WBEZ | South Side http://www.wbez.org/tags/south-side Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Tennis becomes more accessible on South Side http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-27/tennis-becomes-more-accessible-south-side-112744 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/tennis Dave Lowensohn.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Back in 1974, tennis was all the rage and there were about 34 million people playing the game. Today that number is 18 million and of that number...the Tennis Industry Association estimates that just three and a half million are black or Hispanic.</p><p>THE most famous tennis player right now &mdash; maybe the most famous athlete &mdash; is Serena Williams. But there aren&rsquo;t very many African Americans behind her on the pro circuit. The sport is still closed off to large chunks of minorities: traveling teams are expensive and there&rsquo;s a lack of access to courts. Sure, there are multiple tennis facilities in the north suburbs, but only a couple on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side.</p><p>Journalist <strong>Ben Austen</strong> has been following the efforts of a group of tennis enthusiasts in Chicago&rsquo;s Hyde Park and Bronzeville as they try to make tennis the sport of choices for young African Americans. It&rsquo;s the latest the latest <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/30/magazine/who-gets-to-play-tennis.html">cover story</a> for New York Times magazine.&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 27 Aug 2015 10:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-08-27/tennis-becomes-more-accessible-south-side-112744 StoryCorps Chicago: Tales from Theresa's Lounge http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-tales-theresas-lounge-112473 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/bh_storycorps_pokempner.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Marc PoKempner is a <a href="http://www.pokempner.net/book.html">photojournalist </a>who has worked extensively with the <em>Chicago Reader </em>and <em>People</em> magazine.</p><p>But in the 1960s he was just a college student in Hyde Park, interested in photography and the blues.</p><p>StoryCorps producer Francesco De Salvatore interviewed PoKempner recently.</p><p>And they spoke a lot about a basement bar in Chicago on the corner of 43rd and Indiana called Theresa&rsquo;s Lounge, where many of the city&rsquo;s most famous blues musicians held court.</p><p><em><em>Marc Pokempner was interviewed through a partnership with the Maxwell Street Foundation.</em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/storycorps-chicago-tales-theresas-lounge-112473 Drug addicts sent from Puerto Rico may be victims of ID theft in Chicago http://www.wbez.org/news/drug-addicts-sent-puerto-rico-may-be-victims-id-theft-chicago-112325 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Joel%20%281%29.JPG" style="height: 414px; width: 620px;" title="Joel says he was never able to retrieve the personal documents that Segunda Vida, a 24-hour group for addicts in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, took from him. Later, he learned that his identity was being used by someone else when his unemployment benefits were frozen.(WBEZ/Odette Yousef)" /></div><div>After we aired a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">story</a> about Puerto Rican drug addicts who were sent to unlicensed 24-hour group treatment programs in Chicago, we heard from lots of listeners. They were disturbed by one particular detail in reporter Adriana Cardona-Maguigad&rsquo;s investigation: that the groups routinely confiscate addicts&rsquo; identifying documents, and sometimes don&rsquo;t return them.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In fact, in a tension-filled scene in Cardona-Maguigad&rsquo;s story, she accompanied one man to retrieve his documents from one of these treatment programs, a place called Segunda Vida.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><iframe frameborder="no" height="100" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/213554791&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></div><blockquote><div><strong>Listen: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/drug-addicts-sent-puerto-rico-may-be-victims-id-theft-chicago-112325#playlist">More stories and conversations about the pipeline of addicts from Puerto Rico to Chicago</a></strong></div></blockquote><div><p>Our listeners wrote us to ask: What are these groups doing with the addicts&rsquo; papers? If they&rsquo;re really trying to keep those documents safe, as Cardona-Maguigad was <a href="http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/554/transcript">told</a> by a founder of Segunda Vida, then why would they keep the papers even after an addict leaves? Could they be selling these addicts&rsquo; identities on the black market?</p><p>It turns out, where Puerto Ricans are concerned, there&rsquo;s added reason for suspicion. Puerto Ricans&rsquo; identities are especially valuable, because they&rsquo;re U.S. citizens -- with Social Security numbers -- and Spanish names.</p><p>In a federal case against an alleged Puerto Rican identity <a href="http://www.ice.gov/news/releases/50-individuals-charged-puerto-rico-allegedly-trafficking-identities-puerto-rican-us">trafficking ring</a>, law enforcement agents found that a set that included a birth certificate and Social Security card could fetch up to $2,500 on the black market. With that, an undocumented immigrant from South or Central America could obtain work authorization, a line of credit or even a U.S. passport.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/puerto-rico-exports-its-drug-addicts-chicago-111852">Puerto Rico exports its drug addicts to Chicago</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>I started hanging out in the same Back-of-the-Yards neighborhood where Cardona-Maguigad found many addicts in her story. I thought, if I could just ask a few of them to share their Social Security numbers with me, we could find out what&rsquo;s happening with their personal information. Most of the men I found refused to share that data. They told me they&rsquo;d gotten their documents back when they left the treatment programs, and they didn&rsquo;t have reason to suspect foul play.</p><p>But then I met Joel.</p><p>He can&rsquo;t recall when he was sent to Chicago for treatment, but he, too, dropped out of rehab at Segunda Vida. Most mornings, I found him loafing around outside, making friendly chit-chat with other street characters. But he&rsquo;s still very much lost in the haze of his heroin addiction.</p><p>&ldquo;When you go back to this, you get totally lost,&rdquo; he told me one day, speaking in Spanish. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t even know what day it is.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">&lsquo;It appeared I was working in Alabama&rsquo;</span></p><p>I&rsquo;m not using Joel&rsquo;s last name, to protect his identity. At 34, he said the only identification he carries is a photocopy of an Illinois state ID. Like others who went to Segunda Vida for treatment, he surrendered his documents to the people running the program. Confiscating identifying papers is common practice at these kinds of unofficial treatment facilities. When he left, he said he didn&rsquo;t get his documents back. He tried, returning to the residence several times, but eventually he gave up.