WBEZ | Hispanic http://www.wbez.org/tags/hispanic Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Why so few white kids land in CPS — and why it matters http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/why-so-few-white-kids-land-cps-%E2%80%94-and-why-it-matters-111094 <p><p>Legal segregation may be over in Chicago, but <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/race-out-loud/segregated-education-k-12-100456" target="_blank">racial isolation is well documented</a> in Chicago Public Schools.&nbsp;</p><p>CPS can <a href="http://www.cps.edu/Pages/MagnetSchoolsConsentDecree.aspx" target="_blank">no longer use race</a> as an admittance factor and more and more students are <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/education/more-chicago-kids-say-no-their-neighborhood-grammar-school-110604" target="_blank">eschewing their neighborhood schools</a> for other options. Education watchers argue there&rsquo;s a two-tier system in the district, and that <a href="http://www.wbez.org/eight-forty-eight/2012-04-25/chicagos-middle-class-not-interested-hidden-gem-high-schools-98519" target="_blank">attracting middle-class families</a> is a Sisyphean task.</p><p>Our segregated school system compelled the following Curious City question from a woman who wanted to remain anonymous:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>What percentage of white Chicago school age children attend public school?</em></p><p>Well, the short answer is 51 percent... according to the Census.</p><p>So roughly half of all white children who <em>could </em>go to CPS do, while the other half gets their education somewhere else. By comparison, the number of African-American school-age children who attend CPS is higher than 80 percent.&nbsp;</p><p>Part of this can be explained by a huge gap in the total number of eligible students based on race. More on that later, but first, let&rsquo;s take a closer look at how white parents decide where to send their kids to school.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Where should our kids go to school?</span></p><p>Of course, choosing where to enroll your child in school is an intense and private family decision. Some parents want their children to get a religious education, others want better resources, and sometimes where to go to school is simply a matter of logistics.</p><p>Alice DuBose lives in Andersonville and says she never had a problem with the neighborhood public school. But she did have a problem with its location relative to her job.</p><p>When her children were in elementary school, DuBose worked at the University of Chicago. She enrolled her three children in the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools on campus.</p><p>&ldquo;I could drop the kids off in the morning and go on to work and it was really great when I was working here because then I could just go over and see my daughters, participate in classroom activities to it was absolutely fantastic in that way,&quot; DuBose said.&nbsp;&quot;It was more convenient. If we had gone to a neighborhood school, I could&rsquo;ve never participated in classroom activities.&quot;</p><p>It also didn&rsquo;t hurt that Laboratory is a well-regarded private school with lots of resources. Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s children go there.</p><p>&ldquo;Lab&rsquo;s terrific,&rdquo; DuBose continued. &ldquo;Great teaching, smaller classrooms. All the things that we all want for our children.&rdquo;</p><p>DuBose&rsquo;s daughters attended there until 8th grade and then went on to attend Whitney Young &ndash; a CPS selective enrollment school. Now DuBose hopes her son follows in their footsteps.</p><p>The reality is many middle-class parents, including those not initially in CPS, jockey to get their children in selective public high schools like Whitney Young.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">&lsquo;Support Neighborhood Public Schools&rsquo;</span></p><p>Not far from Lab in Hyde Park, is a white family who was committed to CPS from the very beginning.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/joy%20clendenning%20michael%20scott%20hyde%20park.jpg" title="Joy Clendenning, left, and Michael Scott, right, live in Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood. All four of their children have enrolled or graduated from a Chicago public school. (WBEZ/Natalie Moore)" /></div><p>Joy Clendenning and Michael Scott live in Hyde Park. They didn&rsquo;t choose the neighborhood because of the schools. Scott grew up there and has strong family ties and Clendenning loves the quirky intellectualism of the area. The couple say they believe in public education and always knew their children would attend CPS. A sign in their window says &lsquo;Support Neighborhood Public Schools.