WBEZ | Saudi Arabia http://www.wbez.org/tags/saudi-arabia Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Worldview: January 22, 2016 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-22/worldview-january-22-2016-114583 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Iran-Pakistan.jpg" title="Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, right, talks with Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif during their meeting in Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/243300801&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;">Pakistan mediates diplomatic crisis in Middle East</span><br />Relations between Saudi Arabia and Iran have been strained ever since Saudi Arabia executed a Shiite cleric earlier this month. That move led to protests in Iran and Saudi Arabia recalling its Ambassador from Tehran. Now, Pakistan has made a move to help mediate a reconciliation between the two countries. Earlier this week &nbsp;Nawaz Sharif, the prime minister of Pakistan, went to Riyadh in an attempt to ease tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran. We&rsquo;ll take a look at why Pakistan has decided to take on the role of mediator with Alex Vatanka, senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and Jamestown Foundation.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong> Alex Vatanka is a senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and Jamestown Foundation.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Zulu%20Dawn%201.jpg" title="The original movie poster for the 1979 film, Zulu Dawn (Courtesy of Samarkand)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/243300797&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;">Zulu Dawn and the 137th anniversary of the Battle of Isandlwana</span><br />On January 22nd, 1879, Zulu tribesmen slaughtered British forces at the Battle of Isandlwana, in present-day South Africa. <em>Zulu Dawn</em>, a 1979 film that dramatizes the events, stars Peter O&rsquo;Toole and Burt Lancaster. Comedian Aaron Freeman says he used to have an annual viewing party to mark the Battle of Isandlwana because it&rsquo;s one time when the colonized beat the colonizers. For the 137th anniversary of the Battle, WBEZ film contributor and director of Facets Multimedia, Milos Stehlik, joins Freeman to discuss <em>Zulu Dawn</em> with the film&rsquo;s co-producer, Nate Kohn, currently professor of entertainment &amp; media studies at the University of Georgia.</p><p dir="ltr">Guest: Milos Stehlik, is the director of Facets Multimedia.<br />Guest: &nbsp;Aaron Freeman is a comedian.<br />Guest: &nbsp;Nate Kohn is a filmmaker and co-producer of <em>Zulu Dawn</em></p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Weekend%20Passport-rick-schoogirls-iran.jpg" title="Rick Steves with schoolgirls in Iran. (Courtesy of Rick Steves)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/243300794&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;">Weekend Passport: Rick Steves on how, why and where to travel</span><br />Each week global citizen Nari Safavi helps listeners plan their global weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll get a little help from travel guru Rick Steves, who helps listeners plan more than just an international weekend. Steves is in Chicago for the 2016 Chicago Travel and Adventure Show.</p><p>Guest: Nari Safavi is &nbsp;co-founder of Pasfarda Arts and Cultural Exchange.<br />Guest: Rick Steves is a travel writer and &nbsp;host of <em>Rick Steves&rsquo; Europe</em>.</p></p> Fri, 22 Jan 2016 17:02:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-22/worldview-january-22-2016-114583 Iran accuses Saudis of attacking its Yemen embassy http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-08/iran-accuses-saudis-attacking-its-yemen-embassy-114420 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/010816%20IRAN-SAUDIS%20CMS_0.jpg" title="Iranian worshippers attend rally to protest execution of Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, a prominent opposition Saudi Shiite cleric, after Friday prayers in Tehran, Iran, Jan. 8, 2016. Thousands of worshippers carried pictures of al-Nimr chanting ‘death to Al Saud’ referencing the kingdom's royal family. The poster reads: ’We all sacrifice for you Islam’. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241011972&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 24px;">Iran accuses Saudis of targeting its Yemen embassy in airstrike</span></strong></p><p>The diplomatic crisis between Saudi Arabia and Iran took another downward turn when Iran accused Saudi Arabia of deliberately targeting its Yemen embassy in an airstrike. Recent hostilities began between the countries after Saudi Arabia executed noted Shi&rsquo;a cleric, Nimr al-Nimr. In response, Iranian protesters charged and damaged the Saudi embassy in Tehran. We&rsquo;ll get more on the brewing situation with Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan. His blog is Informed Comment and he&rsquo;s author most recently of the book, The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East.</p><p><strong>GUESTS:</strong> <a href="http://www.juancole.com/">Juan Cole</a> is Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate professor of history at the University of Michigan and author of the book, <em>The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East</em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241012414&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><strong>Weekend Passport: Peruvian opera, &ldquo;Bel Canto&rdquo;</strong></span></p><p>Each week, global citizen, Nari Safavi, helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week he&rsquo;ll tell us about an opera inspired by the Peruvian hostage crisis of 1996. Bel Canto is currently running at Lyric Opera in Chicago.</p><p><strong>GUESTS:</strong></p><p>Nari Safavi is co-founder of <a href="http://www.pasfarda.org/">Pasfarda Arts and Cultural Exchange</a></p><p><a href="http://www.jimmylopez.com/">Jimmy Lopez</a> is the composer of the opera, &#39;Bel Canto&#39;</p><p><a href="https://www.lyricopera.org/concertstickets/calendar/2015-2016/productions/lyricopera/bel-canto">&#39;Bel Canto&#39;</a> is playing at the Lyric Opera of Chicago through Sunday, Jnauary 17, 2016</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/241012735&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><strong>Milos Stehlik reviews films, &lsquo;The Revenant&rsquo; and &lsquo;Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict&rsquo;</strong></span></p><p>WBEZ Film contributor, Milos Stehlik, joins us to talk about films showing this weekend, including &ldquo;The Revenant,&rdquo; starring Leonardo DiCaprio and a new film about Peggy Guggenheim, the art collector known for her modern art collection, called &ldquo;Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict&rdquo;.</p><p><em>Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict is playing at Music Box Theatre</em></p><p><strong>GUESTS:</strong> Milos Stehlik is WBEZ&rsquo;s film contributor and director of <a href="http://www.facets.org">Facets Multimedia</a>.</p></p> Fri, 08 Jan 2016 09:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-08/iran-accuses-saudis-attacking-its-yemen-embassy-114420 Saudi Arabia-Iran crisis deepens http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-05/saudi-arabia-iran-crisis-deepens-114383 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Sadri%20Big%20small.jpg" title="In this Sunday, Jan. 3, 2016 file photo, Iranian and Turkish demonstrators hold pictures of Shiite cleric Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr as they protest outside the Saudi Embassy in Ankara, Turkey. Diplomatic tensions between Saudi Arabia and Iran, which began with the kingdom’s execution of al-Nimr and later saw attacks on Saudi diplomatic posts in the Islamic Republic, have seen countries around the world respond. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici, File)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240544135&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Fallout between Saudi Arabia and Iran deepens</strong></span></p><p>The fallout from the diplomatic crisis between Saudi Arabia and Iran continues to spread across the Middle East. Kuwait is the latest country to take sides. The country recalled its Ambassador from Tehran. The crisis began after Saudi Arabia executed a Shiite cleric over the weekend, leading to protests in Iran and fires at the Saudi embassy in Iran.&nbsp; Saudi Arabia then severed diplomatic ties with Iran. There are concerns the ongoing crisis will lead to more sectarian violence in the region.&nbsp; We&rsquo;ll examine the root causes of the row with Ahmad Sadri, a professor of sociology and anthropology at Lake Forest College.</p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong> <a href="https://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/faculty/sadri/">Ahmad Sadri</a> is a<a href="http://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/faculty/sadri/"> professor of sociology and anthropology</a> at Lake Forest College<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240544819&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Could militant attacks jeopardize India&rsquo;s relations with Pakistan and Afghanistan?</strong></span></p><p>Pakistan&rsquo;s government says it&rsquo;s using info provided by India to investigate Saturday attacks by militants on an Indian air force base near their shared border. The assault killed seven Indian security personnel. The incident comes as the rival nations move towards &ldquo;reconciliation talks&rdquo;. Islamabad wants the talks to go forward, but New Delhi is waiting on the investigation and Pakistan&rsquo;s response. India suspects the attack was planned by the Pakistani militant group, Jaish-e-Mohammed. Also on Saturday, attackers died in a gunfight at an airfield in the town of Pathankot - also on the India/Pakistan border. And on Monday, Afghan President, Ashraf Ghani, briefed Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, on an attack on the Indian consulate in the Afghan city of Mazar-e-Sharif. Sumit Ganguly is professor of Indian Cultures and Civilizations and director of the Center on American and Global Security at Indiana University-Bloomington. He&rsquo;ll share his thoughts on the skirmishes and what they could mean for India&rsquo;s relations with Pakistan and Afghanistan.</p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong> <a href="http://polisci.indiana.edu/faculty/profiles/sganguly.shtml">Sumit Ganguly</a>, professor of Indian Cultures and Civilizations and director of the Center on American and Global Security at Indiana University-Bloomington<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240545646&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Can Ukraine and Russia reach Compromise?</strong></span></p><p>Ukraine says it plans to ask the United Nations (UN) for a peacekeeping mission in the Donbass region in the country&rsquo;s East &ndash; the setting for ongoing fighting between government forces and Russian-backed rebels.&nbsp; Russia recently banned the import of some Ukrainian foods. In response, Ukraine issued its own ban on Russian goods. We&rsquo;ll ask Anders Aslund, if there is any room for compromise. He&rsquo;s senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and author of the book, <em>Ukraine: What Went Wrong and How to Fix It</em>.</p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong> <a href="http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/about/experts/list/anders-aslund">Anders Aslund</a> is a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council. He&rsquo;s the author of <em>Ukraine. What Went Wrong and How to Fix It.</em><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240546402&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Prisoner of the Week: Chicagoan, Alie Kabba, denied bail in Sierra Leone</strong></span></p><p>Ali Kabba, former executive director of the Chicago-based United Africa Organization, is currently imprisoned in Sierra Leone. Kabba is seeking to run for President in the country. Arrested on charges of bigamy in early December, Kabba has been an outspoken critic of the current government. His campaign declares the charges false. Yesterday, after a court appearance, he was denied bail. We&rsquo;ll talk about the charges against Kabba with Kobe William, Chicagoland regional campaign manager for Alie Kabba.</p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong> Kobe (Koe bee) William is the Chicagoland regional campaign manager for Ali Kabba. Kabba is running for president of Sierra Leone.</p></p> Tue, 05 Jan 2016 13:08:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-05/saudi-arabia-iran-crisis-deepens-114383 Who Was the Shiite Sheikh Executed by Saudi Arabia? http://www.wbez.org/news/who-was-shiite-sheikh-executed-saudi-arabia-114370 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/nimr-al-nimr-596f61b34113a22e2ef9fb546ca855ad30090afd.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res461918222" previewtitle="An Iraqi protester holds a poster of Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed in Saudi Arabia, during a protest Monday in front of the gate of the Green Zone in Baghdad."><div data-crop-type="" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="An Iraqi protester holds a poster of Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed in Saudi Arabia, during a protest Monday in front of the gate of the Green Zone in Baghdad." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/04/nimr-al-nimr_custom-7c26ccfff68e0b708164aebbb23f5ecfe3863bc1-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="An Iraqi protester holds a poster of Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed in Saudi Arabia, during a protest Monday in front of the gate of the Green Zone in Baghdad. (Ali Abbas/EPA /Landov)" /></div><div><div><p>Saudi Arabia&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2016/01/02/461754062/saudi-arabia-executes-47-including-prominent-cleric">execution of leading Shiite cleric Nimr al-Nimr</a>&nbsp;on Saturday<a href="http://www.npr.org/2016/01/02/461754062/saudi-arabia-executes-47-including-prominent-cleric">&nbsp;</a>sparked a violent protest at the Saudi Embassy in Iran&#39;s capital, Tehran. Saudi Arabia then quickly severed ties with its longtime regional rival.</p></div></div></div><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/04/461890063/bahrain-joins-saudi-arabia-cutting-diplomatic-ties-with-iran">As the broader Middle East reacts</a>&nbsp;to the dramatic deterioration in relations between the two countries, which have long been strained, here&#39;s a look at who Nimr was.</p><p>The cleric was an outspoken critic of the Saudi government, calling for more rights for the country&#39;s marginalized Shiite community.</p><p>Saudi Arabian Shias say they&#39;re treated like &quot;second-class citizens because they don&#39;t conform to the strict Sunni interpretation of Islam that defines the nation,&quot;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/05/09/405415756/saudi-shiites-fear-a-backlash-from-neighbor-yemen">as NPR&#39;s Leila Fadel reported</a>&nbsp;from a mostly Shiite province in Saudi Arabia last year. &quot;They can&#39;t hold high-ranking government or military positions, and they can&#39;t teach religion in public schools,&quot; Leila said.</p><p>&quot;From the day I was born and to this day, I&#39;ve never felt safe or secure in this country,&quot; Nimr said in a speech in 2011. &quot;We are not loyal to other countries or authorities, nor are we loyal to this country. What is this country? The regime that oppresses me? The regime that steals my money, sheds my blood, and violates my honor?