</p><p>Later, Joel learned that his identity was being used by someone else. He discovered it when he found that his unemployment benefits had been frozen.</p><p>&ldquo;When I went to the unemployment office I was told that they had to stop payment because it appeared I was working in Alabama and I had additional income there,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Joel shared his Social Security number with me, and with it, I got a rundown of his earnings over the years. What I found were classic signs of identity theft.</p><p>First, Joel said he hasn&rsquo;t held a steady job in years. He recalled working at a corrugated paper factory in Chicago and some brief stints canning jalapenos and olives. But his record shows continuous earnings for nearly a decade -- roughly $30,000 a year since 2006. Plus, the earnings swing erratically. One year it&rsquo;s as high as $52,000, and another, it&rsquo;s less than $16,000. And a lot the work is with temporary staffing agencies and food processing companies -- two industries known for hiring undocumented immigrants.</p><p>Because it looked suspicious, I took what I found to a man named George Rodriguez. Rodriguez described himself as a founder of Segunda Vida and a former addict himself. He denied that the program ever sold addicts&rsquo; identities, and said people always get their papers when they leave.</p><p>Clearly that was not the case with Joel. And soon I found that he&rsquo;s not the only one in this situation. In fact, the next guy I met had an even wackier story.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">&lsquo;My credit was ruined&rsquo;</span></p><p>Juan, 40, was told that the rehab program that he went to &ldquo;lost&rdquo; his papers.</p><p>&ldquo;They kept my papers, my Social Security card, my ID, my birth certificate, everything,&rdquo; he said in Spanish.</p><p>Then last year, he tried to get a car loan. That&rsquo;s when he got his first inkling that something was up with his personal information.</p><p>&ldquo;They said no because my credit was ruined,&rdquo; he said.</p>So I took Juan&rsquo;s Social Security Number, too, and showed what I found to several experts. Here&rsquo;s a snapshot:</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/image%20%281%29.png" title="Juan, a drug addict from Puerto Rico, arrived in Chicago in 2003. That same year, earnings associated with his Social Security Number rose dramatically." /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div><p>&ldquo;Wow. Well. I know they say America&rsquo;s the Land of Opportunity, but, boy, has his income jumped since arriving on the mainland,&rdquo; said William Kresse, a professor at Governors State University and an expert on identity theft, on seeing Juan&rsquo;s incomes.</p><p>The first red flag Kresse identified was the year that Juan&rsquo;s income jumped significantly.</p><p>&ldquo;Suddenly in 2003, the year that he was brought to the Chicago area, it jumps to almost $30,000, and then almost $44,000. And, oh my goodness, $116,000, almost $168,000,&rdquo; said Kresse. &ldquo;Yeah, this is remarkable.&rdquo;</p><p>There were even earnings during times that Juan was in jail for theft and residential burglary. His records paint a frenetic picture, of a guy processing beef in Washington state, removing snow in Illinois, working at a Wendy&rsquo;s fast food restaurant and holding thirteen other jobs&hellip; all in a single year.</p><p>There are some things we can&rsquo;t say for sure. We can&rsquo;t say that Juan and Joel&rsquo;s identities were sold by the drug rehab programs. We can&rsquo;t say that everyone who&rsquo;s gone to one of these programs is a victim of identity theft. We can&rsquo;t even say for sure that Juan and Joel didn&rsquo;t sell their identities themselves. I asked, and they both said they didn&rsquo;t. But federal law enforcement officials have found that some Puerto Rican addicts do that for a bit of cash.</p><blockquote><p><strong>Related: <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/sheriff-dart-investigate-unlicensed-rehab-centers-111938">Sheriff calls on feds to investigate Puerto Rican agencies that send addicts to Chicago</a></strong></p></blockquote><p>That said, Bill Kresse said there is still enough here to warrant further action.</p><p>&ldquo;Definite red flags to show that there&rsquo;s probable cause to go ahead with a further investigation, in fact a criminal investigation into this,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;The numbers alone should justify a criminal investigation.&rdquo;</p><p>Kresse wasn&rsquo;t the only one to say this. We found lots of officials who said there&rsquo;s enough here to warrant concern. A federal prosecutor. A former Chicago police officer. Two former FBI agents. Someone with the Social Security Administration. The Illinois Department of Human Services. They agree that if these treatment places are organized schemes to set up vulnerable drug addicts for identity theft, somebody should go after them.</p><p>But nobody agrees on who should look into it.</p><p>Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan&rsquo;s office said it&rsquo;s a matter for Chicago Police or the FBI. Chicago Police and the FBI said there&rsquo;s nothing to investigate if victims don&rsquo;t report a crime. Immigration and Customs Enforcement doesn&rsquo;t talk about whether it&rsquo;s investigating something. And the Social Security Administration said it lacks jurisdiction to investigate identity theft.</p><p>So we know we have something. We just don&rsquo;t have anyone willing to investigate it.</p><p><em>Odette Yousef is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/oyousef">@oyousef</a> and <a href="https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/3512712648/36dee91a3ceeb66e8253372b9e042d0c_400x400.jpeg">@WBEZoutloud</a>.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></div><p><span style="font-size:24px;">More stories and conversations about the pipeline of addicts from Puerto Rico to Chicago<a name="playlist"></a></span></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="350" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/121617509&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Mon, 06 Jul 2015 22:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/drug-addicts-sent-puerto-rico-may-be-victims-id-theft-chicago-112325 Advocates for South Side trauma center gain momentum http://www.wbez.org/news/advocates-south-side-trauma-center-gain-momentum-112194 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Screen Shot 2015-06-15 at 4.50.13 PM_0.png" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">For years, activists have protested the University of Chicago hospital for closing its adult trauma center. And for years, the university has argued a facility would cost too much money. But growing public support for the idea may be turning the tide.</p><p dir="ltr">Veronica Morris-Moore is part of the coalition pushing the school.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I am connected to this issue because I am a member of Fearless Leading by the Youth. I got started two weeks after Damian Turner, who used to be a cofounder of FLY, got shot in his back on 61st and Cottage Grove,&rdquo; Morris-Moore said.