WBEZ | politics http://www.wbez.org/tags/politics Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Governor Bruce Rauner, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and one dead fish http://www.wbez.org/news/governor-bruce-rauner-mayor-rahm-emanuel-and-one-dead-fish-113580 <p><div><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/rauner%20at%20paulina%20meat%20market.JPG" style="height: 400px; width: 300px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" title="Governor Bruce Rauner at Paulina Meat Market. (WBEZ/Tony Arnold)" />The public battle between two of Illinois&rsquo; most powerful politicians culminated Friday with the use of a familiar political weapon: A dead fish.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner referenced local political lore Friday, as he held up a plastic-wrapped fillet of tuna for reporters and said he would send it to Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel in jest. &nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The fish stunt was Rauner&rsquo;s attempt to add some levity to the tension that&rsquo;s been heating up between he and the mayor, ever since Chicago&rsquo;s City Council approved Emanuel&rsquo;s budget for 2016 and as the State of Illinois is about to enter its fifth month without a budget. The budget includes a property tax increase for city residents and businesses. The historic levy will mostly go toward funding the city&rsquo;s ailing police and firefighters&rsquo; pensions.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In recent weeks, Emanuel and Rauner have been in private talks over some initiatives the mayor needs the Statehouse to approve. That includes an exemption to that recently-approved property tax increase, for residents whose homes are worth less than $250,000. And Emanuel is still waiting for Rauner to say he&rsquo;ll sign off on a new payment schedule for those financially struggling pension funds.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Emanuel criticized Rauner for not supporting what the mayor called &ldquo;the economic engine&rdquo; of Illinois, referring to the City of Chicago. In response, a Rauner spokesman said Emanuel needed to &ldquo;get serious&rdquo; about if he&rsquo;ll endorse the governor&rsquo;s policies, or become, a &ldquo;tax-and-spend&rdquo; politician who is already planning to raise more taxes.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>On Friday, the public back-and-forth escalated even further.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;You&rsquo;re 120 days behind budget, $6 billion and counting and not paying bills,&rdquo; Emanuel said, referring to the ongoing state budget impasse. &ldquo;Stop name-calling and just do your job.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Soon after, Rauner held his own news conference at a Chicago meat market -- and this is where the fish came in The governor said he would send the cut of tuna to Emanuel, a reference to the<a href="http://foreignpolicy.com/2008/11/06/the-five-most-infamous-rahm-emanuel-moments/" target="_blank"> infamous story</a> that, years ago, Emanuel once sent a dead fish to a political operative.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>But the humor only lasted so long. While Rauner said he&rsquo;s &ldquo;very fond&rdquo; of Emanuel, he later grew more serious when asked about Chicago&rsquo;s property tax increase.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;Chicago, I believe, has made a fundamental mistake,&rdquo; Rauner said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s the reason I&rsquo;m opposed to what the mayor has done. He&rsquo;s put a massive tax hike on the people of Chicago without significant structural reform. I think that&rsquo;s a mistake.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Rauner also said Emanuel, on principle, wants some of the policies that he&rsquo;s pushing for, like changes to workers compensation.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s some hiding, dodging,&rdquo; Rauner said of Emanuel. &ldquo;We need structural reform.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Emanuel and Rauner are old friends and often speak privately. But the public dispute is a sign that the political impasse stretching out in the Statehouse is reaching the City of Chicago.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Lauren Chooljian and Tony Arnold cover politics for WBEZ. Follow them <a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian" target="_blank">@laurenchooljian</a> and<a href="https://twitter.com/tonyjarnold" target="_blank"> @tonyjarnold.</a></em></div></p> Fri, 30 Oct 2015 17:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/governor-bruce-rauner-mayor-rahm-emanuel-and-one-dead-fish-113580 ‘Trust issues’ with Springfield have aldermen looking for property tax relief plan B http://www.wbez.org/news/%E2%80%98trust-issues%E2%80%99-springfield-have-aldermen-looking-property-tax-relief-plan-b-113491 <p><div>Citing &ldquo;trust issues&rdquo; with Springfield lawmakers, many Chicago aldermen are looking for another way to help homeowners stomach higher property taxes.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>More than 30 aldermen have signed their names on proposals that would give rebates to struggling taxpayers. Two members say that without the assurance of that plan B, they&rsquo;ll vote no on the budget.