&quot;</p><p>Leila says the Saudi government has portrayed Nimr as a violent radical loyal to Iran. Here&#39;s more from Leila:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;He spent some 15 years in exile, returning in the mid-90s.&nbsp;<br /><br />&quot;After that, he was in and out of prison for calling for free elections and at one point he suggested that the Shia majority eastern province, Qatif, secede from Saudi Arabia if demands weren&#39;t met.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>Nimr played a major role in demonstrations by Saudi&#39;s Shias in the wake of the so-called Arab Spring. At a protest in July 2012, he was arrested after being shot in the leg by police.</p><p>&quot;The cleric represents a more radical strain among Saudi Shiites, who feel the community&#39;s established leaders have failed to make headway with ending what they see as systematic discrimination,&quot;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-saudi-arrest-idUSBRE8670GH20120708">Reuters reported following Nimr&#39;s arrest</a>.</p><p><a href="https://wikileaks.org/plusd/cables/08RIYADH1283_a.html">According to a purported cable released by WikiLeaks</a>, a State Department official met with Nimr in 2008 in his hometown of Awamiyya, where Nimr said he was &quot;against the idea that Saudi Shi&#39;a should expect Iranian support based on some idea of sectarian unity that supersedes national politics.&quot; Here&#39;s more from the cable:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;Al-Nimr is currently gaining popularity locally, particularly with young people, as his words appeal to those disaffected by the general economic malaise experienced by Saudi Arabia&#39;s lower classes and a perceived lack of sufficient [Saudi Arabian Government] reform in relations with the Shi&#39;a community. Meanwhile, at a national and international level, with everyone from Salafi sheikhs to regional intelligence agencies, al-Nimr&#39;s words have gained him increased notoriety due to fears that his words will spark unrest and perhaps point to an Iranian hand in Saudi Arabia.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>Years later, &quot;he would differ with Iran on the subject of Syria ... [and] he denounced the oppression of the Syrian regime, even though it&#39;s backed by Tehran,&quot; Leila reported.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/2014/10/18/357108117/saudi-clerics-death-sentence-focuses-shia-anger-on-ruling-family">Nimr was sentenced to death</a>&nbsp;in a closed trial on charges such as being disloyal to the ruling family, using violence and seeking foreign meddling. The case was widely criticized by rights groups.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/03/461862259/saudi-arabia-iran-face-off-as-sectarian-tensions-escalate-after-executions">As NPR&#39;s Deborah Amos reported</a>, Nimr&#39;s execution &quot;came as a surprise to many in Saudi, but the Saudi leadership was well aware of likely turbulent reactions.&quot; This is how one Gulf analyst described what motivated Saudi here:</p><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;&#39;Carrying out the death sentence on Nimr sends a strong message to Saudi Arabia&#39;s aggrieved Shiite minority that Iran has no say in internal Saudi decisions and domestic dissent has limits.&#39;</em></p><p><em>&#39;There is also a calculation,&#39; says the analyst, &#39;the Saudis want to consolidate their alliances in the region &mdash; that would lead to a stark choice between the two sides.&#39; &quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/04/461912757/who-was-the-shiite-sheikh-executed-by-saudi-arabia?ft=nprml&amp;f=461912757" target="_blank"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></p> Mon, 04 Jan 2016 15:56:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/who-was-shiite-sheikh-executed-saudi-arabia-114370 Saudi Arabia and Iran: Here's How Their Feud Could Escalate http://www.wbez.org/news/saudi-arabia-and-iran-heres-how-their-feud-could-escalate-114369 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ap_536552069669_custom-0f70519f7df98ab8092e0ad1b2229807d46d6938-s700-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res461932953" previewtitle="Saudi Arabia's King Salman, shown on Dec. 9 in the capital Riyadh. Saudi Arabia has cut ties with its long-time rival Iran, a development that could complicate many of the existing problems in the Middle East."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Saudi Arabia's King Salman, shown on Dec. 9 in the capital Riyadh. Saudi Arabia has cut ties with its long-time rival Iran, a development that could complicate many of the existing problems in the Middle East." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/04/ap_536552069669_custom-0f70519f7df98ab8092e0ad1b2229807d46d6938-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 423px; width: 620px;" title="Saudi Arabia's King Salman, shown on Dec. 9 in the capital Riyadh. Saudi Arabia has cut ties with its long-time rival Iran, a development that could complicate many of the existing problems in the Middle East. (Khalid Mohammed/AP)" /></div><div><div><p>In a Middle East already aflame,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/03/461862259/saudi-arabia-iran-face-off-as-sectarian-tensions-escalate-after-executions" target="_blank">a fresh feud</a>&nbsp;between Saudi Arabia and Iran threatens to complicate most every major issue from the Iranian nuclear deal to the Syrian civil war to global oil markets.</p></div></div></div><p>These are all U.S. priorities and the Obama administration finds itself staring at another Middle Eastern conundrum.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.politico.com/story/2016/01/iran-saudi-arabia-us-syria-217318" target="_blank">White House spokesman Josh Earnest</a>&nbsp;on Monday called on Iran and Saudi Arabia to exercise restraint and offered mild criticism of both.</p><p>His language pointed to the difficult position facing the administration. If the U.S. sides openly with its long-time ally Saudi Arabia, it will antagonize Iran, where President Obama has sought to move past decades of relentless hostility.</p><p>Yet if the White House opts for a balanced approach, Saudi Arabia could take it as an insult, feeling its close relationship with Washington is being sacrificed as part of U.S. outreach to Iran.</p><p>Saudi Arabia sees itself as the standard bearer of Sunni Islam and Iran regards itself as the defender of Shiite Muslims everywhere.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35221569" target="_blank">Their sectarian competition</a>&nbsp;has been&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2007/02/12/7332087/the-origins-of-the-shiite-sunni-split" target="_blank">a fundamental fault line in the Middle East</a>&nbsp;for decades.</p><p>In broad strokes, the rivalry ramped up dramatically after&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2007/02/14/7392405/export-of-irans-revolution-spawns-violence" target="_blank">Iran&#39;s 1979 Islamic Revolution</a>&nbsp;and its efforts to export its brand of radical Islam among Shiites, a minority in the Muslim world that often feels oppressed by the far larger Sunni population. As Iran has sought greater influence, Sunnis have pushed back.</p><p>The rivalry has only intensified during the Middle East uprisings of the past several years, with the Saudis and Iranians waging proxy battles on multiple fronts.</p><p>The latest friction comes at a key moment for both states. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was elected in 2013 with a pledge to open up his country to the outside world, revive the economy and pursue at least limited social reforms.