child going to school and having a smile on their face was priceless!! These experiences and the lessons that it has taught me are the reasons why I love helping others. I&#39;m so thankful for everything that I have, the love that my family and friends express towards me, the opportunity to have a education, and a roof over my head! One of my biggest dreams is to have the opportunity to travel to Ghana and be able to be the one holding the babies, spreading love, witnessing kids go to school and just being there for the kids! Thank you especially to Ms. Nizynski and Ms. Ciok for inspiring me and many others to reach beyond your world and truly make a difference in someone&#39;s life!!!</em></em></p></p> Thu, 29 May 2014 08:26:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-skokie-teacher-inspires-students-towards-activism-110250 Global Activism: Photojournalist documents Afro-Colombian communities http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-photojournalist-documents-afro-colombian-communities-110252 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/GA-Bracey.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Colombia&rsquo;s African Diaspora population is the third largest in the Americas, after Brazil and the United States, but they endure enormous violence and persecution at the hands of the country&rsquo;s numerous armed factions. The lives of Afro-Colombians are further complicated by decades of civil war and economic interests such as the mining industry, narcotraffickers and large landowners, that fuel more violence.</p><p>Ruth Goring is a board member for <a href="http://colombiavivechicago.org/">Colombia Vive Chicago</a>, an NGO dedicated to human rights in Colombia. She&rsquo;s author of a book of poetry called <em>Yellow Doors</em>. <a href="http://www.mjbphotography.com/">Michael Bracey</a> is a photojournalist and editor of the Africans Within the Americas project. In February 2014, they visited Afro-Colombian neighborhoods in and near Cartagena, Quibdó, Buenaventura, and Medellín. Goring and Bracey join us to fulfill their mission to &ldquo;share the beauty and strength of our Afro-Colombian sisters and brothers through exhibits and presentations in Chicago and beyond.&rdquo;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/147429349&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong>Ruth Goring reflects on the constant danger Afro-Colombians face: </strong></p><p>&ldquo;Our Afro-Colombian-focused trip was fantastic...We met so many internally displaced Afro-Colombians, and the violence that forces people to flee their homes is not really letting up...One compelling woman had been mayor of Jurado in Choco, where she resisted FARC takeover of land and was rewarded with a FARC pipe bomb thrown onto her house; she was displaced to Buenaventura, where she got involved in community leadership and the paramilitary gangs threatened her life. Now she&#39;s taking shelter in Bogota. We met her there, in the SUV with shaded windows...[T]he government provide[d] [these] services because her name has been on Aguilas Negras hit lists.&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 01 May 2014 10:27:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-photojournalist-documents-afro-colombian-communities-110252 Global Activism: Long Grove native advocates for sex education in Africa http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-long-grove-native-advocates-sex-education-africa-110256 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/GA-Afreaka.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Dana deGrazia was so inspired by the work of her sister and Global Activist, Aliya deGrazia (Small Planet, Big Plans), that she started her own NGO, &ldquo;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/AfreakaMovement">Afreaka</a>.&quot; It came from two experiences in Dana&rsquo;s life: her less than adequate experience with sex education in junior high school; and her time as a student in Kenya, where she was &ldquo;shocked&rdquo; from &ldquo;the lack of factual information in all areas of sex education.&rdquo; Afreaka&rsquo;s goal is to &ldquo;provide accurate and unbiased knowledge about sexual health, parenthood and contraception choices to teens and young adults across African generations through urban art and music...&rdquo; Dana joins us to discuss her work.<iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146303042&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe><strong>Dana is passioante about her cause:</strong></p><p><em>I got my first sex education in junior high school and I realized even then that we had a problem. It was full of generalized points and lots of giggling and laughing but not a lot of practical information. I also realized that I was more comfortable than the average person addressing the issues. I took this into other areas in high school such as becoming president of the Gay Straight Alliance and working to have straight and clear conversations about the choices young people are considering. The older I got, the more disappointed I became in the quantity and quality of information, but I was really blown away when I went to Africa. </em></p><p><em>Initially I went to Africa to peruse a degree in International Relations. I have always believed if you are going to work in that field you should spend more than a semester in Spain drinking Sangria. So I moved in with my sister who had an apartment there and was working on her degree. I am now majoring in Criminal Justice and minoring in International Relations. I intend on pursuing a career in international anti-corruption investigations.