WBEZ | Roberto Maldonado http://www.wbez.org/tags/roberto-maldonado Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Bakery owner apologizes for ‘Humboldt Crack’ http://www.wbez.org/story/bakery-owner-apologizes-%E2%80%98humboldt-crack%E2%80%99-96679 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2012-February/2012-02-23/Tipsycake.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><img alt="Protest" class="caption" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2012-February/2012-02-23/Tipsycake.JPG" style="margin: 9px 18px 6px 1px; float: left; width: 346px; height: 306px;" title="A protest hits the bakery’s Humboldt Park facility Thursday afternoon. (WBEZ/Chip Mitchell)">Facing a boycott backed by two Chicago aldermen, a Northwest Side bakery owner on Thursday afternoon apologized for comments some Puerto Ricans had called racist.</p><p>TipsyCake proprietor Naomi Levine posted the <a href="http://www.facebook.com/TipsyCakeChicago/posts/10150671283345845">apology on Facebook</a>, calling the comments “insensitive” and acknowledging she “never took any time to develop a real understanding of the very community and the history of the people that I have had the fortune of living among for the past six years.”</p><p>Levine moved her business into a Humboldt Park storefront, 1043 N. California Ave., in 2006. Her baking facilities remain there but last year she moved the retail shop to 1944 N. Damen Ave. The shop stands in the middle of Bucktown, a higher-rent neighborhood.</p><p>Explaining the move <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbPbeCcHs2c&amp;feature=youtu.be">on a local Internet show</a> this month, Levine laughed about Humboldt Park gunshots. “We really wanted Bucktown for a location as opposed to the Humboldt Park [shop],” she said on the show, “so that [we could have] any type of client, not feeling nervous.”</p><p>Levine also told the host about a pastry she had nicknamed “Humboldt Crack” because “the cops would knock on the door and ask to taste the crack.”</p><p>The interview went viral and sparked outrage.</p><p>“You’re making an attack on a community that I personally have worked so hard to sustain,” said Juanita García, who helps run an alternative high school in the neighborhood. “I’m choosing to raise my child in this community.”</p><p>On Thursday afternoon, Alds. Roberto Maldonado (26th Ward) and Proco Joe Moreno (1st) blasted Levine and called on community members to make their bakery purchases elsewhere.</p><p>García praised Levine for apologizing but said she couldn’t call off the boycott on her own. She said she would speak with other neighborhood activists about it.</p><p>Levine did not return calls from WBEZ.</p></p> Fri, 24 Feb 2012 00:08:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/bakery-owner-apologizes-%E2%80%98humboldt-crack%E2%80%99-96679 Trash problems in Chicago: Who you gonna call? http://www.wbez.org/story/trash-problems-chicago-who-you-gonna-call-93870 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-November/2011-11-08/RS4094_Dear Chicago Green the fleet3.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago aldermen have long controlled a key city service: garbage pick-up. But not for long, says Mayor Rahm Emanuel. As part of our coverage this week of Emanuel's budget, we look at the politics of trash.</p><p>Right now, Chicago's garbage trucks are assigned to one of its 50 wards.</p><p>"No person designing a garbage collection system from scratch would base it on a political map," Emanuel told aldermen during his budget address in mid-October.</p><p>Emanuel wants to move to a grid system. Trucks would have straightforward routes instead of zig-zagging within squiggly ward boundaries. The administration said that'd save $20 million in the first year. Some aldermen have embraced the change, but not all.</p><p>"It's not about politics," said Ald. Roberto Maldonado of the West Side's 26th Ward, during an interview at his Humboldt Park office. "It is about efficiency, and making sure that my constituents will be reassured that they won't have any problems."</p><p>Maldonado said that, historically, "constituents hold accountable the alderman for the garbage collection."</p><p>So if he no longer controls trash pick-up, Maldonado wants residents to call "the mayor's office number" with trash complaints. But that already kind-of happens. It's 311, Chicago's non-emergency hotline. And from a quick survey in Maldonado's ward, people already do that.</p><p>"For things like that, you don't really need to call the aldermen," Robert Williams said. "You call 311."