</p><p>Saudi Arabia&#39;s King Salman ascended the throne just last year and has shown signs of acting in a more decisive manner than his predecessors. His boldest move has been a bombing campaign in Yemen, where the Saudis and Iran are on opposite sides of that country&#39;s war.</p><p>Here are several other places where the Saudi-Iranian friction is likely to play out:</p><div id="res461930231"><div><div>&nbsp;</div></div></div><p><strong>Syria&#39;s Cease-Fire Talks:&nbsp;</strong>This may be the most immediate casualty, with the already slim chances for a truce in Syria now facing even longer odds, according to Ali Ansari, a history professor specializing in Iran at St. Andrews University in Scotland. The discussions set for Jan. 25 in Geneva are now likely to be &quot;delayed, if not shelved,&quot; he said in an interview on Monday.</p><p>Just last month, the Saudi and Iranian foreign ministers both took part in<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/05/world/middleeast/bahrain-sudan-united-arab-emirates-join-diplomatic-feud-against-iran.html?hp&amp;action=click&amp;pgtype=Homepage&amp;clickSource=story-heading&amp;module=first-column-region&amp;region=top-news&amp;WT.nav=top-news&amp;_r=0" target="_blank">&nbsp;high-level talks in New York</a>&nbsp;on the Syrian war, and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry hailed it as an important step.</p><p>But Iran and Saudi are on opposite sides in the Syrian war, one of their main battlegrounds, and will be less inclined to compromise in the current atmosphere. For Persian Iran, Syrian President Bashar Assad is their most important Arab ally and they have propped him up since the uprising against him began nearly five years ago. Assad is an Alawite, which is an offshoot of Shiite Islam.</p><p>The Saudis, in turn, believe their fellow Sunnis, who make up the majority in Syria, should run the country. The Saudis are part of the U.S.-led coalition and have supported opposition factions in Syria throughout the war.</p><p><strong>The Oil Market:&nbsp;</strong>Saudi Arabia is the world&#39;s largest oil exporter and could cut production to push up prices that have fallen below $40 a barrel, down from more than $100 in the summer of 2014.</p><p>But Saudi has made clear it&#39;s willing to endure the pain of lower oil prices. Why? According to analysts, at least part of the Saudi calculation is that it doesn&#39;t want to help Iran, which is anticipating the lifting of international sanctions that will allow it resume as a major player in the oil market.</p><p>The Saudis are betting that their large cash reserves will allow them to hold out longer and retain their current share of the market compared to Iran and other countries that have much weaker economies.</p><p>If this analysis proves accurate, then oil production is likely to remain high and world prices low. But there&#39;s always the risk that one of the Middle East&#39;s many conflicts could disrupt the flow of oil, cutting supplies and pushing up prices. That hasn&#39;t happened, but the Saudis and the Iranians both export through the crowded waterways of the Gulf.</p><div id="res461933799" previewtitle="Iranian women in the capital Tehran demonstrate against the execution of a prominent Shiite Muslim cleric Nimr al-Nimr (seen on the signs). He was among 47 people beheaded by Saudi authorities on Saturday, a move that escalated tensions between the two countries."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Iranian women in the capital Tehran demonstrate against the execution of a prominent Shiite Muslim cleric Nimr al-Nimr (seen on the signs). He was among 47 people beheaded by Saudi authorities on Saturday, a move that escalated tensions between the two countries." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/04/gettyimages-503342552_custom-032fd55d65f2baab578193933fd6157b6e8d80be-s700-c85.jpg" style="height: 391px; width: 620px;" title="Iranian women in the capital Tehran demonstrate against the execution of a prominent Shiite Muslim cleric Nimr al-Nimr, as seen on the signs. He was among 47 people beheaded by Saudi authorities on Saturday, a move that escalated tensions between the two countries. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)" /></div><div><div><p><strong>Iran Nuclear Deal:</strong>&nbsp;The early signs on the deal between Iran and six world powers have been mostly positive. Iran has been scaling back its nuclear program at a pace that exceeds what many expected. The country could meet the targets as soon as this month, which would trigger &quot;implementation day,&quot; meaning many sanctions would be lifted and Iran would start to get some $100 billion in oil revenues that has been withheld.</p></div></div></div><p>However, Iran has also staged ballistic missile tests, arguing this is not part of the nuclear deal.</p><p>This has prompted critics of the nuclear pact to renew their objections. And Saudi Arabia, along with Israel&#39;s government and conservatives in the U.S., have been the leading opponents of the deal. They may not be in a position to derail it. But even if the agreement stays on track, it may not build confidence if other disputes in the region keep tensions running high.</p><p>Many Iranians have high hopes that end of sanctions will improve their quality of life. But if that doesn&#39;t happen, the deal could then be blamed for ongoing problems.</p><p><strong>Domestic Politics:&nbsp;</strong>The Saudi and Iranian actions can also be viewed through the lens of their own domestic politics. Saudi Arabia&#39;s execution of 47 people on Saturday was, in many Saudi eyes, part of a crackdown of domestic extremists who could potentially threaten the monarchy.</p><p>In Iran, hardliners are preparing for parliamentary elections next month against moderates allied with President Hassan Rouhani. The hardliners seized on the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/02/461753992/saudi-arabias-killing-of-leading-shiite-cleric-and-46-others-sparks-outcry" target="_blank">Saudi execution of a prominent Shiite cleric</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/04/461912757/who-was-the-shiite-sheikh-executed-by-saudi-arabia" target="_blank">Nimr al-Nimr</a>, as a way to whip up support among their supporters at home.</p><p>&quot;The biggest losers in the last 24 hours are Rouhani and the moderate wing in Iran,&quot; says Salman Shaikh, the former head of the Brookings Center in Doha, Qatar, who now runs a private consultancy.</p><p>Hardliners are hoping to make big gains in the elections and block Rouhani and other moderates from promoting reforms, he added.</p><p><a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/01/04/461896683/saudi-arabia-and-iran-heres-how-their-feud-could-escalate?ft=nprml&amp;f=461896683" target="_blank"><em>&mdash; via NPR</em></a></p></p> Mon, 04 Jan 2016 15:32:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/saudi-arabia-and-iran-heres-how-their-feud-could-escalate-114369 Diplomatic row between Saudi Arabia and Iran http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-04/diplomatic-row-between-saudi-arabia-and-iran-114365 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Saudi%20Arabia%202.jpg" title="An Iranian woman holds up a poster showing Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, a prominent opposition Saudi Shiite cleric who was executed last week by Saudi Arabia, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, Jan. 4, 2016. Allies of Saudi Arabia followed the Kingdom's lead and began scaling back diplomatic ties to Iran after the ransacking of Saudi diplomatic missions in the Islamic Republic, violence sparked by the Saudi execution of al-Nimr. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)" /><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240397350&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Saudi Arabia executions</strong></span></p><p>According to Human Rights Watch, Saudi Arabia carried out its largest mass execution in the country since 1980, when it put 47 men to death on January 2<sup>nd</sup>, 2016. Among those executed was Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, a prominent Shia cleric whose death has sparked a diplomatic crisis in the Middle East. We&rsquo;ll take a look at what&rsquo;s behind the rise in executions in Saudi Arabia with Sarah Leah Whitson, executive director of Human Rights Watch&#39;s Middle East and North Africa Division.</p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.hrw.org/about/people/sarah-leah-whitson">Sarah Leah Whitson</a> is executive director of Human Rights Watch&#39;s Middle East and North Africa Division<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240398881&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Saudi Arabia - Iran diplomatic row</strong></span></p><p>Violent protests in Shi&rsquo;a-dominated Iran over the execution in Saudi Arabia of a Shiite cleric have led to recriminations by the Saudi Kingdom. The Saudis officially severed ties with Iran and ordered Iranian diplomats to leave the country. Despite having a majority Shi&rsquo;a population, the Sunni-ruled country of Bahrain also announced it would cut diplomatic ties with Iran. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) said it would &ldquo;reduce&rdquo; its diplomatic presence in Iran as well. We&rsquo;ll talk about the growing diplomatic row in the Middle East with Joe Kechichian, senior writer for the Dubai-based Gulf News. He&rsquo;s author of numerous books on the Gulf region, including his most recent release, <em>Iffat al Thunayan: An Arabian Queen.</em></p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong>&nbsp;<a href="http://gulfnews.com/opinion/thinkers/joseph-kechichian">Joseph Kechichian</a> is a senior writer for the Dubai-based Gulf News<em><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/240399202&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></em></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>What&#39;s ahead for the UN in 2016?</strong></span></p><p>In 2016, the United Nations (UN) is expected to undergo some big changes. It will elect a new Secretary-General and try to implement the Climate Change agreement from Paris, among other things. In a recent article in <em>The Nation</em>, Barbara Crossette writes about some challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for the international body. She joins us to talk about what kinds of changes she believes are needed to &ldquo;rejuvenate&rdquo; the 70 year-old UN, highlighted in her article, &ldquo;In 2016, the UN Will Be Transformed. Will That Be Enough to Bring it Back to Life?&rdquo;</p><p><strong>GUEST:</strong>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.thenation.com/authors/barbara-crossette/">Barbara Crossette</a> is UN correspondent for <em>The Nation</em></p></p> Mon, 04 Jan 2016 09:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2016-01-04/diplomatic-row-between-saudi-arabia-and-iran-114365 After Historic Elections in Saudi Arabia, What's the Future for Women? http://www.wbez.org/news/after-historic-elections-saudi-arabia-whats-future-women-114230 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ap_603279723628_custom-9103137ed0c5e46bef8f9209302cc964c690ddc3-s600-c85.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="storytext"><div id="res459492391"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Saudi women vote at a polling center during municipal elections, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Saturday. Saudi women are heading to polling stations across the kingdom, both as voters and candidates, for the first time in this landmark election." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/12/ap_603279723628_custom-9103137ed0c5e46bef8f9209302cc964c690ddc3-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 435px; width: 620px;" title="Saudi women vote at a polling center during municipal elections, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on Saturday. Saudi women are heading to polling stations across the kingdom, both as voters and candidates, for the first time in this landmark election. (Aya Batrawy/AP)" /></div><div><div><p>In municipal council races in Saudi Arabia a week ago,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/12/14/459683623/saudi-women-elections-are-one-step-forward-on-a-long-road">21 female candidates were elected to office</a>. In the country&#39;s third-ever elections, the monarchy gave women the right to vote, as well as to seek election to office.</p></div></div></div><p>Nearly 1,000 women ran throughout the country, but while there were 1.36 million men registered to vote, according to the&nbsp;Wall Street Journal, only 130,000 women could vote.</p><p>NPR&#39;s Rachel Martin and Marisa Peñaloza traveled to Saudi Arabia ahead of the election to find out how women were reacting to their new rights and how they&#39;ve been living.</p><div><hr /></div><p><strong>One candidate&#39;s view</strong></p><div id="res459492972"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Haifa Alhababi, architect and candidate in the election." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/12/haifa-edit_custom-0f037749a7696972299693be29386386795b708b-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Haifa Alhababi, architect and candidate in the election. (Mohammed Al-Khawajah for NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>Haifa Alhababi is an architect and university teacher. She also was one of the women vying for a spot on one of the municipal councils.</p></div></div></div><blockquote><div><p><em>&quot;First of all, I was curious to know what&#39;s happening.</em></p><p><em>&quot;Like, I went to the balloting workshop ... if it&#39;s like, really beneficial or if it&#39;s like, because I have this idea from living abroad that this is about, this is a major step, and who runs here?</em></p><p><em>&quot;But for myself I don&#39;t want to be, like, a politician &mdash; I&#39;m not a politician, I&#39;m an architect. So I wanted just to be sure. Is it work like outside, or its something different here? So thank God that I went to this workshop and I realized that it&#39;s more about local issues that we really face.&quot;</em></p></div></blockquote><p>Alhababi, who had studied abroad in the U.K. and who also had lived in Texas for some time, said the country&#39;s standing in the world is not where some would like to hope.</p><p>&quot;I always said that they call us &#39;developing country&#39; because we have the oil &mdash; but we are not a developing country, we are still a third-world country,&quot; she said. &quot;So to deal with this mentality, to deal with these people, to deal with this system here, you need to work on the ground, not just to lecture and say words and that&#39;s it.&quot;</p><p>Alhababi is optimistic about her generation&#39;s future.</p><p>&quot;I believe that we&#39;re gonna create change,&quot; she says. &quot;When you experience, try something, live it, you understand. So you want to apply it to your country. No one hates their country &mdash; when you come back and live, that means you love your country, so you want to make it better.</p><p>&quot;What&#39;s happening now, for me, it&#39;s not about male and female, it&#39;s about the changing conception of people &mdash; that they try to understand that they should participate in their community. They should understand that, without your participation, the country won&#39;t go any further.&quot;</p><p><strong>What else do Saudi Arabian women need?</strong></p><p><strong><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/459491653/460353506" title="NPR embedded audio player" width="100%"></iframe></strong></p><div id="res459492442"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Aziza Youssef." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/12/azizayousef-marisa_custom-984f572371b66892acbb8e75f28907097d959dc8-s200-c85.jpg" style="height: 226px; width: 210px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Aziza Youssef. (Marisa Penaloza/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>Some women, like Aziza Youssef, don&#39;t see how the election connects to their daily lives.</p></div></div></div><p>&quot;I&#39;m boycotting the election,&quot; she says. &quot;In my point of view, it&#39;s putting backward the women movement for rights. ... This election is just &mdash; it&#39;s for the West, it&#39;s not for us. ... It&#39;s good for our picture in the West.&quot;</p><p>Youssef, a former university lecturer now operating a full-time catering business, says she&#39;s made a name for herself by helping push the Saudi government&nbsp;<a href="http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/05/11/405885958/saudi-women-cant-drive-to-work-so-theyre-flocking-to-the-internet">to remove its ban against women driving</a>. Youssef says while people in the West may think letting women vote is great for women, it&#39;s exactly what the Saudi regime wants the world to think.</p><p>Her daughter, Sarah Alkhalidi, agrees that the elections won&#39;t mean much.</p><p>&quot;It&#39;s like giving me a cashmere sweater when I need a place to sleep &mdash; that&#39;s the analogy I&#39;m using,&quot; she says.</p><p>The thirtysomething mother of three says she wants more control of her daily life.</p><p>&quot;I can&#39;t open a bank account for my children that takes money out of my paycheck and, like, for a savings account for them. I can&#39;t do that &mdash; their dad has to do that,&quot; Alkhalidi says. &quot;So it&#39;s like the whole guardianship issue. ... Even if my guardian tries to renew my passport, I can&#39;t pick it up. He has to pick it up for me. So I feel like these issues are more significant and more &mdash; like they have more influence on my daily life.&quot;</p><p>Guardianship rules dictate how women move around in Saudi society. They move with the permission of men &mdash; either a father, a brother, a husband or a son. Men also act as so-called guardians who oversee women&#39;s choices and escort them in public places.</p><p><strong>Security in Saudi Arabia, and its effect on calling for social change</strong></p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/459491653/460354793" title="NPR embedded audio player" width="100%"></iframe></p><div id="res459495939"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Hala al-Dosari, a visiting scholar at Johns Hopkins University from Saudi Arabia, poses for a portrait in her living room on Dec. 2, at her apartment in Baltimore." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/12/hala-al-dosari-jtsuboike-0013-edit_custom-e247a229efab71633ee1fbf38757ac4d213b0155-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 414px; width: 620px;" title="Hala al-Dosari, a visiting scholar at Johns Hopkins University from Saudi Arabia, poses for a portrait in her living room on Dec. 2, at her apartment in Baltimore. (Jun Tsuboike/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>The recent aggressive response to would-be terrorists in the country has also meant a crackdown on anyone who seems to be speaking out in a way that threatens the regime. That means human rights activists, including Hala al Dosari.</p></div></div></div><p>For the past year al Dosari has been in the United States for a fellowship at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. She also writes about women&#39;s issues for Saudi websites and international media, and as a result has been stigmatized at home as someone who wants to import Western values into Saudi culture.</p><p>She&#39;s supposed to go back home at the end of her fellowship, but she&#39;s afraid.</p><p>&quot;I listen to other activists being summoned for interrogation, and being threatened and being warned and being silenced &mdash; and I don&#39;t want to end up like that,&quot; she says. &quot;So I do feel intimidated. I do feel threatened.&quot;</p><p>She misses her family &mdash; her nieces and nephews especially. But she thinks she can effect more social change in Saudi Arabia from the outside, so she doesn&#39;t know when she&#39;ll go back.</p><p>&quot;I don&#39;t think of it as a price, or as a cost,&quot; she says. &quot;I think it&#39;s whether you want to live aligned with what you believe in. I believe it&#39;s a duty, that everyone should do their part. And I don&#39;t think I&#39;ve paid the price of ... men and women who have been imprisoned &mdash; and still imprisoned for years, for ten years or so &mdash; for stating their opinions.</p><p>&quot;And I&#39;m safe. I&#39;m able to voice my concerns, I live in autonomy, I&#39;m protected.&quot;</p><p><strong>A quiet campaign</strong></p><p>While followers of American elections are familiar with lengthy primary and general elections, the Saudi candidates are under tight restrictions.</p><p>They spoke to NPR reporters only on condition that the material could not be published before election day on Dec. 12. The gag order affects both female and male candidates, but candidates spoke to NPR anyway.</p><p>At one event we attended, we were told we could not record the candidates&#39; statements. Government minders often watch over the candidates at their events.</p><p>Candidates also can&#39;t provide promotional materials that show their face, though some have found ways around that.</p><p><strong>The glass wall</strong></p><p><strong><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/459491653/460354835" title="NPR embedded audio player" width="100%"></iframe></strong></p><div id="res459567033"><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="May Saja (left), general manager of merchandising at Harvey Nichols, who says that the election was &quot;just the beginning,&quot; but also that &quot;it's not easy to change the mindset of a whole country.&quot; On the right: one of the private makeup rooms Princess Reema put into the store to make female customers more comfortable." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/13/maysaja-mall_custom-aa9d0f147ae905aea35033177455d4633afa99ba-s600-c85.jpg" style="height: 395px; width: 620px;" title="May Saja, left, general manager of merchandising at Harvey Nichols, who says that the election was &quot;just the beginning,&quot; but also that &quot;it's not easy to change the mindset of a whole country.&quot; On the right: one of the private makeup rooms Princess Reema put into the store to make female customers more comfortable. (Rachel Martin/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>On the trip, Martin and Peñaloza met with a member of the Saudi royal family. Princess Princess Reema Bint Bandar al-Saud, who until recently was the CEO of department store Harvey Nichols in Riyadh, walked us around a store and talked about the efforts for equality.</p></div></div></div><p>All the big names are here in Riyadh: Chanel, Dior, La Mer. And working behind the counters were women all dressed in the same long black robes, called abayas. Some wore thin veils over their faces, but most just had a loose scarf around their head.</p><p>During the visit, Princess Reema pointed out a glass-encased office where the female employees sat.</p><p>&quot;I guess the glass ceiling is in the West ... for us, it&#39;s the glass wall,&quot; she says. &quot;She can&#39;t stand up, but you can see her &mdash; and it&#39;s important for me to make sure that the men see and recognize that that woman is their equal. But out of respect for our community and our culture, she&#39;s in her private space.&quot;</p><p>Six years ago, Princess Reema decided that the way to get more women into her stores was to make them more comfortable &mdash; and that meant hiring women to sell things to them.