&rsquo;</p><p>All four of their children attended Ray Elementary through sixth grade. The oldest went to Kenwood Academy&rsquo;s 7th and 8th grade academic center and stayed for high school. He&rsquo;s now a freshman at Occidental College. The second oldest is a sophomore at Whitney Young and started in its academic center. Their twins are currently in 8th grade at Kenwood. &nbsp;</p><p>Ray is a neighborhood school that also accepts students outside its attendance boundary through a lottery. 20 percent of its students are white and 55 percent black. Kenwood is the neighborhood high school and is 86 percent black. Their son was one of only a couple of white students in his graduating class.</p><p>&ldquo;Kenwood was a very good place for Sam and we never thought &#39;this was too black,&#39;&rdquo; Scott said.</p><p>Clendenning says they&#39;re concerned about how many schools and neighborhoods are segregated.</p><p>&quot;And we definitely think it&rsquo;s a problem that people in our neighborhood don&rsquo;t give the public schools a serious try,&quot; she added.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/yearbookphoto1.png" title="Sam Clendenning was one of only a handful of white students in his graduating class at Kenwood Academy. (Photo courtesy of Joy Clendenning) " /></div><p>Our Curious City question asker &ndash; who again wants to remain anonymous &ndash; raised a similar point in a follow-up email:</p><blockquote><p><em>I asked this question because I&#39;ve noticed in my small sampling of visiting public schools, other than a few of the magnet schools, it seems that we have a segregated school system along race lines.</em></p></blockquote><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Few school-age white children in the city</span></p><p>We know Chicago is almost equal parts black, Latino and white, but that&rsquo;s not the case when it comes to the city&rsquo;s youth. So while roughly a third of Chicago&rsquo;s total population is white, most of those numbers skew older. That means there aren&rsquo;t that many white school-age children to begin with.</p><p>Of the some 400,000 students enrolled in CPS K-12, 180,274 are Hispanic, 163,595 are black and just 33,659 are white. Even if all 65,259 eligible white students in the city went to CPS, they&rsquo;d still be far outnumbered by students who are black and brown.</p><div class="image-insert-image " style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/school%20age%20eligibility1.png" title="Data measures K-12 enrollment. Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Chicago Public Schools " /></div><p>Why does any of this matter?</p><p>&ldquo;Honestly, when you look at the data, it&rsquo;s very disturbing,&rdquo; Elaine Allensworth told WBEZ. Allensworth is the director of the Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago.</p><p>&ldquo;Because I do think we think of ourselves as a multi-ethnic city, a city of racial diversity. But then when you look at the numbers and you see how many schools are one-race schools and how segregated schools are based on race, I don&rsquo;t think that&rsquo;s where we want to be as a society,&quot; she said.</p><p>Segregation is made worse by the low number of white students overall.</p><p>&ldquo;We have a lot of neighborhoods in the city that are 90 percent or more African American or less than 10 percent African American. In fact, the vast majority of the city has that degree of racial segregation,&rdquo; Allensworth said.</p><p>In other words, if we don&rsquo;t live together, we don&rsquo;t tend to learn together.</p><p><a href="http://ec2-23-22-21-132.compute-1.amazonaws.com/chicagoschools" target="_blank"><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/SchoolsPromo1_0_0.jpg" style="float: left;" title="Click to launch 2010 map. " /></a><span style="font-size:22px;">Segregated neighborhoods, segregated schools</span></p><p>Take Mt. Greenwood, for example, on the Southwest Side. 82 percent of the student body is white &ndash;&nbsp;the highest percentage in all of CPS. And that makes sense. Mt. Greenwood, the neighborhood, is a majority white community.</p><p>The same holds true for many majority black communities.</p><p>As a result, the schools that serve the neighborhoods are also highly segregated based on race,&rdquo; Allensworth continued. &ldquo;So we have many many schools in the district that are close to 100 percent African American.&rdquo;</p><p><a href="http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Finteractive.wbez.org%2Fschools%2Fthe-big-sort.html&amp;sa=D&amp;sntz=1&amp;usg=AFQjCNEk2nK5oAwUsugvrZs7E0f7b8ZPzQ" target="_blank">Those poor-performing schools are typically in poor, black communities</a>&nbsp;that are suffering from substantial unemployment and lack of resources.</p><p>&ldquo;When we look at which schools are struggling the most, they are in the absolutely poorest neighborhoods in the city. &nbsp;We&rsquo;re talking about economic segregation,&rdquo; Allensworth said.&ldquo;There are other schools in affluent African-American communities that do not face the same kind of problems.