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Mayor Rahm Emanuel has long said his proposed $543 million property tax hike would come with a break for homes valued at $250,000 or less and a doubling of the homeowner&rsquo;s exemption. But the mayor&rsquo;s plan requires approval from state lawmakers and Gov. Bruce Rauner, and so far it has only passed through one committee. State lawmakers won&rsquo;t meet again until November, and aldermen are scheduled to cast their budget vote on October 28th.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP_821590849688.jpg" style="text-align: center; height: 200px; width: 300px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Illinois Speaker of the House Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, speaks to lawmakers while on the House floor during session at the Illinois State Capitol Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015, in Springfield, Ill. Democrats in the General Assembly continue attempts at flanking the Republican governor on the budget impasse, advancing legislation that would distribute money that's already been collected to local governments, lottery winners and more. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)" /></p><div>Alderman John Arena (45) said he and his colleagues have &ldquo;trust issues&rdquo; with deadlocked Springfield, and that makes it tough to believe lawmakers will come through on the exemption plan.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re gonna hope that they do their job, we hope they&rsquo;ll do the right thing, so that Chicago can deal with this very important issue, if not, let&rsquo;s do what we can within our purview,&rdquo; Arena said.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Providing property tax relief through rebates is not a new idea at City Hall: Mayor Richard M. Daley started a <a href="https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/mayor/press_room/press_releases/2009/october_2009/mayor_daley_announces.html" target="_blank">rebate program</a> as part of his 2010 budget. But Ald. Michele Smith (43) said as the budget vote gets closer, there is &ldquo;rising sentiment in the council for a rebate program.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Smith introduced an ordinance this week that would assist homeowners age 60 or older who have owned their homes for 18 years or more and are facing triennial assessments higher than 30 percent. <a href="https://chicago.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2501244&amp;GUID=A8909CD3-6249-4D5D-82CD-CFCAC6B167F5&amp;Options=Advanced&amp;Search=" target="_blank">Her plan</a> is an attempt to widen another rebate plan from <a href="http://www.ward1.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/RELIEF.pdf" target="_blank">Ald. Proco &ldquo;Joe&rdquo; Moreno (1) who proposed a relief program</a> for households earning $100,000 or less a year -- an announcement he made weeks before the mayor&rsquo;s official budget announcement.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><a href="https://chicago.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2469616&amp;GUID=E60FA614-1C64-40BC-AE85-9214DC5F6760&amp;Options=Advanced&amp;Search=" target="_blank">A third proposal from members of the Progressive Caucus</a> would distribute funds that members say are still left over from Daley&rsquo;s rebate program in 2010. &nbsp;One of the sponsors, Ald. Carlos Ramirez Rosa (35) said without a rebate program or final approval in Springfield on the homeowner&#39;s exemption, he&rsquo;d cast a no-vote next Wednesday. Arena is with him, calling a budget without either of those items a &ldquo;deal breaker.&rdquo;&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Emanuel&rsquo;s staff didn&rsquo;t say whether the mayor would be open to including one of these rebate programs in the budget. Instead, they repeated what Emanuel and his staff have constantly said about the homeowner&rsquo;s exemption: That the plan has never been contentious or controversial in Springfield before, so there is no reason it will be now.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Lauren Chooljian covers Chicago politics for WBEZ. Follow her <a href="http://twitter.com/laurenchooljian" target="_blank">@laurenchooljian</a>.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Fri, 23 Oct 2015 16:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/%E2%80%98trust-issues%E2%80%99-springfield-have-aldermen-looking-property-tax-relief-plan-b-113491 Emanuel: Springfield lawmakers “have to” break stalemate, help Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-springfield-lawmakers-%E2%80%9Chave-to%E2%80%9D-break-stalemate-help-chicago-113486 <p><div>Another agency in Chicago is looking to deadlocked Springfield for help balancing its books, but Mayor Rahm Emanuel said that&rsquo;s OK, because state lawmakers will eventually come through on their obligations.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Chicago Transit Authority officials say their 2016 budget will be balanced, but only if they get the normal level of funding from the state.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think I&rsquo;m usually seen as an optimist or keep hope alive is my operating theory,&rdquo; Emanuel told reporters at the Addison CTA Blue Line stop. &ldquo;Look, they have to and will in the end of the day resolve their problem. And their breakdown. They&rsquo;ll have to pass their budget and they&rsquo;ll have to meet their responsibilities.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Emanuel joined CTA president Dorval Carter Jr. Thursday to announce the details of the agency&rsquo;s budget proposal. Carter said the CTA would not increases fares or cut services to balance their $1.475 billion budget, but it will need state funding to fill about 20 percent of the spending plan as it has in years past.