</p><p>&quot;It was difficult when we first hired the ladies, because [the male employees] weren&#39;t sure how to react to them,&quot; she says. &quot;They weren&#39;t sure how to get in an elevator with them; they weren&#39;t sure, &#39;is it okay to say good morning, or do we ignore her?&#39; But once she&#39;s your colleague, you&#39;ve got to kind of talk to this girl. And we just kept moving the girls up to more senior positions.&quot;</p><p>NPR&#39;s Rachel Martin had some parting thoughts as she and the team departed Saudi Arabia. You can watch her clip below.</p><div id="res459561209"><div id="fb-root"><strong>&#39;A Good Moment&#39;</strong></div></div><div id="res460397769"><div><div><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="290" scrolling="no" src="http://www.npr.org/player/embed/459491653/460413760" title="NPR embedded audio player" width="100%"></iframe></p><img alt="Hatoon al-Fassi, speaking at a women's forum in Riyadh a week before the election." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2015/12/19/fullsizerender1_custom-22a20adb135ef1a2dc7da216c1bd6a554ecbb931-s200-c85.jpg" style="height: 391px; width: 310px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Hatoon al-Fassi, speaking at a women's forum in Riyadh a week before the election. (Deborah Amos/NPR)" /><p>After returning to the U.S., Martin spoke with Hatoon al-Fassi, a professor of women&#39;s studies at King Saud University in Riyadh. Fassi happened to be in Washington, D.C., and Martin asked her to reflect on the significance of the Saudi elections.</p></div></div></div><p>Despite the continued obstacles in campaigning, and even registering to campaign, Fassi says the results of the municipal elections offer reason for optimism.</p><p>&quot;Now you have women who are in the public eye for the first time, where they have to deal with real issues of their community,&quot; Fassi says. &quot;I believe that these local positions are very important. Women could change many discriminatory rules that deals with women&#39;s financial status, women&#39;s health, women&#39;s well-being.&quot;</p><p>And even if it&#39;s a small victory, Fassi says, it&#39;s a crucial one &mdash; and one that should be savored.</p><p>&quot;This is a good moment of reflecting on the victories. And it gives me hope that change can happen in my lifetime.&quot;</p><p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.npr.org/2015/12/19/459491653/after-historic-elections-in-saudi-arabia-whats-the-future-for-women?ft=nprml&amp;f=459491653"><em> via NPR</em></a></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Sun, 20 Dec 2015 19:32:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/after-historic-elections-saudi-arabia-whats-future-women-114230 'Spill' adds human element to BP's oil crisis http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-08/spill-adds-human-element-bps-oil-crisis-114101 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/11209419_10153063313810981_8873315306212135674_n.jpg" title="(Photo: Facebook/Timeline Theatre Company. Actor Justin Farley in 'Spill')" /></div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/236679254&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">&#39;Spill&#39; revisits BP&#39;s oil debacle</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">This week, an oil rig exploded in the Caspian Sea off the coast of Azerbaijan. One person is confirmed dead, 29 are reported missing.The incident has similarities to the April, 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion off the Louisiana coast that killed 11 people. The damaged BP rig also leaked millions of gallons of oil into the gulf region, causing one of the greatest environmental catastrophes in American history. A theatrical play, Spill, traces the events of the Deepwater Horizon from the perspectives of the workers on the rig, their families and the BP executives who oversaw its operation. We&rsquo;ll talk with two artists involved with &#39;Spill&#39; - actor, Kelli Simpkins, and playwright, Leigh Fondakowski. &#39;Spill&#39;, a TimeLine Theatre production, runs at Stage 773 through December 19, 2015.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-575df5bf-835f-c13c-c230-4bb11e217ac2"><a href="http://twitter.com/lfondakowski">Leigh Fondakowski</a> is a </span>playwright, writer and director of the play &#39;Spill&#39;. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em>Kelli Simpkins is an actor, and a performer in the play &#39;Spill&#39;.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/236679857&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Saudi Arabia and radical Islam</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Saudi Arabia has been in the news a lot lately. Although it&rsquo;s still early in the investigation, some news reports suggest it&rsquo;s possible at least one of the San Bernardino killers may have begun to have become radicalized there. Germany&rsquo;s vice-chancellor just accused the Saudi&rsquo;s of financing Islamic extremism in the west. He&rsquo;s warned it must stop. However, the Saudis still adhere to a strict Wahhabist faith, some say as a way to exert control. The young cosmopolitan elite in Saudi Arabia may not like the conservative ideology, but they may not have the power base to confront the religious authorities. We discuss the current situation with Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl, a professor of law at UCLA law school. He&rsquo;s a leading Islamic law and human rights scholar.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><a href="http://twitter.com /@Kh_fadl"><span id="docs-internal-guid-95496bdc-8364-f028-aaef-04a486057fea">Abou El Fadl</span>&nbsp;</a>is an Omar and Azmeralda Alfi distinguished professor in Islamic Law at UCLA Law School., and the author of the book, &#39;The Great Theft: Wrestling Islam from the Extremists&#39;.</em></p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/236680268&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Colombia&#39;s exploitative extraction industries</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Human rights observers accuse Colombia&rsquo;s extraction industries of gross exploitation and subjugation of the surrounding impoverished communities, especially Afro-Colombians. Kari Lydersen and Adriana Cardona are Chicago-based journalists who spent time in Colombia investigating the mining industry. They&rsquo;ll tell us about what they saw, the people they talked with and they&rsquo;ll share their views on how mining impacts the lives of Colombians. We&rsquo;ll also talk with artist Mary Kelsey. Her works are inspired by many of the people, in and around, Colombia&rsquo;s extraction industries. They&rsquo;ll all participate in a symposium and art exhibition at Chicago&rsquo;s Uri-Eichen Gallery on December 11, 2015.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:</strong><em>&nbsp;</em></p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-da9a1597-8367-3f6c-9aee-d0a9f8093d63"><a href="http://twitter.com/karilydersen1">Kari Lydersen</a> is the co-director of the Social Justice News Nexus, a fellowship program at Northwestern University, and teaches journalism at Northwestern. </span></em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em>Adriana Cardona is a ​Colombian​ ​journalist​ ​based in Chicago. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em>Mary Kelsey is an artist.</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 08 Dec 2015 14:43:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-12-08/spill-adds-human-element-bps-oil-crisis-114101 Despite inner turmoil, Saudi Arabia grows in influence http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-15/despite-inner-turmoil-saudi-arabia-grows-influence-113365 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/14156102446_da491574b0_z.