&rdquo;</p><p>Segregated schools have always been an issue in Chicago, but it <em>looked </em>different back in the day.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/1964%20to%202013%20draft3.png" title="Sources: Chicago Public Schools Racial Ethnic Surveys and Stats and Facts" /></div></div><p>In the 1960s, CPS&rsquo;s student body was roughly 50 percent white and 50 percent black. Over time white students in the district steadily disappeared. Many neighborhoods transitioned from white to black. Depopulation also played a role.</p><p><span style="text-align: center;">In 1975, whites made up about 25 percent of the student body. By 2013 only 9 percent of CPS students were white.</span></p><p>WBEZ asked CPS officials to weigh in on these numbers. They failed to address the segregation issue and emailed some boilerplate language about &ldquo;serving a diverse population.&rdquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CPS 2013 pie chart3.png" style="height: 361px; width: 300px; float: right;" title="Source: Chicago Public Schools Race/Ethnic Report School Year 2013-2014" /><span style="font-size:22px;">Where are the white students in CPS?</span></p><p>Again, we know half of white school-age children in Chicago attend CPS. But the question of where they go in CPS is also something that piqued the curiosity of our question asker.</p><p>She wondered if they are disproportionately attending magnet and other selective enrollment schools.</p><p>The answer appears to be, yes.</p><p>Overall, 9 percent of the CPS student population is white. But it&rsquo;s more than double that at magnet, gifted and classical elementary schools. And in the eight selective enrollment high schools &ndash; like Whitney Young &ndash; nearly a quarter of students are white.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a very small number of students though because those schools don&rsquo;t serve a large number of students,&rdquo; according to Elaine Allensworth. &ldquo;We really haven&rsquo;t seen that much of a shift in terms of attracting more white students [overall].&rdquo;</p><p>Although our question asker focused on white students, there&rsquo;s another racial shift worth mentioning.</p><p>Beyond black and white, the real story of CPS today may be that it&rsquo;s becoming more Latino.&nbsp;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author" target="_blank">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me" target="_blank">Google+</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore" target="_blank">Twitter</a>.</em></p><p><em style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the requirements for attending Ray Elementary. It is a neighborhood school that accepts students outside its attendance boundaries through a lottery, not testing.</em></p></p> Wed, 12 Nov 2014 15:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/why-so-few-white-kids-land-cps-%E2%80%94-and-why-it-matters-111094 Protesters want Obama to end mass deportations http://www.wbez.org/news/protesters-want-obama-end-mass-deportations-109982 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/protest1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>More than 200 people, including groups of children, are staging a two-day march drawing attention to mass deportations of undocumented immigrants. The protesters want the Obama administration to end the practice by executive order.</p><p>The march, which began this morning at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in downtown Chicago before heading west. It is an extension of this past weekend&rsquo;s National Day of Action against deportations.</p><p>As of this month, around 2 million undocumented people have been deported since Barack Obama took office, which is approaching the record set by his predecessor, George W. Bush.</p><p>Immigration reform advocates have shifted their focus recently&nbsp; to putting an emphasis on the number of mass deportations. Previously their priority was pushing for immigration reform legislation. An immigration bill passed the U.S. Senate early last year but has stalled in the House since June).</p><p>&ldquo;Two million (is) too many,&rdquo; says Rosi Carrasco, with Organized Communities Against Deportations. &ldquo;It is possible to stop deportations with the organization, determination, and strength of our community. President Obama can use his executive authority to avoid that detention centers continue to profit from human suffering.&rdquo;</p><p>The Chicago-area protests will continue into tomorrow. Lawrence Benito is executive director of the Illinois Commission for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, and he says the focus on mass deportations highlights the continued frustration he has with Obama -- who he said pledged to pursue immigration reform as an agenda item he would tackle during his second term.