</em></p><p><em>Living in the community and talking to my peers I was shocked and concerned by the lack of factual information in all areas of sex education. A healthy understanding of both sex and intimacy should not be an oddity for anyone, especially not someone my age. The longer I lived in Kenya, the more I realized that it was an oddity for people. I traced this not only to a lack of unbiased information but to people, even health care professionals, providing sometimes outlandishly inaccurate information.</em></p><p><em>When I first came up with the concept for Afreaka it was actually because I was drawing and I drew a design that I liked and would wear on a piece of clothing, but then I decided I liked a lot of my designs and that if I were going to do something like a clothing line I wanted it to mean more to the world and to make a difference to people. From there the ideas just kept flowing. Although I was born and raised in Illinois I consider Kenya my home as I have lived there since I was 17. Seeing people in the U.S., and in Kenya struggle with conversations about sex and intimacy made me decide that something needed to be done but it needed to be done differently as what we were doing was not working for my generation.</em></p><p><em>My Parents and my sister Aliya, who has been on Worldview twice discussing her work in rural Kenya, are an inspirational and driving force to keep me pushing forward. With their encouragement and support I know Afreaka can break through the walls that separate the generations from having real communication.</em></p><p><em>With a background as the former president of the Gay-Straight Alliance at a top high school, a senior graduate of a world renowned communications program and extensive traveling around Africa I am confident I can, along with a team of committed and energetic musicians, artists and designers, create lasting and revolutionary change in the way sex and intimacy is looked at and talked about with young people today. Afreaka may be a young organization now but with time I believe it will become a leader in changing the way the world treats the conversation about sex and intimacy and it will put Africa at the head of forward and open thinking about one of the most personal topics people face.</em></p><p><em>Afreaka to me is the possibility of knowledge, full self-expression and communication world-wide.</em></p></p> Thu, 24 Apr 2014 08:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-long-grove-native-advocates-sex-education-africa-110256 Global Activism: "The Shoe Lady" returns from Uganda http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-shoe-lady-returns-uganda-110295 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ga-share your soles 2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Mona Purdy of <a href="http://shareyoursoles.org/">Share Your Soles</a> is just back from a few whirlwind weeks in Africa to expand her operation to Uganda. For Global Activism, &ldquo;The Shoe Lady&rdquo; joins us to talk about the pain and joy she saw and experienced. Share Your Soles has distributed more than two million shoes globally to people in desperate need of them. Mona says, &ldquo;When you choose to make a difference in an innocent child&rsquo;s life, you bring love, hope and a sense of belonging into their life &ndash; as well as your own.&rdquo;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/144076334&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/ShareYourSoles#">Mona&#39;s Facebook</a> posts from her recent trip to Uganda:</strong></p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-29e4bedf-6dac-3c45-8bab-13dfe555f97f">&quot;I&#39;m feeling like I&#39;m high on life this morning. Met with a woman&#39;s group here that have 400 HIV positive woman who they give work opportunities and education opportunities to as well. Hoping to partner missions with this group. The big meeting is this morning and if I can control the butterflies in my stomach I feel it will go super great. Hope you are all feeling the love !! Xxx&quot;</p><p><span class="userContent" data-ft="{&quot;tn&quot;:&quot;K&quot;}">&quot;I&#39;ve been humbled by the living conditions here. I find I am less wasteful of my shampoo, I trim my fruit and vegetables to the core without wasting. I smile when I see someone that makes me so sad I want to cry and I usually get a smile back. I will dance for children to get them to laugh. The family planning has begun in Sudan, Somoli, and Congo Zones as well as the &quot;<span class="text_exposed_show">will work for shoes&quot; program. the connections seem to empower the refugees and allows them to be a viable part of their communities. I am not a morning person but because I am so anxious to be here and learn, laugh and live I am up to wake the roosters.....love you all for the love and support of Share Your Soles xxxx</span></span>&quot;</p></p> Thu, 10 Apr 2014 09:09:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-shoe-lady-returns-uganda-110295 Global Activism: One-third of the World's produced food is wasted http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-one-third-worlds-produced-food-wasted-110294 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ga-Jeff Cabbages scaled.