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Ash Carter)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/228563348&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Saudi Arabia&#39;s growing influence</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">There are rumors of a succession struggle within the Saudi royal family. The country is a primary player in regional issues like ISIS, the Yemen civil war, Iraq and Syria. We&rsquo;ll talk about the potential for inner turmoil in Saudi Arabia, the country&rsquo;s growing influence in the Middle East and other regional affairs with Robert Jordan, former U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia under President George W. Bush. Jordan is author of the new book, &#39;Desert Diplomat: Inside Saudi Arabia Following 9/11&#39;.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ce45211d-6d30-23e4-1e64-5d0c714b844b">Robert Jordan is a former U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia under President George W. Bush, and the author of &#39;</span>Desert Diplomat: Inside Saudi Arabia Following 9/11&#39;.&nbsp;</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/228565166&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The human costs of getting our food from Mexico</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Reporter Richard Marosi and photographer Don Bartletti of Los Angeles Times trailed thousands of laborers on Mexico&#39;s mega-farms. They discovered brutal, inhumane conditions within the industry that supplies Americans much of their produce. We spoke with Marosi last year on the report. Today, we&rsquo;ll get an update from Bartletti and hear about his new exhibit at Artworks Projects for Human Rights called &ldquo;Product of Mexico&rdquo;. It shows the lives and struggles of farm workers in Mexico. We&rsquo;ll also talk with Leslie Thomas of Artworks Projects. They&rsquo;ll tell us about farm workers in Mexico who are &ldquo;trapped for months at a time in rat-infested camps, often without beds and sometimes without functioning toilets or a reliable water supply&rdquo;.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guests:</strong>&nbsp;</p><ul><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><a href="http://twitter.com/dbartletti">Don Bartletti</a> is a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist. </em></li><li style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ce45211d-6d32-49f5-a452-d594c36acc26">Leslie Thomasis the founding executive &amp; creative dir. of <a href="http://twitter.com/ARTWORKSProject">ArtWorks Projects for Human Rights</a>.&nbsp;</span></em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/228566005&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Scientists pushing lawmakers on the climate</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Yesterday was a &ldquo;National Day of Action&rdquo; on Climate Change. At least 40 U.S. cities participated in protests and events geared to push lawmakers to act more aggressively on the Environment and sustainability. Ken Kimmell, president of the Union of Concerned Scientists, attended last year&rsquo;s climate march in New York. He was also present when President Obama unveiled his Clean Power Plan this past August. Kimmell will join us to discuss the progress of the &lsquo;National Day of Action&rsquo;, his thoughts on President Obama&rsquo;s energy plan and what he hopes is accomplished at the December climate talks in Paris.</p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-ce45211d-6d36-1dbc-1559-652f4e5a1135"><a href="http://twitter.com/kenkimmell">Ken Kimmell </a>is the president of the Union of Concerned Scientists, former commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, and the former board chairman of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). </span></em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 15 Oct 2015 15:18:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-15/despite-inner-turmoil-saudi-arabia-grows-influence-113365 Saudi Arabia escalates attacks in Yemen http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-28/saudi-arabia-escalates-attacks-yemen-112764 <p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Sheila Carapico says Saudi Arabia seeks hegemony over Yemen</strong></span></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d5363326-7617-f9aa-ab49-4abce8b3e762">News coming out of Yemen seems to indicate that Saudi Arabia is making bold moves to establish a foothold in the country to counter its rival, Iran. Reports suggest that the Saudis now have boots on the ground in Yemen as it continues bombing raids against Shiite Houthi rebels. But many observers, like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, feel more attention must be paid to the &ldquo;catastrophic&rdquo; humanitarian crisis resulting from the conflict. Sheila Carapico, political science professor at the University of Richmond, will tell us why she thinks most of the news coming out of Yemen is Saudi propaganda meant to take the eye off the slaughter of civilians.</span></p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-d5363326-761e-9a34-8bd2-6b4c2e091faa"><a href="http://polisci.richmond.edu/faculty/scarapic/">Sheila Carapico</a> is</span>&nbsp;professor of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Richmond</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/221328803&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Hubert Sauper&#39;s film &quot;We Come as Freinds&quot; is on Western exploitation of Sudanese</strong></span></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-a7cf3a61-7619-6732-9b31-05a4a66f2aa3">This week, President Salva Kiir of South Sudan signed a peace accord aimed at ending nearly two years of conflict. Since the start of the civil war in 2013, at least eight peace deals have collapsed before ever taking effect. &nbsp;The conflict began as power struggle between Kiir and his former deputy, Riek Machar. &nbsp;The latest film by director &nbsp;Hubert Sauper, &#39;<a href="http://www.wecomeasfriends.com/us/">We Come as Friends</a>&#39;, explores the moment when Sudan was being divided into two nations. &nbsp;Film contributor Milos Stehlik and Hubert Sauper join us to discuss the film and what is happening in South Sudan.</span></p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span>Guests:&nbsp;</span></strong></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-a7cf3a61-761d-e247-4199-2453815fb63b">Hubert Sauper is the director of the film &quot;We Come As Friends&quot;.&nbsp;</span></p><p dir="ltr">Milos Stehlik is the director of Facets Multimedia and WBEZ&rsquo;s film contributor.<iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/221330807&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p dir="ltr"><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Weekend Passport: Ania Jaworska exhibit,&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-8ac0c89c-761a-f718-862c-aaae0b0fadfa">Chicago Dancing Festival</span>, Ugandan Kid&rsquo;s Choir and &#39;Art&#39; by Gorilla Tango</strong></span></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-8ac0c89c-761b-5d85-394b-248ab47f0f16"><span id="docs-internal-guid-8ac0c89c-761c-7da3-4017-dfd5477d27a8">Each week, global citizen, Nari Safavi, helps listeners plan their international weekend. This week, we&rsquo;ll hear about an <a href="http://www2.mcachicago.org/exhibition/bmo-harris-bank-chicago-works-ania-jaworska/">exhibit</a> featuring the work of Polish artist Ania Jaworska.</span></span></p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> Nari Safavi is co-founder of Pasfarda Arts and Cultural Exchange</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/221330807&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Fri, 28 Aug 2015 10:45:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-28/saudi-arabia-escalates-attacks-yemen-112764