</p><p>&ldquo;He promised our communities that passing immigration reform would be a priority,&rdquo; says Benito. &ldquo;Instead he has prioritized enforcement. He can remedy the situation while Congress debates immigration reform, through administrative relief.&rdquo;</p><p>Advocates want the president to take the same approach he did in 2012 when he ended the deportation for so-called &ldquo;Dreamers,&rdquo; young people who were brought into the country with undocumented relatives.&nbsp;</p><p>Marchers began their demonstration at ICE shortly after 10 a.m today. Their route wends through the city, including a stop in the heavily Latino South Side community of Pilsen, before decamping tonight in the western suburbs.</p><p>Tuesday&rsquo;s events are scheduled to start at the Broadview Detention Center. That is where more people are scheduled to take part in civil disobedience protests.</p><p><em>Follow WBEZ Host/Producer Yolanda Perdomo on <a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/106564114685277342468/posts/p/pub">Google+</a></em></p></p> Mon, 07 Apr 2014 12:55:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/protesters-want-obama-end-mass-deportations-109982 Fit for a princess http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/fit-princess-109750 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/140221_Quinces1.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Much like a wedding, it begins with a beautiful dress. At Andrea&rsquo;s Bridal in Little Village, only three bridal gowns are on display. But there are dozens of dresses, in every color and color combination imaginable, for girls awaiting quinceañera parties&mdash;a &ldquo;sweet fifteen&rdquo; celebrated in many Latino cultures.</p><p>The dresses all have the same silhouette: a small bodice on top that sits on a huge, ruffled, layered bottom, supported by a large hoop skirt. Like something you&rsquo;d see in &ldquo;Gone with the Wind.&rdquo;</p><p>Rocio Aguayo is the director of <em>Quinceanera </em>magazine. She&rsquo;s also staging one of two quinceañera expos taking place this weekend in the Chicago suburbs. Her event is in Hickory Hills, expected to draw around 2,500.</p><p>&ldquo;The quinceañera is basically the coming out, presenting of a young girl to society,&rdquo; Aguayo said. &ldquo;The main idea is she&rsquo;s leaving her childhood and she&rsquo;s entering into womanhood.&rdquo;</p><p>Years ago, a ceremony would have included a dress, professional photography and a blessing at a mass. Maybe a small party.</p><p>Today what is spent on a quinces could easily rival a wedding. Aguayo says the average cost of a quinceañera is between $15,000 and $18,000.</p><p>Families will pay for a banquet hall, dinner, a multi-tiered cake, a big dress, photography. And now choreography. Girls have courts, much like bridesmaids and groomsmen. The girls are damas. The guys chambelanes. And they all have to know how to waltz.</p><p>Lily Garcia runs Magic Movements dance company. She provides choreography lessons for a basic waltz. Lily also has backup male dancers, for girls who do not have chambelanes. A basic waltz package starts at $800. The deluxe package featuring dancers is $2,200.</p><p>&ldquo;Sometimes I cry because it&rsquo;s so pretty,&rdquo; Garcia said. &ldquo;I would not like to take that away because they financially can&rsquo;t afford it. So we do our best to accommodate them.&rdquo;</p><p>She may have to accommodate Laura Delgado, who is on a tight budget. Her daughter Joselyn celebrates her quinces in July. Their limit is $5,000, for the whole event.</p><p>&ldquo;You try to tell your children it might be better to open a bank account with that money,&rdquo; Laura said.</p><p>Joselyn disagrees.</p><p>&ldquo;I want the party,&rdquo; she said with a smile.</p><p>But some believe the giant events overshadow the basics of the tradition, which include a teen receiving a special blessing at a mass. Father Patrick Casey is one of those people. He performs quinceañera masses, but wonders why he bothers.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve had masses where the kids have been very very intense and participating.&nbsp; And then other kids that are absolutely bored,&rdquo; Casey said. &ldquo;Frankly, I would get rid of the quinceañera. But I don&rsquo;t think we can do that because the cultural element of the people.&rdquo;</p><p>While a party may exclude religious components, for Latino families a quinceañera is about passing on a festive tradition. They share the cost with so-called &ldquo;sponsors,&rdquo; a grandmother or an aunt who will pay for a dress, invitations, a cake or other items.</p><p>The night before Kassandra Santamaria&rsquo;s quinces, she and her mother Ingrid thumbed through a photo album of Ingrid&rsquo;s quinceañera. In the kitchen area of their spacious Bolingbrook home, they tear up anticipating the next day&rsquo;s event. It is a party will cost them at least $16,000.