</p><p>"I just dial 311 since it's non-emergency and ask them to come pick up the garbage," said Ivan Rivera.</p><p>Shikita Carr said she calls the police to report garbage problems, and she claimed they respond. (Though maybe that's not the best advice.)</p><p>Still, those responses indicate residents already expect centralized services. Recycling - in areas where there is recycling - is picked up on a grid. And last year the city started "field testing" grid garbage pickup, though a Streets and Sanitation Department spokesman says there's no "hard data available" from the tests.</p><p>At a recent hearing, a handful of aldermen grumbled about Emanuel's plan and how few details have been released. The city is paying a consultant to chart out the grids using GIS mapping software. But those results aren't expected to be ready until after aldermen vote on the budget.</p></p> Wed, 09 Nov 2011 06:00:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/trash-problems-chicago-who-you-gonna-call-93870 Prosecutors to look at officers shown on video http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/prosecutors-look-officers-shown-video-84899 <p><p>The Chicago Police Department is asking prosecutors to see if two officers <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">shown in a video</a> on the city’s Northwest Side ought to face criminal charges.<br> <br> The video, shot March 19 in the Humboldt Park neighborhood, shows the officers outside a marked police SUV with a backdoor open as onlookers flash gang signs and taunt a young man inside. After WBEZ spotted the recording, the police department stripped the officers of their police powers and put them on desk duty. The department’s Internal Affairs Division began an investigation.<br> <br> Now the department has referred the case to the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, according to office spokeswoman Sally Daly, who declined to comment further.<br> <br> “It’s a rare occurrence when Internal Affairs actually refers a case for potential criminal prosecution,” says Craig Futterman, a clinical law professor at the University of Chicago.<br> <br> Chicago attorney Arthur Loevy this week <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/youth%E2%80%99s-family-hires-lawyer-after-video-cops-surfaces-84740">said he represents</a> the young man shown in the video. Loevy said the youth is a minor and that the two officers put him into the SUV against his will.<br> <br> WBEZ is not naming the officers at this time.<br> <br> <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627">Some neighborhood residents</a>, meanwhile, are circulating a petition that asks the police department to return the officers to beat duty.</p></p> Fri, 08 Apr 2011 10:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/prosecutors-look-officers-shown-video-84899 Youth’s family hires lawyer after video with cops surfaces http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/youth%E2%80%99s-family-hires-lawyer-after-video-cops-surfaces-84740 <p><p>A veteran Chicago attorney says he is representing a young man <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">shown on video</a> in the backseat of a Chicago police SUV.<br> <br> The video, shot March 19, shows a backdoor of the SUV open as onlookers flash gang signs and taunt the young man. The officers are outside the vehicle, a Chevrolet Tahoe with police markings, and appear to be standing by.<br> <br> <a href="http://www.loevy.com/Attorneys/Arthur-Loevy.shtml">Attorney Arthur Loevy</a> says the young man is a minor whom the officers loaded into the SUV against his will before driving him to the Humboldt Park block where a bystander shot the 90-second video.<br> <br> Residents of that block say the house closest to the SUV is a base of a street gang that operates in the neighborhood. They say the officers drove away with the young man after about five minutes.<br> <br> Loevy says the officers then dropped the youth off nearby and did not charge him. The attorney says the young man made it home OK but is moving out of Chicago for his own safety.<br> <br> After WBEZ spotted the video, the police department said it put the officers on desk duty and began an internal investigation. Interim police Supt. Terry Hillard said tactics to scare kids straight are <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/chicago-police/chicago-police-superintendent-conduct-video-not-professional-84290">always inappropriate</a>.<br> <br> WBEZ is not naming the officers at this time.<br> <br> Meanwhile, <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627">neighbors involved with CAPS</a>, the city’s community-policing program, want the department to return the officers to beat duty.