</p><blockquote><p dir="ltr"><strong>Related:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/trauma-patients-southeast-side-take-more-time-reach-trauma-centers">Patients on Southeast Side take more time to reach trauma centers</a></strong></p></blockquote><p dir="ltr">The shooting of youth activist Damian Turner happened just around the corner from U of C. The hospital didn&rsquo;t provide adult trauma care so Turner had to be driven nine miles north to Northwestern&rsquo;s hospital &mdash; he died less than 90 minutes later.</p><p dir="ltr">Morris-Moore joined a campaign to pressure the university to reopen its Level 1 adult trauma center, which take care of people injured by penetrating wounds...car crashes, stabbings, gunshots.</p><p dir="ltr">After a few initial protests Moore&rsquo;s group met with University of Chicago officials.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;And that was the meeting just to, I guess, say officially &lsquo;no,&rsquo;&rdquo; she said.</p><p dir="ltr">Chicago is served by six trauma centers sprinkled around the city and nearby suburbs &mdash; none on the city&rsquo;s South Side where some areas suffer high rates of violence.</p><p dir="ltr">The University of Chicago closed its adult trauma center in 1988 after two years. Officials say the hospital lost $2 million annually serving patients without health insurance.</p><p dir="ltr">The effort to reopen U of C&rsquo;s trauma center gained additional attention last fall when the school bid for the Obama Presidential Library. Then this March there was a big protest near the Ritz-Carlton hotel where the university held a $4.5 billion fundraiser.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;That money could fund a trauma center for years and years. I wouldn&rsquo;t say we&rsquo;re in a very desperate moment right now but I think we&rsquo;re at a very important moment,&rdquo; Morris-Moore said.</p><p dir="ltr">That moment features a growing coalition of increasingly powerful voices, from pastors to politicians. U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush (D-Ill.) has proposed that the federal government grant states money for trauma services.</p><p>Despite multiple requests the University of Chicago declined to be interviewed.</p><p dir="ltr">Meanwhile, the need for adult trauma care on the South Side hasn&rsquo;t gone away.</p><p dir="ltr">Marie Crandall, a surgeon at Northwestern University hospital, put out a <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/report-links-chicagoans-distance-trauma-centers-higher-mortality-rates-106732">study</a> that confirmed <a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/trauma-patients-southeast-side-take-more-time-reach-trauma-centers">an earlier WBEZ analysis</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;What we found was that for similarly injured individuals, if you were shot more than five miles from a trauma center in Chicago that your likelihood of dying was 21 percent greater,&rdquo; Crandall said.</p><p dir="ltr">Earlier this year the Illinois Department of Public Health put out <a href="http://dph.illinois.gov/sites/default/files/publications/Trauma_Center_Feasibility_Study.pdf">a trauma center feasibility study</a>.</p><p dir="ltr">The University of Chicago scores the highest but three other South Side hospitals could be Level 2 adult trauma centers: Jackson Park, Roseland and Advocate Trinity. The difference between a Level 1 and Level 2 is the medical teaching aspect.</p><p dir="ltr">But for cash-strapped hospitals real feasibility still comes down to money.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know what a perfect solution is and I don&rsquo;t know that adding a trauma center will make as much a difference as most people hope it does,&rdquo; Crandall said. &ldquo;It has to be studied because if we put a tremendous amount of resources in something that ultimately demonstrated no difference in outcomes or even worse a poorly functioning hospital, we would need to reevaluate.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Running a trauma center can exceed $20 million annually. That&rsquo;s why the conversation always turns back to the well-funded University of Chicago.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The conversation moves slowly but I feel it&rsquo;s in a better place than 5 years ago,&rdquo; Crandall added.</p><p>In fact, officials are working with the state to raise the age of its pediatric trauma center to include 16 and 17 year olds. And in another twist, the university confirms that it is currently working on a study to analyze whether it can open an adult trauma center.</p><p>That&rsquo;s quite a change from the &ldquo;no&rdquo; officials once said.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>&nbsp;Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 16 Jun 2015 00:04:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/advocates-south-side-trauma-center-gain-momentum-112194 South Siders lobby for promises in writing as Obama library takes shape http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/south-siders-lobby-promises-writing-obama-library-takes-shape-112090 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/nm community benefits.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>The Obama Foundation has yet to choose which South Side park will host the president&rsquo;s library.</p><p>But whether it&rsquo;s Washington Park or Jackson Park, nearby residents are already dreaming big about the potential ripple effects. They want jobs and housing &mdash; and they want it in writing.</p><p>&ldquo;Think about it,&rdquo; chuckled Sandra Bivins of the 51st Street Business Association. &ldquo;You learn over the years that you need contractual agreements with folks or else they&rsquo;re not going to keep their word.&rdquo;</p><p>Bivins speaks from experience.</p><p>Chicago was one of a handful of cities that received $100 million in neighborhood empowerment zone funding under the Clinton Administration.&nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;What we didn&rsquo;t do at that time or what we didn&rsquo;t understand at that time is that once you lay out the groundwork and they say &lsquo;okay cool, this is cool,&rsquo; how do you get them to follow the agreement that they made with you?&rdquo;</p><p>Years after the city doled out those federal funds, researchers found the money didn&rsquo;t help some of the most impoverished neighborhoods. Politically connected groups reaped most of the rewards. Residents learned they can&rsquo;t always trust city hall to make sure the community gets its fair share.</p><p>Bivins is part of a South Side coalition pushing for a formal community benefits agreement, or CBA.</p><p>University of Illinois at Chicago professor Rachel Weber studies CBAs, which started in California.</p><p>&ldquo;These were attempts to have community organizations often in a coalition negotiate a separate and legally binding agreement with the developer over some large-scale redevelopment project,&rdquo; Weber said.</p><p>In exchange for certain provisions, community groups agree to get behind the project.</p><p>The first successful CBAs were negotiated in Los Angeles. In 1998 there was the Hollywood and Highland Center, home to the Oscars. Then a CBA attached to the Staples Center, home of the Lakers, ensured jobs for affected residents and affordable housing.