</p><p>&ldquo;I just feel so happy. I just thank my mom. I can be so mean sometimes. And I regret it. But I tell her everyday I love her,&rdquo; Kassandra said while crying. Ingrid put her arm around her daughter and assured her.</p><p>&ldquo;This day is going to be really, really special,&quot; Ingrid said. &quot;And I&rsquo;m pretty sure we&rsquo;re all going to have fun.&rdquo;</p><p>The night of the quinceañera was, in a word, peachy. At a Chicago banquet hall, peach-colored ribbons are tied around chairs. Peach napkins are on tables, peach roses sit on a seven-tiered cake. The damas have peach dresses, all to match Kassandra&rsquo;s fluffy peach gown. While waiting for the party to start, guests get their pictures taken on a red carpet.</p><p>Arnold Correa is the night&rsquo;s DJ. He says at least 50 percent of his quinceañera customers pay an extra $375 for the red carpet experience. For the works -- music, lighting, red carpet photography, and emcee services -- Kassandra&rsquo;s parents will pay a little more than $1,300, the wintertime discount.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;Everyone wants to make their quinceañera more extravagant. Which is a good thing. For me and the other vendors,&rdquo; Correa said. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s so much revenue coming out of this: boutique shops, cakes, choreographers, DJs.&rdquo;</p><p>That is money, millions of dollars, recirculated within Latino communities throughout the United States. Because most quinces vendors are fellow Latinos.</p><p>But none of that matters to 15-year-old Kassanda. For her, the evening is nothing less than priceless.</p><p><em>Follow WBEZ Host/Producer Yolanda Perdomo on Twitter&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/MikePuenteNews">@yolandanews</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/106564114685277342468/posts/p/pub" target="_blank">Google+</a></em></p></p> Fri, 21 Feb 2014 11:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/fit-princess-109750 Chicago's Hispanic neighborhoods farther from nature, study shows http://www.wbez.org/blogs/chris-bentley/2013-01/chicagos-hispanic-neighborhoods-farther-nature-study-shows-104838 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS4344_P1030210-scr.JPG" style="height: 349px; width: 620px;" title="A man fishes in Humboldt Park lagoon in early fall. (WBEZ/Robin Amer)" /></p><p>Moving to the city shouldn&rsquo;t mean giving up nature. <a href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100723161221.htm">Studies have shown</a> that people who spend more time in natural settings bounce back from stress faster and <a href="http://articles.cnn.com/2001-03-23/health/nature.health_1_nature-howard-frumkin-view?_s=PM:HEALTH">might even be healthier</a> than those without access to parks and open spaces. In Chicago, however, some communities are closer to nature than others.</p><p>According to recent research out of the University of Illinois at Chicago, residents of Chicago&rsquo;s Hispanic neighborhoods live farther from nature than residents of other neighborhoods.</p><p>What is unique about the study, titled &ldquo;<a href="http://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/ES12-00126.1">Green infrastructure and bird diversity across an urban socioeconomic gradient</a>,&rdquo; is that it looked at multiple variables instead of just, say, average distance to greenspace. They measured proximity to open space and Lake Michigan, but also the presence of trees (canopy cover), and bird biodiversity in census tracts across the city.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Tree-canopy-cover,-bird-biodiversity-and-distance-to-the-lake.jpg" title="Left to right: tree canopy cover, distance to open space, and bird biodiversity. (Amélie Davis)" /></div></div><p>&ldquo;When you look at the patterns across all four variables,&rdquo; said <a href="https://sites.google.com/site/davisamelie/">Amélie Davis</a>, a postdoctoral research associate at UIC and lead author of the study, &ldquo;you can see the low- to mid-income Hispanic tracts are further from Lake Michigan, further from open space, they have lower bird biodiversity, and they have the lowest percent canopy cover.&rdquo;</p><p>That means they are also farther from the benefits those natural elements either indicate or provide directly &mdash; ecosystem services, to use the jargon. Canopy cover, for example, is more than aesthetic. Trees help regulate the local air quality, stormwater runoff and even noise pollution.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/streetview%20comparison.png" style="height: 266px; width: 620px;" title="A Google Streetview comparison of two neighborhoods with different amounts of canopy cover. (Google)" /></div><p>That socioeconomic disparities influence Chicagoans&rsquo; access to nature is not entirely surprising, given the city&rsquo;s legacy of <a href="http://www.suntimes.com/10333485-417/segregation-drops-sharply-in-chicago.html">segregation</a>. What was unexpected, Davis said, was that the statistical analysis found low-income, Hispanic neighborhoods fared significantly worse than low-income, African-American areas.