</p></p> Tue, 05 Apr 2011 09:32:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/arthur-loevy/youth%E2%80%99s-family-hires-lawyer-after-video-cops-surfaces-84740 Police video: Cops’ supporter speaks out http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-April/2011-04-01/Eric_Hudson.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Here’s a follow-up on a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">video</a> WBEZ has been reporting about. That video, shot March 19, shows a young man in the backseat of a Chicago police SUV. A back door is open and he’s getting taunted by onlookers who flash gang signs — while two officers seem to stand by. The police department has assigned those officers to desk duty and started an internal investigation. WBEZ is not naming them at this time. Some Northwest Side residents, meanwhile, are petitioning the department to put those two cops back on their beat. WBEZ’s Chip Mitchell connected with Eric Hudson, a resident behind that effort. They spoke near Hudson’s home, just blocks from where the video was shot. Hudson has worked with the two officers to root out gangs from his own corner. As he explains in this six-minute interview (below), he has also worked to hold police accountable for abuses.</p><p><audio class="mejs mediaelement-formatter-identified-1332483429-1" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/insert-image/2011-april/2011-04-01/video2110401cm.mp3">&nbsp;</audio></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 01 Apr 2011 20:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627 Neighborhood residents defend Chicago cops shown on video http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/neighborhood-residents-defend-chicago-cops-shown-video-84518 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-31/ChiPolice-AP.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Two Chicago cops <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blog/city-room-blog/2011-03-22/video-questionable-police-tactics-caught-tape-84086">shown on video</a> with a young man in the backseat of their SUV are getting support from some Northwest Side residents.<br> <br> In the video, recorded March 19 in Humboldt Park, the officers appear to be standing by as onlookers flash gang symbols and taunt the young man. After WBEZ spotted the video, the police department put the officers on desk duty and began an internal investigation. On Friday, interim police Supt. Terry Hillard called the incident “not professional.”<br> <br> The neighborhood residents say they’re drafting a petition to Hillard that praises the officers. They’re also organizing calls and messages to Ald. Roberto Maldonado (26th Ward) and Linda Flores, commander of the police department’s Shakespeare District.<br> <br> “I would never do this for any cops but these two,” said Eric Hudson, who knows the officers through CAPS, the city’s community-policing program. “These aren’t John Wayne Robocops out here. Their actions empower us to become more vocal and take back our corners.”<br> <br> Witnesses say the incident lasted about five minutes before the officers drove the young man away.</p><p><strong>Hear our interview with Eric Hudson at <a href="http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/police-video-cops%E2%80%99-supporter-speaks-out-84627">Police video: Cops’ supporter speaks out</a>.</strong></p></p> Thu, 31 Mar 2011 09:01:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/caps/neighborhood-residents-defend-chicago-cops-shown-video-84518 Winning a referendum is no silver bullet http://www.wbez.org/story/200-cut-rate-liquors/winning-referendum-no-silver-bullet <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/story/photo/2011-March/2011-03-13/REFERENDUM_Rea_Woods.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>The idea behind a referendum is to give voters a direct voice in making their community better. These ballot questions can cover anything from stem-cell research to the fate of an empty lot. They may be binding or just advisory. Last month, referenda were on ballots in nine Chicago precincts. But it&rsquo;s not clear the voters will get what they had in mind &mdash; even if they were on the winning side. We&rsquo;ll hear now from WBEZ reporters in three parts of the city. We start with Chip Mitchell at our West Side bureau.<br /><br />MITCHELL: Kurt Gippert lives near a building here in Humboldt Park that seemed like a magnet.<br /><br />GIPPERT: Gang banging, loitering, drug sales, some prostitution, tons of urinating.