</p><p>Despite talk of one during the failed 2016 Olympics bid, Chicago has never had a successful CBA.</p><p>But more than 10 miles south of downtown, another group is trying to change that.</p><p>A newly paved path on 87th and Lake Shore Drive used to be steel mills. When the industry shut down decades ago, this part of the city experienced major decline.</p><p>Now, the brownfield is slowly turning green with a postcard-worthy view in a new park that&rsquo;s a tribute to the former steel workers. Grassy knolls overlooking Lake Michigan are perfect for a summer picnic.</p><p>&ldquo;This is prime real estate,&rdquo; said resident Arnold Bradford. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re right on the lakefront. This is probably one of the best development sites right now in the city of Chicago. You can look downtown, you can see the skyline you can look to Indiana.&rdquo;</p><p>The colossal development he&rsquo;s referring to is called <a href="http://chicagolakesidedevelopment.com/the-site" target="_blank">Lakeside</a>, stretching between the 7th and 10th wards. The mix of retail, residential and commercial space will be bigger than the Loop and take decades to build.</p><p>Longtime residents like Yvette Moyo want a say in the process.</p><p>&ldquo;My father worked here, my brother worked here. I&rsquo;m sort of representing the families of union workers or U.S. steelworkers who feel that we have our DNA right here in this soil,&rdquo; Moyo said.</p><p>Bradford and Moyo are members of the <a href="https://asechicago.files.wordpress.com/2014/03/draft-cba-language.pdf">Coalition for a Lakeside Community Benefits Agreement</a>.</p><p>Amalia NietoGomez is the group&rsquo;s coordinator and said the coalition doesn&rsquo;t oppose the development as long as they&rsquo;re included.</p><p>&ldquo;All the skyscrapers that are downtown were built by steel mills that were on the Southeast Side and right now this area has 17 percent unemployment; it has 30 percent poverty levels. We want to return the Southeast Side back to its glory days when local people were employed, and families built generations in the houses that were here,&rdquo; NietoGomez said.</p><p>It&rsquo;s unclear whether residents will be able to negotiate CBAs over Lakeside and the Obama library. Representatives for both projects declined to comment.</p><p>UIC&rsquo;s Weber said one reason Chicago hasn&rsquo;t had a successful CBA is because the city thinks tax increment financing, or TIF, plans do the job.</p><p>&ldquo;In these 100-page documents that are signed whenever there&rsquo;s some sort of allocation of TIF funding, you&rsquo;ll see a whole section in a redevelopment agreement that lists these community benefits,&rdquo; Weber said.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not going far enough for these South Siders.</p><p>They want to be the ones driving negotiations for community benefits.&nbsp;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>&nbsp;Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Tue, 26 May 2015 18:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/south-siders-lobby-promises-writing-obama-library-takes-shape-112090 Thousands try for role in 'Chiraq' http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/thousands-try-role-chiraq-112009 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Screen Shot 2015-05-10 at 10.30.55 AM.png" alt="" /><p><p>Auditions for a Spike Lee movie about violence on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side inspired thousands of people to stand in line in the Auburn Gresham neighborhood on a chilly, gray Saturday.<br /><br />Spike Lee&rsquo;s film, called &lsquo;Chiraq,&rsquo; has garnered criticism from politicians and others who think the term reflects poorly on the city.<br /><br />But as aspiring cast members stood for hours in line outside St. Sabina Academy, most said they didn&rsquo;t see a problem with the name of the film.<br /><br />The problem, they say, is that the South and West sides of Chicago really are like war zones.<br /><br />Many expressed hope that the movie and its title would bring much-needed attention to the less affluent parts of the city.<br /><br />More than 2,500 people had gone through the audition process by about 2 p.m., standing for pictures and leaving their contact information.<br /><br />&ldquo;I knew there&rsquo;d be a lot,&rdquo; said Rev. Michael Pfleger, the pastor at St. Sabina. &ldquo;But I didn&rsquo;t know there&rsquo;d be this many.&rdquo;<br /><br />Pfleger said by the end of the day, he expected to see more than 4,000 people.<br /><br />The casting call had asked for people of all ethnicities from age 7 to 75.<br /><br />&ldquo;Grandmas and gang members, all the same, in line,&rdquo; Pfleger said.<br /><br />&ldquo;It&rsquo;s been great. It&rsquo;s been a very powerful, very positive thing here at 78th and Racine. I mean, when&rsquo;s the last time we ever heard a casting call for a movie being held in the<br />heart of the black community?&rdquo;<br /><br />Pfleger says he personally doesn&rsquo;t see a problem with Spike Lee calling the movie &lsquo;Chiraq.&rsquo;<br /><br />&ldquo;I think Spike is a good brother, I think he&rsquo;s a conscientious brother, and I think people that are here say they want to be connected with Spike Lee.&rdquo;<br /><br />Filming is expected to begin later this month.</p></p> Sun, 10 May 2015 10:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/thousands-try-role-chiraq-112009 As Whole Foods breaks ground, Englewood residents make their pitch http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/whole-foods-breaks-ground-englewood-residents-make-their-pitch-111995 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/wf.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been more than a year-and-a-half since Whole Foods announced it was setting up shop in Chicago&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood, and the store&rsquo;s opening is still more than a year away.</p><p>But that doesn&rsquo;t mean the community is sitting idly by. Residents are actively engaging with Whole Foods about the role of an organic grocery store chain in a food desert at the corner of 63rd and Halsted.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s been wonderful. I think that Whole Foods has been very committed to everything going on here,&rdquo; said Glen Fulton, executive director of the Greater Englewood Community Development Corporation, whose office is across the street in a U.S. Bank branch overlooking the construction site.</p><p>When the high-end grocer first announced it was moving to this high-poverty community some Chicagoans were shocked. But the company is trying to shed its elite label &mdash; it says part of its mission is bringing healthy options to areas riddled with junk food.</p><p>Store officials say prices will be competitive and affordable here. They also say Whole Foods is committed to being more than just an anchor tenant on a vacant lot.</p><p>The company first tested this food desert experiment a couple years ago in Detroit. It was the first national grocer to come into the city and so far it&rsquo;s been mostly a success.</p><p>In Englewood, Whole Foods has held community meetings and listened to residents who want classes on nutrition and shopping on a budget.