</p><p>&ldquo;We thought if there was an environmental injustice,&rdquo; she said, &ldquo;it would be for all of the groups or none. Not the same group consistently underserved.&rdquo;</p><p>As <a href="http://featuresblogs.chicagotribune.com/theskyline/2011/10/cramped-chicago-half-of-the-citys-27-million-people-live-in-park-poor-areas-lakefronts-parkland-disg.html">the <em>Tribune</em>&rsquo;s Blair Kamin pointed out</a>, Chicago&rsquo;s massive lakeside parks give the impression that the whole city enjoys easy access to open space along the shoreline <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/question-answered-how-has-chicago%E2%80%99s-coastline-changed-over-decades-104328">(which is, after all, &ldquo;forever open, clear and free&rdquo;</a>). Inland it is a different story. Little Village, for example, has <a href="http://www.metroplanning.org/news-events/blog-post/6262">the least green space per capita</a> of any neighborhood in the city.</p><p>But Davis cautioned against assuming any ill-intent on the part of City Hall.</p><p><em>&ldquo;</em>It might be a concurrence of circumstance, and not pernicious,&rdquo; she said. Industry squeezed out most of the natural spaces in Pilsen and Little Village before those neighborhoods became an important Hispanic enclave. When their notorious coal-fired power plants shut down last year, however, <a href="http://www.archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=6258">residents of the southwest side left no doubt</a> about their aspirations for more green space.</p><p>And the study does not tell the whole story. Proximity to open space is not a perfect stand-in for access, to say nothing of the quality of that open space.</p><p>Davis&rsquo; research is funded by an Urban Long Term Research Area Exploratory grant from the National Science Foundation. &nbsp;The study was published in Ecosphere, a journal of the Ecological Society of America.</p><p><em>Follow Chris on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/Cementley">@cementley</a>.&nbsp;</em></p></p> Fri, 11 Jan 2013 07:30:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/chris-bentley/2013-01/chicagos-hispanic-neighborhoods-farther-nature-study-shows-104838 Minority youths consume more media than their counterparts http://www.wbez.org/story/minority-youths-consume-more-media-their-counterparts-87579 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-June/2011-06-08/Untitled.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>A <a href="http://web5.soc.northwestern.edu/cmhd/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/SOCconfReportSingleFinal-1.pdf">new Northwestern University study</a> says minority youth ages eight to 18 spend more than half their day consuming media content – a rate that's 4.5 hours greater than their white counterparts.</p><p>The <em>Children, Media and Race: Media Use Among White, Black, Hispanic and Asian American Children</em> report released Wednesday says that minority youths are more likely to spend up to 2 hours more per day watching TV, one hour more per day listening to music, 90 minutes more per day using a computer, and up to 40 minutes more per day playing video games than do their white counterparts.</p><p>Reading for pleasure in pre-teens and teens was equal across races, averaging at 30 to 40 minutes a day. But for children six and under, it was more likely that children of white parents were reading or read to every day.</p><p>Multitasking among youth has been adopted as equal rates; around four in ten white, black and Hispanic 7th to 12th graders said that they use another medium “most of the time” they’re watching television.&nbsp;</p><p>Surprisingly, parental structures did not predict total media exposure. The study found that most parents do not set limits on the amount of time children can spend interacting with media for pleasure.</p><p>Within the use of these media, however, white parents were more likely to set rules for what their children could consume, including television programs watched, internet sites used, and their visibility on social networking sites like Facebook.</p><p>Co-author <a href="http://www.communication.northwestern.edu/faculty/?PID=EllenWartella&amp;type=alpha">Ellen Wartella</a>, head of Northwestern University’s Center on Media and Human Development, says the study is not meant to blame parents but should serve as a wake-up call. She says increased parental involvement could mitigate potential problems, including child obesity.