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-ebf7408a-6d4d-06f4-923b-c7fd66663e3a">More than 1.3 billion tons of food goes to waste every year. That&rsquo;s one third of the total amount of food produced worldwide. The <a href="http://www.foodbanking.org">Global Foodbanking Network</a> is working to turn that waste into opportunities to feed the hungry. Jeffrey D. Klein, president and CEO of the Global Foodbanking Network, and Bill Rudnick a board member and 25 year veteran of food banking ,will join us to talk about their work.<iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/142913118&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr">Jeffrey speaks on critical role of one FoodBanking Network partner:</p><p dir="ltr">&quot;I have said this on many occasions when asked about DLA Piper&rsquo;s pro bono work for The Global FoodBanking Network (GFN). It&rsquo;s a strong statement about our close relationship, DLA Piper&rsquo;s generous support on many, many levels. Beyond that, it&rsquo;s a statement about the depth of passion DLA Piper brings to our shared mission of fighting hunger around the world.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>A Humanitarian Solution to Two Critical Issues: Hunger and Food Waste</strong></p><p dir="ltr">GFN is an international non-profit organization dedicated to alleviating hunger and reducing food waste. We do that by creating, supplying and strengthening food banks and national food bank networks around the world, in countries outside the US. Currently, we support existing and developing food banks in more than 25 countries, home to more than one-third of the world&rsquo;s nearly one billion undernourished people.</p><p dir="ltr">Food banking is, in a sense, the business of logistics with a very important end result. We find and &ldquo;rescue&rdquo; perfectly nutritious, edible food that is non-saleable and get it to where it can be used to feed hungry people. It&rsquo;s a simplistic explanation, but it&rsquo;s really the core of what we do.</p><p dir="ltr">Many people are shocked when they learn that one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted so it never feeds a hungry person. We think this is a tragedy from a moral standpoint. It&rsquo;s also a huge issue for the environment because food in landfills breaks down very quickly and creates greenhouse gas in a ratio that&rsquo;s 20% greater than carbon dioxide. Food banking turns this problem into a solution to the problem of hunger.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>DLA Piper Helps Turn a US Idea into a Global Reality</strong></p><p dir="ltr">DLA Piper played a pivotal role in the creation of GFN and has remained an invaluable supporter of our mission and organization from the very beginning. In fact in the late 1990s, Bill Rudnick, a partner at DLA Piper, helped conceptualize the idea of global food banking with Bob Forney, who was the CEO of Feeding America at the time.</p><p dir="ltr">Bill had been actively involved with food banking in the US for a decade and realized the need for a global solution to problems of hunger and food waste. Bob, Bill, and a development team began working with food banking associations in Canada, Mexico, and Argentina to develop the global food banking model. In 2006, DLA Piper attorneys officially incorporated GFN and Bill became the founding Chairman of the Board.</p><p dir="ltr">Bill remains a member of the GFN board and stays involved from a professional and personal standpoint. Here is a story that shows how Bill and DLA Piper go the extra mile for GFN&hellip;</p><p dir="ltr">This year Bill joined a group of DLA Piper attorneys on a five-day, 364 mile bike ride through the Pyrenees before a global partners meeting. Always thinking of GFN, Bill turned this adventure into a fundraising opportunity for our organization. He completed the journey and exceeded his fundraising goal thanks to many DLA Piper staff and friends who contributed in support of Bill and his cause. Check out his fundraising page to learn more about Bill&rsquo;s<a href="http://www.razoo.com/story/My-Ridiculous-Ride-To-Fight-Hunger-Worldwide"> Ridiculous Ride to Fight Global Hunger</a>.