</p><p>Fulton said he went straight to Whole Foods&rsquo; CEO with one request.</p><p>&ldquo;The first thing I wanted was for small businesses to be a part of this whole initiative for this Englewood community. Meaning that I need your support in trying to help them do business with Whole Food,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Fulton is a former director of supplier diversity at Albertsons, another major grocery chain.</p><p>&ldquo;And the second part is that we include diversity as far as diverse suppliers are concerned. So if you&rsquo;re a person of color or a woman, let&rsquo;s break down the barriers&nbsp;of trying to do business with Whole Foods,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Rachel Bernier-Green, a black South Sider, attended a free small business workshop series and learned about proper licensing and packaging. She owns &lsquo;Laine&rsquo;s Bake Shop and met a Whole Foods district manager.</p><p>&ldquo;He came out to our table and took the rest of the cookies of his favorite flavor, everything I had on display that day. So I think they enjoyed the texture of the cookies,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>So much so that Whole Foods worked with Bernier-Green to find a distributor.</p><p>Soon her mocha raspberry, citrus spritz and butter pecan bites will be in three Chicago Whole Foods. Next year the desserts will be in the store at 63rd and Halsted.</p><p>&ldquo;I think they were also impressed with the story of our company, why we exist and what we plan to do,&rdquo; Bernier-Green added.</p><p>Her small family-owned business has a social mission: hiring those who have struggled with homelessness as well as the formerly incarcerated. Each year hundreds of parolees with criminal records return to Englewood and can&rsquo;t find work.</p><p>&ldquo;We wanted to know, Whole Foods, are you going to hire people with records? We had been previously told that hands-down no, they aren&rsquo;t going to hire anybody with records,&rdquo; said Sonya Harper, executive director of Grow Greater Englewood, a food justice group. &ldquo;Whole Foods really heard our concerns as a community and they are now coming up with a program to hire people with records at that store.&rdquo;</p><p>Whole Foods says it wants to partner with social service agencies to increase opportunities for those facing employment barriers.</p><p>Meanwhile, &lsquo;Laine&rsquo;s Bake Shop is the only new confirmed supplier for the Englewood Whole Foods.</p><p>Store officials say more shelf space is available and they hope to develop some brand new businesses in the process.</p><p>There&rsquo;s still time. The next small business workshop series will be this fall.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a></em></p><p><em>Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Thu, 07 May 2015 04:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/whole-foods-breaks-ground-englewood-residents-make-their-pitch-111995 Drumming for dollars as a Chicago bucket boy http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/drumming-dollars-chicago-bucket-boy-111845 <p><p><a name="top"></a><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199910706%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-oyHw5&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em>(Editor&#39;s note: The promo photograph for this story was selected from a <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/lindsayfotos/sets/72157621838161974" target="_blank">set profile pictures produced by lindsaybayley</a>.)&nbsp;</em></p><p>If you work or visit Chicago&#39;s Loop or use the exits along the South Side&rsquo;s Dan Ryan Expressway, there&#39;s a good chance you&#39;ve experienced a fixture of the city known as the bucket boys. And if you haven&#39;t seen them directly, maybe you&rsquo;ve heard them from afar, mostly young men drumming on buckets and asking for a donation in return.</p><p>That was how Annie Dieleman became curious about the bucket boys. It started with her morning commute from Bridgeport to Englewood, where she was working. As a social worker at Thresholds, a large social service agency in Chicago, Annie, 28, was always seeing and hearing bucket boys on her drive. Plus, social work is a stressful job, and seeing the smile on the faces of the guys performing next to her window helped make her day that much better.</p><p>&ldquo;It was always nice to be around happy, pleasant people who are super positive and charming,&rdquo; Annie says.</p><p>So she asked Curious City to find out more:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>My Curious City question was about the bucket boys and I was curious how they get into the job of being a bucket boy. How they train, if they have territories. Just ... what the deal is.</em></p><p>Turns out, bucket boys treat their gig like any other job: They put in the hours, save up the cash and take care of their customers. What&rsquo;s more, for many of the young men out there, beating buckets is not just a way to make a living; it&rsquo;s a way to avoid gangs and make their mark in a positive way.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Our guides</span></p><p>For this question, we enlisted the help of Jerome and Jarrell Lucas, 29-year-old twin brothers who grew up in the Roseland neighborhood. A couple of years ago they started filming the bucket boys. Their interest grew and soon they embarked on a documentary film project titled &ldquo;Bucket.&rdquo;</p><p>These guys have been steeped in the world of Chicago bucket boys, and they know it better than most outsiders. And for that reason, it was sort of a no-brainer to provide you with the twins&rsquo; birds-eye view, as well as an audio story where you can hear directly from one of Chicago&rsquo;s bucket boys.</p><p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/drumming-dollars-chicago-bucket-boy-111845#top"><span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: sans-serif; line-height: 24px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">►</span></span><em>Take a listen to the audio story</em></a></p><div class="image-insert-image "><span style="font-size: 22px;">How did the bucket boys start?</span></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><strong>Jerome Lucas:</strong> It started in the mid-90s in the <a href="http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/2478.html">Robert Taylor buildings</a>. And they innovated a way to find a way to make money. They grabbed a 5-gallon bucket and drumsticks and took it to the streets and seen if it worked. I am assuming that they saw the other street performers and they were like, &ldquo;Well, we could do something, too. And they make music, we make music.&rdquo;</div><div class="image-insert-image "><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/FOR WEB lucas bros screenshot1.png" title="" /></div></div><div class="image-insert-image "><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcEcQR5iBNc" target="_blank"><em><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size:10px;">Above: Jarrell Lucas, left, and Jerome Lucas, right, are twin brothers who are shooting a documentary about the bucket boys. To see some snippets of their work, click here.&nbsp;</span></span></em></a></div><div class="image-insert-image ">&nbsp;</div><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Why the Dan Ryan Expressway?