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/IMG_1583.JPG" style="height: 300px; width: 400px; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px; float: right;" title="Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and CTA President Dorval R. Carter, Jr. announce details of the agency’s 2016 budget. (WBEZ/Lauren Chooljian)" /></p><div>Carter said he&rsquo;s been in &ldquo;productive conversations&rdquo; with lawmakers in Springfield. But as Illinoisans know well, the state is in its fourth month without a budget.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>&ldquo;I can&rsquo;t speak for the governor or for anyone else in terms of where they&rsquo;re going to go or what they&rsquo;re going to do,&rdquo; Carter said. &ldquo;What I can say is I&rsquo;m managing my budget efficiently.&rdquo;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The budget calls for eliminating 100 positions in what officials call &ldquo;non-customer facing areas.&rdquo; It also projects continued growth in ridership. &nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The CTA isn&rsquo;t the only Chicago agency counting on the state. The Chicago Board of Education<a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-board-education-passes-budget-banks-imaginary-money-112740" target="_blank"> unanimously approved a multibillion dollar budget </a>that relies on almost $500 million from Springfield, even though the Illinois General Assembly hasn&rsquo;t agreed to send the Chicago Public School district any additional money.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Meanwhile at City Hall, aldermen are hemming and hawing over whether to support a $543 million property tax increase that relies on Governor Bruce Rauner signing a bill that would lessen state-mandated police and fire pension payments. And an Emanuel supported bill that would double the current homeowners&rsquo; exemption and lessen the blow on homeowners who he said can least afford the additional property tax pain has only passed through one committee.&nbsp;</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Aldermen have said that their &ldquo;trust issues&rdquo; with Springfield could affect whether or not they support the mayor&rsquo;s budget.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em>Lauren Chooljian covers Chicago politics for WBEZ. Follow her<a href="http://twitter.com/laurenchooljian" target="_blank"> @laurenchooljian</a>.</em></div><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Fri, 23 Oct 2015 13:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-springfield-lawmakers-%E2%80%9Chave-to%E2%80%9D-break-stalemate-help-chicago-113486 Mayor Rahm Emanuel reveals budget http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-22/mayor-rahm-emanuel-reveals-budget-113027 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/rahm budget.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Mayor Rahm Emanuel presents his <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/emanuel-calls-nearly-600-million-property-tax-hike-113019">official budget</a> to City Council today. He&rsquo;s proposing a huge property tax hike and garbage collection fees, but they&rsquo;re not official until we see them in the budget. WBEZ political reporter <a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor">Lauren Chooljian</a> joins us to break down what we know now, and how it might affect Chicago residents.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 22 Sep 2015 11:46:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-22/mayor-rahm-emanuel-reveals-budget-113027 Morning Shift: September 15, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/morning-shift-september-15-2015-112939 <p><p>First up, the city is selling vacant lots for a dollar through the <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/chicago%E2%80%99s-large-lots-program-sells-vacant-properties-1-112938">Large Lots</a> program. More and more shows are strictly online, and<a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/subscribers-streaming-services-sue-city-over-cloud-tax-112937"> a new tax</a> in Chicago could make watching them more expensive. Now Chicago is being sued for it. We talk about whether the arguments against it will hold up in court. Plus, the new school year is underway and no doubt there&rsquo;s still some adjusting for both students and teachers &mdash; especially brand <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/how-train-next-generation-teachers-112933">new teachers</a>. There certainly are lots of ways to train those wanting to enter the profession. We take a look at some of the pros and cons of the various training approaches. We also look at how <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/passing-political-baton-new-crop-pols-112936">longtime politicians</a> groom the next generation of leaders. Plus, a look at a local political website&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/new-wiki-digs-deep-city-state-and-congressional-politicians-112934">latest add-on</a> that should be a boon for political junkies looking for back-stories on politicians.&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 15 Sep 2015 12:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/morning-shift-september-15-2015-112939 Passing the political baton to a new crop of pols http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/passing-political-baton-new-crop-pols-112936 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/next gen pols Daniel X. O&#039;Neil.