<br /><br />MITCHELL: It was a liquor store.<br /><br />GIPPERT: In 2010, we had at least nine people shot in front of that store.<br /><br />MITCHELL: Under city pressure, the store closed last fall. Gippert and his neighbors wanted it gone for good, so they turned to a 77-year-old Illinois law that lets voters ban selling alcohol in their precinct.<br /><br />GIPPERT: It&rsquo;s the only power we had &mdash; the only surefire, effective thing that was going to last longer than six months or a year.<br /><br />MITCHELL: They petitioned to put the referendum on last month&rsquo;s ballot. And voters passed it about 4-to-1. Starting next week, the precinct will be dry. There&rsquo;s just one problem.<br /><br />SOUND: Car alarm.<br /><br />MITCHELL (on the scene): The place with the gang bangers in front wasn&rsquo;t the precinct&rsquo;s only store selling alcohol. I&rsquo;m outside a CVS a few blocks west. The clerks inside tell me booze accounts for about half their sales. But there&rsquo;s also a stream of customers who rely on this CVS for everything from prescription drugs to shampoo and milk. Without its liquor sales here, some of these folks worry CVS might close this store.<br /><br />CUSTOMER 1: Some of my family members get their prescriptions filled here. And it&rsquo;s really convenient that they can walk here instead of worrying about getting a ride or catching the bus.<br /><br />MITCHELL (on the scene): Do they have cars?<br /><br />CUSTOMER 1: No.<br /><br />CUSTOMER 2: I got three kids, so we need milk. If you get something for them from the corner store, it&rsquo;ll probably be old.<br /><br />CUSTOMER 3: Everybody around here, I guess, is poor. So they need to get to a place that most of them can walk to. Bus fare is high. Cab fare is high. So, yeah, it would hurt them.<br /><br />MITCHELL: CVS isn&rsquo;t answering whether it&rsquo;ll keep the store open once it quits selling alcohol. Ald. Roberto Maldonado (26th) supported the referendum. But he admits there&rsquo;s collateral damage.<br /><br />MALDONADO: We don&rsquo;t have a lot of retail in the area. And we have never heard complaints about CVS. However, if they depend on liquor to remain viable, then they should not be open.<br /><br />MITCHELL: I ask Maldonado about other precincts in his ward.<br /><br />MITCHELL (on the scene): Businesses that are selling alcohol and doing so responsibly, without a lot of problems out in front, do they have anything to worry about?<br /><br />MALDONADO: No, they don&rsquo;t have to worry as long as they are conscious about their own responsibility [to be] a good business neighbor.<br /><br />MITCHELL: And as long as residents don&rsquo;t vote the precinct dry. Reporting from Chicago&rsquo;s West Side, I&rsquo;m Chip Mitchell.<br /><br />MOORE: And I&rsquo;m Natalie Moore at our Side South bureau. The situation was different in a 3rd Ward precinct along East 47th Street. Voters didn&rsquo;t take aim at all liquor. They had specific targets: Night Train, Wild Irish Rose, Thunderbird &mdash; cheap, fortified wines that some residents say attracted low-end elements to the neighborhood. The referendum was nonbinding, nothing more than an opinion poll. Still, the majority voted to ban fortified wines at two stores. No more malt liquor either. But one of the stores took 22-ounce malt liquor off the shelves in July.<br /><br />MICHELIS: Took a hit on sales, between $20,000-$25,000 a month, but I gained it from the wines I put in the store.<br /><br />MOORE: Steve Michelis owns a store called 200 Cut Rate Liquors. Michelis says voters got what they wanted. He says the loitering and begging in front of his place stopped last year. Still, he didn&rsquo;t mind last month&rsquo;s referendum.<br /><br />MICHELIS: I don&rsquo;t care. I don&rsquo;t have anything to hide.<br /><br />MOORE: Maybe another reason Michelis didn&rsquo;t mind so much was because he was already getting other pressure &mdash; from Ald. Pat Dowell (3rd).<br /><br />DOWELL: You have people who stand outside, they drink it, they throw the can down, they beg for money or they go back in and get some money from somewhere and go back and buy another can.<br /><br />MOORE: Residents targeted Aristo Food and Liquor on the ballot, too. While residents gathered signatures for the nonbinding referendum, Dowell had her own approach. She&rsquo;s been working on getting the owners to sign agreements to stop selling the cheap liquor. She&rsquo;ll then attach them to their liquor licenses with the city. That would make them binding. The owner of Aristo says he plans to comply with Dowell. But the alderman says she&rsquo;s still waiting to hear back from him. Reporting from the city&rsquo;s South Side, I&rsquo;m Natalie Moore.