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Insightful Legal Support around the World</strong></p><p dir="ltr">Since the very beginning, DLA Piper has worked tirelessly and enthusiastically with us helping us grow into a leading hunger fighting organization. They have supported our work and that of individual food banks in more than 20 countries and have helped us create food banks in places such as South Africa, India, Israel, and Hong Kong.</p><p dir="ltr">GFN projects are supported by New Perimeter, a subsidiary of DLA Piper that brings US Style pro bono work to international projects. What sets this legal team apart is that while they bring a depth and breadth of legal skills (in a variety of practice areas) they also bring sensitivity and deep knowledge of the issues surrounding the practice of food banking.</p><p dir="ltr">Food banking is different in every country based on the legal and political environments, the culture and the nature of the economy, and the food system. For example, the tax benefits for those who provide food or other donated items are different country to country. In some countries, businesses receive a charitable tax deduction for donations, in others there is no deduction, and in other countries businesses must actually pay a gift tax for the donation.</p><p dir="ltr">Along with their insightful international legal advice, DLA Piper donates office space in the Chicago office allowing us to do our work day in and day out. It&rsquo;s another show of generosity and a demonstration of our close relationship. We wouldn&rsquo;t exist without DLA Piper. We also wouldn&rsquo;t be able to continually grow and expand to bring more food to more people around the world.</p><p>Thanks DLA Piper for making it all possible.&quot;</p></p> Thu, 03 Apr 2014 09:31:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-one-third-worlds-produced-food-wasted-110294 Global Activism: Princess Kasune Zulu uses her HIV-positive status to save lives http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-princess-kasune-zulu-uses-her-hiv-positive-status-save-lives <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/GA-Princess.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr" id="docs-internal-guid-73944e5e-04bf-ed6e-fccf-5360018697f2">Princess Kasune Zulu was diagnosed with HIV over 17 years ago, at a time when that particular disease carried a heavy burden of stigma in her native Zambia. Since then, Princess Kasune has been advocating for education and healthcare for communities affected by HIV/AIDS. Her journey as the founder and spokesperson for her non-profit Fountain of Life has brought her from a one-room village school in Zambia all the way to the White House. For our <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a> series, she&rsquo;ll share her experiences as a leader in the fight against AIDS and discuss how the public conversation has changed about the disease since her diagnosis.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/141725390&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 27 Mar 2014 10:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-princess-kasune-zulu-uses-her-hiv-positive-status-save-lives Global Activism: Notre Dame Priest gives drinking wells and hope in Uganda http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-notre-dame-priest-gives-drinking-wells-and-hope-uganda-110289 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/ga-uganda.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Joliet has partnered to build drinking wells in Uganda with a Ugandan Priest, <a href="http://emmanuelkatongole.com/">Emmanuel Katongole</a>, who is also a theology professor at the <a href="http://kroc.nd.edu/facultystaff/faculty/emmanuel-katongole">University of Notre Dame</a>. When some church parishioners visited Uganda in 2010 to see the wells, they soon discovered that their gifts provided far more than just water for these communities. On this week&#39;s Global Activism, we&rsquo;ll talk with Father Emmanuel about his work, along with Deacon Ralph Bias of Sacred Heart Church.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="450" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/139423307&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Sacred Heart parishioner, Harry Wildfeuer, tells Fr. Katongole&#39;s story:</p><p>&quot;I&#39;m a member of a small Catholic Church in Joliet, IL that has built eight wells in Uganda in collaboration with a Catholic priest who is a currently a faculty member at the University of Notre Dame...Four years ago six church members went to Uganda and traveled with Father Emmanuel to determine if the six wells we had paid for at that time were, in fact, really providing water to the people they were meant to serve. Each well was successfully meeting small villages and two facilities needs. The two facilities we visited became a new interest and project for the six of us who made this journey. I would like to...communicate what the church has done regarding or is doing with these two facilities: a safe haven for girls fleeing the sex trade and an amazing orphanage.&quot;</p></p> Thu, 13 Mar 2014 09:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-notre-dame-priest-gives-drinking-wells-and-hope-uganda-110289