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Earlier this month, U.S. Congressman Danny Davis announced (during his birthday party) that he&rsquo;s seeking re-election to his 7th district seat. Shortly after that, former Chicago mayoral candidate Amara Enyia announced she had formed an exploratory committee for the same seat. Davis supported Enyia&rsquo;s mayoral run. Davis is not alone in being challenged by the next generation. Congressman Bobby Rush is also on that list. It got us to thinking about longtime elected officials grooming the next group of leaders to take over.</p><p>How many local and state politicians can you name that have retired or moved on to something else AND passed that political baton? Former Chicago Alderman Richard Mell and his daughter Deborah Mell come to mind. A few others are the Isaac Sims, who was the 28th Ward committeeman, and his son-in-law William Carothers; Cook County Board President John Stroger to son Todd Stroger.</p><p>Is it hard for the seasoned guard to help along a new batch of leaders to eventually take their place? Chicago Sun-times and ABC 7 Political Analyst <a href="https://twitter.com/MediaDervish">Laura Washington</a> joins us with her take on the subject.</p></p> Tue, 15 Sep 2015 12:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/passing-political-baton-new-crop-pols-112936 New wiki digs deep into city, state and Congressional politicians http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/new-wiki-digs-deep-city-state-and-congressional-politicians-112934 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/il capitol Justin Brockie.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Many people say Chicago politics is the best game in town. It continues to be fascinating because of the colorful characters that occupy that world. Some of the same names capture headlines, and when you dig deeper you learn the connections between Chicago pols run deep and wide, all the way to the state legislature and the Congressional level.</p><p>A politician&rsquo;s campaign page, or official Website, shares details they want out there, but it&rsquo;s up to Websites like <a href="https://www.aldertrack.com/">Aldertrack</a>, which cater to political junkies, to reveal more of the story and how they&rsquo;ve risen to power. Aldertrack co-founder Mike Foucher joins us to share some of the more interesting tidbits from the <a href="http://clout.wiki/Main_Page">clout wiki</a> they officially launched yesterday.</p></p> Tue, 15 Sep 2015 11:36:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-09-15/new-wiki-digs-deep-city-state-and-congressional-politicians-112934 What state fair attendees think of the battle over the state budget http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-20/what-state-fair-attendees-think-battle-over-state-budget-112693 <p><p>Two months into the state&rsquo;s budget stalemate, politicians are taking their ideas directly to the voters this week at the Illinois state fair. Yesterday Governor Rauner roared in on his black Harley Davidson to talk about a property tax freeze and changes to the way Chicago Public Schools&rsquo; pensions are funded. Today&rsquo;s known as Dem Day, so folks can expect to see a lot of Democrats in among the carnival rides and the cows.</p><p>But how open are voters to the governor&rsquo;s &mdash; or the Democrats&rsquo; &mdash; plans? WBEZ statehouse reporter Tony Arnold is down at the fair and he&rsquo;s got some reactions from residents. (Photo: Flickr/katherine johnson)</p></p> Thu, 20 Aug 2015 10:59:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-20/what-state-fair-attendees-think-battle-over-state-budget-112693 Cook County Democrats choose not to endorse in two big races http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-democrats-choose-not-endorse-two-big-races-112687 <p><p>Anybody who thinks the old way of Chicago politics is fading, hasn&rsquo;t been by the Erie Cafe this week.</p><p>All day Tuesday, and most of the day Wednesday, 80 Cook County Democratic heavyweights &mdash; including familiar names like Burke, Madigan and Berrios &mdash; came together to eat donuts, drink coffee and battle it out over which candidates deserve the party&rsquo;s endorsement&nbsp;for the upcoming March 2016 primary.</p><p>This time around, the party decided not to endorse in two big races: Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney and the U.S. Senate, currently occupied by Republican Senator Mark Kirk.</p><p>The committeemen set up shop in an actual back room at the Erie Cafe, after many years at Hotel Allegro &mdash; word is, the old spot raised its rates. The leaders of the party sit at a table covered with a white tablecloth, with procedural books on Robert&rsquo;s Rules of Order and the Chicago election code in arm&rsquo;s reach.</p><p>The room was smoke free, though someone passed around wrapped cigars at one point.</p><p>Candidates sit outside the meeting room like students waiting outside the principal&rsquo;s office. They&rsquo;re called to the podium one by one, where they stump for jobs like Metropolitan Water Reclamation District Commissioner.</p><p>The names on this years ballot range from the not-very-well known, like Wallace Davis III, to the incredibly familiar, like former Cook County Board President Todd Stroger, who is now running for a two-year term as a water district commissioner.</p><p>A few committeemen stood up to praise Stroger &mdash; Alderman Walter Burnett said Stroger had received a &ldquo;bum wrap and deserves another opportunity&rdquo; &mdash; but in the end, the party decided to endorse tech entrepreneur Tom Greenhaw instead.</p><p>It&rsquo;s no secret that a lot of committeemen already know who they&rsquo;ll back before they walk into the slating meeting, but that doesn&rsquo;t mean the candidates don&rsquo;t take the process seriously.