<br /><br />YOUSEF: And I&rsquo;m Odette Yousef. Here on the North Side, one alderman and some voters are not on the same page. And, the issue isn&rsquo;t liquor. It&rsquo;s land use.<br /><br />GLAZIER: There&rsquo;s going to be three large driveways next to each other.<br /><br />YOUSEF: This is Josh Glazier.<br /><br />GLAZIER: Two for trucks coming in and out of the project, and one for several hundred cars that are going to remain inside the building.<br /><br />YOUSEF: Glazier lives behind this unused hospital garage in Lincoln Park. He&rsquo;s not happy about a developer&rsquo;s plan to turn it into a grocery store.<br /><br />GLAZIER: The community really objects to the grocer and the trucks.<br /><br />YOUSEF: Glazier says Ald. Vi Daley (43rd) has heard him out. He and others recall her saying she&rsquo;d stay neutral until the community reached a consensus on the project. But in spite of overwhelming opposition at public meetings. . .<br /><br />GLAZIER: We&rsquo;ve been hearing for quite some time that the alderman had this secret list, with the names of all the project&rsquo;s supporters and opponents. And increasingly she&rsquo;s been telling us the count was very close. And we didn&rsquo;t feel like a secret list should be the basis for any decision on the project.<br /><br />YOUSEF: So Glazier and fellow opponents gathered signatures to put the issue on their precinct&rsquo;s February ballot.<br /><br />YOUSEF (on the scene): So you knew going into this that this would not be a binding result?<br /><br />GLAZIER: Of course it was not going to be a binding result, but it was going to create some transparency.<br /><br />YOUSEF: And that&rsquo;s what Glazier says he got. Most voters opposed the project at the polls. So he was stunned to hear Ald. Daley&rsquo;s official position just days later. In a statement, she wrote, &ldquo;I will not delay this project any longer and I will vote to approve this project at City Council.&rdquo; Daley said only a narrow majority of voters opposed the development. She said she heard from many ward residents who do want it. They live outside the precinct that voted on it. I asked Prof. Christopher Berry of the University of Chicago if that was a legitimate reason to discount the referendum results:<br /><br />BERRY: Well, it&rsquo;s a legitimate tack to take, but the only way we would really know the answer is to have some sort of scientific public opinion poll that was done, that included everyone in the affected geography.<br /><br />YOUSEF: Berry says referenda are anything but scientific. They&rsquo;re often put together by self-selected groups on one side of an issue. And, usually, only a small fraction of voters come out to decide it. Berry says with referenda, the real story often isn&rsquo;t about how the vote came down. It&rsquo;s that an issue came down to a vote at all.<br /><br />BERRY: When you see a referendum, which means citizens have to be directly making this policy, it suggests some sort of failure or breakdown in the process between the citizens and their representatives.<br /><br />YOUSEF: Berry says those breakdowns are rare because politicians usually want to get reelected. But, in Lincoln Park, that&rsquo;s not the case. Ald. Daley retires in May. On Chicago&rsquo;s North Side, I&rsquo;m Odette Yousef, WBEZ.</p></p> Mon, 14 Mar 2011 11:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/story/200-cut-rate-liquors/winning-referendum-no-silver-bullet 18-year-old aldermanic candidate gets no respect from incumbent http://www.wbez.org/story/26th-ward/18-year-old-aldermanic-candidate-gets-no-respect-incumbent <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/Devon Reid Prepares Flyers at his Campaign Office.JPG" alt="" /><p><p>Politicians around the city are making their final push for votes in Chicago's mayoral and aldermanic races. The 26th ward on the city's west side is home to something of a David and Goliath story with an 18-year-old going up against an experienced politician. Though this David is unlikely to beat Goliath.<br /><br />It's Saturday afternoon just a couple days before the election and 2548 W. Division is all closed up.&nbsp; There are rolling shutters over the windows as well as the door.&nbsp; This is Alderman Roberto Maldonado's campaign office and it's not exactly a beehive of activity right now though Maldonado doesn't have much of a political challenge in this race.<br /><br />REID: My name is Devon Reid.