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> I think they choose the expressway because it&rsquo;s more convenient &mdash; you know, traffic moving fast. They look at it as a quicker way to monetize playing the bucket. They can get you in and get you out. It&rsquo;s kind of like a fast food restaurant. I think that is why they choose the expressway over the average corner. I think they would like to choose the CTA, but the reason why they don&rsquo;t choose the CTA is because [of] that sound; it echoes. And that would bring, like, the police, and bring so much attention that way. ... They have to choose their spots wisely of where they&rsquo;re going to be at.</p><p><strong>Jarrell Lucas: </strong>They get to perform for about, 5, 6, 7 seconds. And then if you want to donate you can donate, and if you don&rsquo;t want to donate, you don&rsquo;t have to.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">What do they sound like?</span></p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OokLXv4FApI?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" width="620"></iframe></p><p><em><span style="font-size:10px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Above: A Bucket Boy performance on Michigan Ave., across from Millennium Park in Chicago. (YouTube/JUSTCURI0US)</span></span></em></p><p><strong>Jarrell:</strong> A lot of drumming &mdash; different rhythms, different sounds. Different types of sounds, textures and beats. If you hear them you&rsquo;ll be downtown and you&rsquo;ll hear them from another whole block. So if you&rsquo;re on State [Street], you&rsquo;ll hear it on Randolph or another block, because it&rsquo;s so loud. A lot of people actually <a href="http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/clout_st/2009/06/city-council-swipes-at-bucket-boys-on-mag-mile.html" target="_blank">hate the sound</a>.</p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> How you can tell the more advanced bucket boys from the average bucket boys is because they got a song with it. They say something with it like, &ldquo;Hey pretty lady.&rdquo; And they are the only ones that have it. Certain groups have certain songs and certain chants they use. And some are beginners, so they just trying to catch the rhythm. They are all trying to get a rhythm together so they can make money.</p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fz8iwv5Sh6k?rel=0&amp;controls=0&amp;showinfo=0" width="620"></iframe></p><p><em><span style="font-size:10px;"><span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Above: Bucket boy Charles Chapman drums off the Dan Ryan on 55th Street. (WBEZ/Meribah Knight)</span></span></em></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">How does one become a bucket boy?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> It&rsquo;s like an initiation thing. Somebody usually brings you in, but if nobody brings you in you got to start from the bottom. You got to go to Home Depot, buy your bucket, buy your drumsticks and get out on the corner. Usually they everybody who is, like, real amateurs &mdash; they send them to 55th [Street]. And they be the only ones out there. By themselves, beating and drumming and that build confidence. You get good. If you stank, you go home and you continue to work on it. And after a minute you done built so much confidence and made so much money on your own they like, &ldquo;Who is that over there on 55th, making all that noise?&rdquo; &nbsp;It&rsquo;s kind of like the music business. It&rsquo;s like, &ldquo;Who is that guy we&rsquo;ve been hearing about? We need him with us.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">How old are most bucket boys?</span></p><p><strong>Jarrell:</strong> Between the ages of 16 and 24. That would be the ages of a bucket boy. I don&rsquo;t know about 25. I haven&rsquo;t met that person yet. But around the ages 16 to 24, they all beat buckets around that age.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">How much money can a bucket boy make?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> [If you&rsquo;re experienced] $300 to $400 a day. But if you&rsquo;re a rookie you&rsquo;re going to make probably $30, $60, $40, and that&rsquo;s it for your day.</p><p><strong>Jarrell:</strong> My personal opinion: They actually use the money for what they want. They use their art to get to where they want to go in life.</p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> I had no idea they was getting cars. &hellip; And I heard $300, but I was like, &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think kids be that responsible with the money. They take it and go blow it.&rdquo; But it was like, naw, they actually like, &ldquo;We going to get a car. We thinking about getting an apartment.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Are there territories?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> They usually on 87th, 79th, 63rd and downtown &mdash; but not downtown for long. They get in and out of downtown. Because that&rsquo;s where the most money can be made really, downtown Chicago. But they have to move in and out because <a href="http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/bacp/general/Street_Peddler-Performer_Fact_Sheet_4_10_14.pdf">they have to have permits </a>or they could be moved. For some reason they never want to get a permit.</p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> It&rsquo;s like a first come, first serve basis. Whoever gets to that corner first. I think it&rsquo;s a respectful thing to not just be, like, all on one corner. They all know each other but they each got a set they work with.</p><p><iframe frameborder="0" height="400px" src="https://a.tiles.mapbox.com/v4/curiouscity.lm075e9o.html?access_token=pk.eyJ1IjoiY3VyaW91c2NpdHkiLCJhIjoibGM3MUJZdyJ9.8oAw072QHl4POJ3fRQAItQ" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em><span style="font-size:10px;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-4180fbf2-9b3e-2c33-93be-976dfa077b8b"><span style="font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: rgb(248, 248, 248);">Above: Chicago&rsquo;s bucket boys drum at various locations around the city, depending on the season and time of day. Here&rsquo;s a map of common spots, provided by </span><span style="font-family: Arial; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Jerome and Jarrell Lucas as well as other sources.</span></span></span></em></p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">What is the trick to success?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> They have to be humble and they have to be confident to do that. ... If you&rsquo;re too confident,you come off as arrogant. And if you&rsquo;re too, how can I say ... If you have the charm turned on, people think, &ldquo;You just trying to hustle me. You&rsquo;re a panhandler.&rdquo; So I think you need a little bit of all to get a perfect bucket boy.</p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> They travel to stadiums. Because they know Chicago can be like, they done got used to seeing them. But other states are amazed by [the bucket boys]. They like, &ldquo;Out of a bucket?&rdquo; So I guess they capitalize off it. They go to other states and make lots of money at stadiums and arenas. ... They do to music concerts. ... They set up outside in the parking lot exits and entries to the stadiums.