</p><p>The study authors argued that considering the role of media in the lives of children is incredibly important, noting that “the purpose of this report is to briefly hit a national ‘pause’ button: to stop and take note of these differences, to consider the possible positive and negative implications for young people’s health and well-being, and to reflect on how each of us can respond in our own realm.”</p></p> Wed, 08 Jun 2011 15:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/minority-youths-consume-more-media-their-counterparts-87579 Pope, Martinez battle for 10th Ward http://www.wbez.org/story/10th-ward/pope-martinez-battle-10th-ward <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/pope.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:PunctuationKerning /> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas /> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables /> <w:SnapToGridInCell /> <w:WrapTextWithPunct /> <w:UseAsianBreakRules /> <w:DontGrowAutofit /> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]><object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui></object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]--></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">On Chicago's southeast side, you'll find the 10th ward - a gritty neighborhood with working class homes and tracts of empty industrial space. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">It hasn't made big political news for a while, but there's an interesting development this election season.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">The ward's aldermen have always been Caucasian, despite the fact that the diverse neighborhood was home to Chicago's first Mexican immigrants.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">For a long time, if you saw the face of an alderman from the 10th ward, you'd see the face of a white man. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">One of the highest profile was Eddie Vrdolyak. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">In the eighties, he had public spats with alderman from minority neighborhoods &hellip; and he sparred with the city's first black mayor, Harold Washington. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">WASHINGTON</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">: Anyone who has a grain of sense in his head would say there is something amiss here. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">VRDOLYAK:: Well, the mayor says a lot of things and unfortunately right now what he sounds like right now is a loser. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">WASHINGTON</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">: Ed Vrdolyak systematically has discriminated against Hispanics in this city. He is responsible for Hispanics being denied the opportunity to vote for people of their own choice over the past three years.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">The city, and the 10th ward, have changed a lot since the eighties, but there's a sense that ethnicity is still on the radar. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">At least it is at Richard Martinez Jr's campaign.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Martinez</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;"> has numbers pinned on his wall. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">They read:</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">120.</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">170.</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">55. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">And so on. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">These are the number of Hispanic voters he's counted in each 10th ward precinct. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Martinez</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;"> sees each one as a potential asset for his attempt to become the ward's first Latino alderman.</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">MARTINEZ</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">: We've been a part of the culture. We've been a part of this community. The one part that we have been a part but we haven't really had any leadership in is in the political side. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">The racial mix in the 10th ward is complex. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">African Americans and Hispanics make up the majority but there's still a sizeable Anglo population. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Martinez</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;"> happens to be half Polish, but he feels his Latino heritage will resonate.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">MARTINEZ</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">: There is a historical component to this race. I think there are a lot of people that have a lot of pride in that and obviously I think that creates a lot of excitement.