&nbsp; I'm running for alderman in the 26th ward.&nbsp; I'm 18, I'm at Wright College.&nbsp; I'm studying to be a high school history teacher.<br /><br />Reid is standing in the community room of the public library in Humboldt Park where he's set out some literature.<br /><br />He hands me a flyer and says he knows there's a mistake.<br /><br />His bullet point on using Tax Increment Financing to support schools. It's listed twice.<br /><br />But Reid doesn't want to waste all the copies he's made so all the flyers will be put in mailboxes.<br /><br />He stands at the front of the room ready to make his pitch to voters but no one shows up.<br /><br />It doesn't seem to phase him though because of the time he's spent out in the ward.<br /><br />REID: I always get a very positive response.&nbsp; A lot of people are tired of the way things are going here in Chicago and in the ward.<br /><br />Reid looks down at a map of the ward and shows me where he's been focussing his time.<br />&nbsp;<br />REID:&nbsp; In areas like the 19th precinct, that's a very progressive area.&nbsp; There's a green party candidate that ran for state senator in 2010 and he got 40 percent of the vote in the 19th precinct, the 34th, the 51st, and those all have very high voter turnout.&nbsp; Those are some of the highest in the ward and they're very progressive apparently if they're voting for a green party candidate.<br /><br />Reid is hoping some of those voters will be more inclined to vote for him rather than a well-established politician like Maldonado.<br /><br />Maldonado was a Cook County commissioner for 15 years before being appointed to the City Council by Mayor Richard Daley in 2009.<br /><br />Maldonado has $200,000 to spend while Reid has a little more than $3,000 in cash and in kind contributions.<br /><br />Reid says most of his financial support actually comes from the foster family that he's lived with for the last 5 years after his grandmother died.<br /><br />Despite Maldonado's huge advantage in the race, perhaps because of it, he's been unwilling to engage Reid.<br /><br />For example, at a candidate's forum in January sponsored by the Organization of Palmer Square, Maldonado told organizers he wouldn't speak to the crowd with Reid in the room.<br /><br />REID: And so he asked them to make me leave for him to speak and they politely brought me over to the side and told me that they did want him to speak and if I'd just step outside of the room and then I can come back in after he's done talking.&nbsp; I didn't want to cause a huge scene and I didn't want to seem unprofessional so I went ahead and walked out of the room.&nbsp; Maldonado stepped to the front and then they closed the door because I couldn't even see him speak. <br /><br />Maldonado did not return calls for this story and in fact, things got a little weird as I sought an interview. <br /><br />A woman who answered the phone at his campaign office even hung up on me, twice.<br /><br />When I stopped by the office, another volunteer, Chris Johnson, who had taken a message by phone earlier in the day, said he'd pass another message on to Maldonado, but said they were pretty busy and he wasn't sure the message would get through.<br /><br />And he insisted there was no one else I should talk to about getting an interview.<br /><br />BARNES: My name is Bruce Barnes and I have stumbled into the position of being Devon Reid's campaign manager.<br /><br />Barnes met Reid when Reid was going door to door around the neighborhood collecting petitions to get on the ballot.<br /><br />Barnes says he was immediately impressed and he's been helping ever since and he says whatever happens on Tuesday, the campaign has already had an impact.<br /><br />BARNES: We had an alderman that was appointed by the mayor that we hadn't heard from the entire time he had been an alderman and as soon as he got word that Devon was on the ballot, in a one month period we got four or five different flyers in the mail and we had people knocking on our doors and his signs went up all over the neighborhood.<br /><br />Back at the library, standing in an empty room Reid says there probably is a correlation between how many people showed up for his forum and how many will vote for him.<br /><br />But he says win or lose, this won't be his last time running for office.<br /><br />He gathers up his flyers, errors and all, and heads out to a carefully chosen precinct to talk to some more voters.</p></p> Mon, 21 Feb 2011 05:44:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/story/26th-ward/18-year-old-aldermanic-candidate-gets-no-respect-incumbent