</p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> When they really want some money from somebody, they&rsquo;ll go to your window, they&rsquo;ll put it between their legs and they&rsquo;ll beat it. And when they do that it&rsquo;s like ... I guess it makes a person feel like they are performing just for them.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">Is beating a bucket a good option for some of the bucket boys?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> It&rsquo;s hard to find a job on the South Side of Chicago. And at the end of the day I think people want to be creative and be paid to be creative at what the do. So, I think this is more like their first option ... to avoid being involved in gang violence and other things of that nature. It&rsquo;s like, if you&rsquo;re not beating a bucket then you&rsquo;re involved in some type of gang violence, or you&rsquo;re becoming a victim of gang violence. So like I said, they choose wisely. I think they are good decision-makers, very good decision makers.</p><p><span style="font-size:22px;">You&rsquo;ve spent two years making this film, what is something you learned that surprised you?</span></p><p><strong>Jerome:</strong> How they get different sounds from the bucket? I didn&rsquo;t know that hitting the side of the bucket make a different sound than the top. And different, like ... How can I say? Different corners on the bucket give out different sounds. So when they are trying to come up with their little symphony together, some will hit the sides. Some will hit the top. Some hit the bottom. Some hit the top. You never knew a bucket could make so many sounds. But if you listen to bucket boys you&rsquo;ll find out they can make a bucket make so many sounds that you wouldn&rsquo;t even thought was possible.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/FOR WEB annie and meribah for qasker photo.jpg" style="height: 213px; width: 320px; float: right;" title="Reporter Meribah Knight, left, and question-asker Annie Dieleman. (WBEZ/Jesse Dukes)" /><span style="font-size:22px;">Our question asker</span></p><p>Annie Dieleman is a social worker in Chicago residing in Bridgeport. Originally from Grand Rapids, Michigan, she moved to Chicago a decade ago for college.</p><p>She says she first started wondering about who the bucket boys were when she was commuting to her social work job in Englewood. She would see them on the Dan Ryan exit ramps.</p><p>She particularly admired one young man who was always drumming as she exited the Dan Ryan at 63rd street. Finally, instead of giving him her usual wave, she rolled down her window and asked:</p><p>&lsquo;You&rsquo;re really talented.How did you get into this?&rdquo;</p><p>His answer struck a chord with Annie: It was a positive way to make money and stay out of trouble. He was building something for himself in a neighborhood that offered few job options.</p><p>&ldquo;He seemed like he had a really positive message,&rdquo; Annie says. &ldquo;It made me curious about everyone.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Meribah Knight is a freelance journalist in Chicago and reports for WBEZ&rsquo;s Curious City. Follow her at meribahknight.com and on Twitter at <a href="https://www.twitter.com/meribah" target="_blank">@meribah</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 Apr 2015 17:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/drumming-dollars-chicago-bucket-boy-111845 Campus police: real deal or rent-a-cops? http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/campus-police-real-deal-or-rent-cops-111071 <p><p>Say you are driving around Chicago and you happen to run a red light. There are no Chicago police officers around, but there is a university police car right behind you. Could you still get a ticket?</p><p>That&rsquo;s exactly what Jef Johnson was wondering when he started noticing University of Chicago Police Department cars all over his Bronzeville neighborhood.</p><p>Here&rsquo;s the question Jef sent our way:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>Are police forces at local universities real police or simply security companies? How much policing power do they have?</em></p><p>We found a straightforward legal answer about how this works in Illinois. There is a spectrum of authority that ranges from security guard to all-out cop. At the far end of that spectrum are Jef&rsquo;s own University of Chicago police. He didn&rsquo;t know it at the time but UCPD is almost unique, with a particularly strong hand when it comes to power and jurisdiction. Those officers don&rsquo;t just protect students, staff and campus &mdash; the UCPD serves as the primary police force for 65,000 Chicagoans, and most are not affiliated with the university.</p><p>That prompted a question that should interest anyone, even those who never encounter these officers: How can a private police force get jurisdiction over so much of the public?</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Not your father&rsquo;s rent-a-cops</span></p><p>Let&rsquo;s start with that legal distinction we found. If you&rsquo;re anything like Jef, you probably assume that campus police officers aren&rsquo;t real police, and they have little authority other than the power to break up rowdy parties.</p><p>&ldquo;I always thought somehow that they were rent-a-cops,&rdquo; Jef said.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not always the case, according Cora Beem, who manages mandated training for the<a href="http://www.ptb.state.il.us/aboutus.htm" target="_blank"> Illinois Law Enforcement Standards &amp; Training Board</a>. She said the big distinction to be made is between campus security guards and campus police. The latter undergo the same basic training and certification that state and municipal police officers do. With that certification, they have the same authority as any other police officer in the state, even if they are privately employed.</p><p>Illinois&rsquo; public universities employ campus police, but private universities can choose to hire plain old security guards. Those guards might be armed, but they don&rsquo;t have the power to give Jef Johnson a ticket, and they certainly cannot patrol off campus.</p><p>Like many private schools in Illinois, the University of Chicago voluntarily upgraded its security force to a police force 25 years ago. According to Beem, that means they are definitely not rent-a-cops.</p><p>&ldquo;They can write you a ticket. They can arrest you,&rdquo; Beem explained. &ldquo;They can counsel and release you, so yes, they&rsquo;re real cops.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">The UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction</span></p><p><iframe height="480" src="https://mapsengine.google.com/map/u/0/embed?mid=zD1cveoHRWh8.kfGTEakNbuXk" width="620"></iframe></p><p>With more than 100 full-time officers, the University of Chicago&rsquo;s police department is one of the largest private police forces anywhere. Not only that, UCPD also has a really big patrol area &mdash; they cover 6.5 square miles, most of which is beyond the core of the University of Chicago&#39;s South Side campus.</p><p>But why can UCPD officers patrol so far from campus in the mid-South Side? According to Craig Futterman, a clinical professor of law at University of Chicago Law School, the department&rsquo;s status is almost unique.