</p><p>On Tuesday, one candidate arrived at the podium, red in the face with nerves. Another brought up a bright magenta note card with a huge smiley face on it, to correct what she called her &ldquo;Resting B-face. I have a not-friendly resting face.&rdquo;</p><p>But a lot of the real action happens after the speeches, behind a thick wooden door, where committeemen defend their picks to their colleagues. One aldermen left Tuesday&rsquo;s closed session muttering under his breath that he fought like hell.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="100" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219999051&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>This year, much of the back and forth was about the candidates for Cook County&rsquo;s State&rsquo;s Attorney and U.S. Senate. While there are four candidates for State&rsquo;s Attorney, committeemen said the room was split between incumbent Anita Alvarez and Kim Foxx, former Chief of Staff to Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle.</p><p>In the Senate race, five candidates were vying for the party&rsquo;s endorsement. U.S. Representative Tammy Duckworth tried to convince members that she was their best hope at unseating Republican Senator Mark Kirk.</p><p>&ldquo;I take a lot of his positives off the table and focus it on the issues. He&rsquo;s not going to be able to rest on his military record with me,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s not gonna be able to play the sympathy vote and say &lsquo;you know, because I recovered from my illness, I understand better what it&rsquo;s like for people to recover.&rsquo; Well, I can talk about recovery and I can say then, &lsquo;why do you want to cut back on Medicaid and Medicare?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Another familiar candidate, Andrea Zopp, former head of the Chicago Urban League, told committeemen that she had the best chance of reaching voters all across the state.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m the only candidate with the resources that will be there to bring out minority voters, to get them excited into this race we need them for all of our ticket,&rdquo; Zopp said.</p><p>But in the end, the party decided not to endorse anyone in the Senate race. A party spokesman said that&rsquo;s become more common lately, as more and more candidates figure out the best ways to lobby committeemen before the meetings begin.</p><p>But one Chicago ward committeeman said he&rsquo;s concerned over the trouble this could cause for Democratic fundraising for the upcoming primary, as he said there is a very large &ldquo;elephant in the room&rdquo; through all of these election discussions: The seemingly infinite financial resources of Republican Governor Bruce Rauner.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Full Cook County Democratic Party Slating</span></p><p><strong>For President of the United States</strong>: the party endorsed Hillary Clinton</p><p><strong>For Illinois State Comptroller</strong>: the party endorsed Chicago City Clerk Susana Mendoza</p><p><strong>U.S. Senate</strong>: No endorsement, party votes in favor of open primary</p><p><strong>Cook County State&rsquo;s Attorney</strong>: No endorsement, party votes in favor of open primary</p><p><strong>Clerk of the Circuit Court: </strong>the party endorsed incumbent Dorothy Brown</p><p><strong>Recorder of Deeds:</strong> the party endorsed incumbent Karen Yarborough</p><p><strong>Metropolitan Water Reclamation District</strong>: the party endorsed Barbara McGowan, Mariyana Spyropoulos and Josina Morita for six-year terms, and Tom Greenhaw for a two-year term.</p><p><strong>Appellate Court: </strong>the party endorsed Justice Bertina Lampkin and Judge Eileen O&rsquo;Neill Burke. Those selected as alternates were: Associate Judge William Boyd, Judge Raul Vega and Associate Judge Leonard Murray.</p><p><strong>Cook County Board of Review, 2nd District: </strong>the party endorsed Incumbent Commissioner Michael Cabonargi</p><p><strong>Circuit Court Judge</strong>: the party endorsed Judge Alison Conlon, Judge Daniel Patrick Duffy, Judge Rossana Fernandez, Judge Alexandra Gillespie, Maureen O&rsquo;Donoghue Hannon, Judge John Fitzgerald Lyke Jr., Brendan O&rsquo;Brien and Judge Devlin Joseph Schoop. Selected as alternates were: Fredrick Bates, Sean Chaudhuri, Patrick Heneghan, Nichole Patton and Peter Michael Gonzalez.</p><p><em>Lauren Chooljian covers Chicago politics for WBEZ. Follow her</em> <a href="https://twitter.com/laurenchooljian"><em>@laurenchooljian.</em></a></p></p> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/cook-county-democrats-choose-not-endorse-two-big-races-112687 Senate President pushes rival plan to help CPS http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-19/senate-president-pushes-rival-plan-help-cps-112683 <p><p>Gov. Bruce Rauner started the week by introducing a mega bill that included a property tax freeze, changes to CPS&rsquo; pension plan and limits to collective bargaining rights for unions. Senate President John Cullerton is pushing his own rival plan to help Chicago Public Schools. It includes some of the governor&#39;s policies but wouldn&#39;t limit bargaining rights for unions. His bill passed through the Senate Tuesday. President Cullerton joins us to explain what he&#39;s hoping to do with this bill, and how budget talks are progressing. (Photo: EC/File)</p></p> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:02:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-19/senate-president-pushes-rival-plan-help-cps-112683