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">POPE: This is the year 2011. I think people generally are smarter than that. They want someone who is going to lead them, someone who is going to work closely with them.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">That's John Pope, the incumbent in this aldermanic race. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">He doesn't think ethnicity will be much of a factor. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">POPE: I'm not female but hopefully I represent females just as well as I represent males. I've been around a long time. I've been working closely with people. I reach out to every end of the community. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Pope's represented the ward since 1999, and he's usually hit economic issues pretty hard: things like jobs, new housing and, just spiffing up acres of old industrial sites. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">He thinks ethnicity should be a sideshow; the economy will take center stage.&nbsp; </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">POPE: We've had new success with everything from a new Aldi's, to Walgreens to Bubbleland. Green buildings in terms of retail shopping stores. And I guess we're really focusing on the industrial jobs because that's what this area is really known for.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">On the other side, Martinez's campaign is not solely based on race. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">He talks about the economy, too, but he has a different vision. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Pope hopes to lure heavy industrial factories back. Martinez isn't so sure that will work. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">MARTINEZ</span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">: If you take a ride through the ward you'll see coal piles and smoke stacks. All kinds of dirty industry that's still very prominent in this community. It's my job to bring in investment that will contribute to the health, the welfare, the safety and the environment of our ward.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">I catch up with potential voters at C&amp;G restaurant on Torrance Avenue during the breakfast rush. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">I'm there for breakfast &hellip; and to ask some open questions about the aldermanic race. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">A lot of people were like Lucy Alvarez. </span><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">They just didn't bring up ethnicity. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">ALVAREZ: The neighborhood has come down ever since the mills have left. We need to sort of pick this up in order for anything more to happen to the people on this side of town. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Of course, no one can really say how much ethnicity will count in the 10th Ward's aldermanic contest, at least not until the returns come in Tuesday.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Two other candidates are also on the ballot: Jose Leon and Joseph Nasella.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">However, neither of those men could be reached for comment. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">(Audio clip of Washington-</span><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:PunctuationKerning /> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas /> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables /> <w:SnapToGridInCell /> <w:WrapTextWithPunct /> <w:UseAsianBreakRules /> <w:DontGrowAutofit /> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]--><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial;">Vrdolyak from WBBM Channel 2 Chicago.)<br /></span></p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal"><span player="null" class="filefield_audio_insert_player" id="filefield_audio_insert_player-88610" href="/sites/default/files/John Pope (extended interview).mp3">John Pope (extended interview).mp3</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal">Extended interview with 10th Ward Alderman John Pope. Our conversation includes talk about economic development, improving schools and working with Chicago's new mayor.</p><p class="MsoNormal"><span player="null" class="filefield_audio_insert_player" id="filefield_audio_insert_player-88611" href="/sites/default/files/Richard Martinez (extended interview).mp3">Richard Martinez (extended interview).mp3</span></p><p class="MsoNormal">Extended interview with Richard Martinez Jr., who is running for alderman of the 10th Ward. Our conversation includes talk about improving schools, economic development and fighting crime.</p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p><p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 18 Feb 2011 22:10:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/10th-ward/pope-martinez-battle-10th-ward