</p><p>&ldquo;The deal is that there is a city ordinance in Chicago that grants the police superintendent the power to appoint special policemen for the city of Chicago,&rdquo; he explained.</p><p>This <a href="http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Illinois/chicago_il/title4businessesoccupationsandconsumerpr/chapter4-340specialpolicemenandsecurityg?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:chicago_il$anc=JD_Ch.4-340" target="_blank">ordinance allows private police forces to assume the powers and responsibilities of municipal police</a>, not just on campus but in surrounding neighborhoods. UCPD is only one of two private forces in Chicago with this &ldquo;special police&rdquo; designation. The other force is that of Northwestern University Law School, but its <a href="http://directives.chicagopolice.org/attachments/S12-01_Att2.jpg" target="_blank">patrol area extends just a few blocks beyond its Streeterville campus </a>north of Chicago&rsquo;s Loop.</p><p>Once the ordinance was passed in 1992, UCPD negotiated its extended jurisdiction with Chicago&rsquo;s police superintendent. To the north, University of Chicago&rsquo;s main campus stops at 55th Street. UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction, however, extends all the way to 37th Street, even farther than Jef Johnson&rsquo;s home in Bronzeville.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/u%20of%20c%20charters.png" title="University of Chicago's Woodlawn Charter School, left, and Donoghue Charter School, right, are on the southern and northern ends of UCPD's extended jurisdiction. (Ellen Mayer/WBEZ) " /></div><p>Futterman says Chicago&#39;s police superintendent has granted UCPD more independence than it once had. In years&nbsp;past, university police needed administrative assistance to complete arrests.</p><p>&ldquo;The arrest, though, would be formalized and would be processed at a local chicago police department district station, usually whatever district the arrest was because UCPD operated in more than one Chicago police district,&rdquo; Futterman explained. Last year that changed. Now UCPD reports directly to the state and can process arrests independently. According to the university, this arrangement allows both departments to operate more efficiently.</p><p>Maintaining a large police force is expensive, but the university says its worth it. On this, an emailed statement from the UCPD reads: &ldquo;The extended patrol area enhances safety and security through the mid-South Side, which is home to a large number of University of Chicago faculty members, students and staff.&rdquo; The statement mentions the university&rsquo;s interest in protecting its charter schools and other properties within the extended patrol area.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">The community speaks</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/meeting%20WEB.jpg" title="University of Chicago students and South Side residents held a forum October 29, 2014, at Hyde Park's Experimental Station to discuss UCPD's presence in their neighborhoods. (WBEZ/Ellen Mayer)" /></p><p>UCPD&rsquo;s jurisdiction doesn&rsquo;t just include university students and employees; again, the department protects approximately 65,000 residents. How do they feel about UCPD&rsquo;s presence in their neighborhoods?</p><p>On Wednesday, October 29, <a href="http://www.experimentalstation.org/" target="_blank">Hyde Park&rsquo;s Experimental Station</a> held a forum for students and South Side residents to discuss exactly that. Organizers also invited former UCPD chief Rudy Nimocks. He was at the helm when UCPD expanded its jurisdiction. As he recalls it, the university received community support as it broadened its jurisdiction.</p><p>&ldquo;We had public hearings,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We were asked to come in. At each one of the sessions I said, &lsquo;We&rsquo;ll stay here as long as you want us.&rsquo; That&rsquo;s how it&rsquo;s been ever since.&rdquo;</p><p>Nimocks has a point. Almost every speaker at the community forum expressed gratitude that UCPD has made their neighborhoods safer. That being said, almost every speaker also had a story to tell about UCPD racially profiling black residents who live within the extended jurisdiction.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/triggs%20FOR%20WEB.jpg" style="float: left; height: 246px; width: 370px;" title="Jamel Triggs, who attended the recent forum on neighborhood UCPD presence, says he's been stopped by UCPD six times since returning from the Marine Corps in May. (Ellen Mayer/WBEZ)" />Jamel Triggs, a young black man who works at the Experimental Station&rsquo;s bike shop, said he had been stopped by UCPD six times since he returned from the Marine Corps in May. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re supposed to be protecting and serving us. That&rsquo;s supposed to be the goal,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s supposed to be innocent until proven guilty, not the other way around.&rdquo;</p><p>According to Triggs, the neighborhood doesn&rsquo;t feel safer if he has to worry about being stopped by UCPD. He said he is also concerned about the safety of the younger kids he mentors at the bike shop. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want these kids walking around being scared of the police and being scared of the gangbangers out in the streets,&rdquo; he said, &ldquo;because I was, and it hurts.&rdquo;</p><p>A student group called South Side Solidarity Network has launched a campaign to end perceived racial profiling by UCPD. The trouble is, all their evidence is anecdotal. To firm up accusations of wrongdoing, SSSN has asked UCPD to release records indicating the race of residents the department stops and searches. So far, the department has refused.</p><p>Another emailed statement responds to accusations of racial profiling. &ldquo;The University of Chicago Police Department does not deploy tactics that support racial profiling,&rdquo; it states. &ldquo;As a department, we often and openly discuss our policing strategies to ensure our officers are not engaging deliberately or inadvertently in bias-based policing.&rdquo;</p><p>Without releasing records and data, however, UCPD is asking the public to take them at their word.</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Private police and public accountability</span></p><p>This is where Jef Johnson&rsquo;s curiosity about &nbsp;potential traffic stops in Bronzeville morphed into a much bigger question about the transparency and accountability of a private police force. The 1992 Chicago ordinance that allows for the creation of special police includes technical language about certificates and licensing fees, but it doesn&rsquo;t address the public&rsquo;s right to information when a private force takes on the responsibilities of municipal police. UCPD is not a governmental agency, therefore it is not required to release records under Illinois&rsquo; Freedom of Information Act.</p><p>The University of Chicago does have a <a href="http://safety-security.uchicago.edu/police/contact_the_ucpd/complaint_process/" target="_blank">process for investigating complaints against UCPD</a>, but that process will soon get an overhaul. Until now, all investigations were performed in-house, by a fellow UCPD officer. In response to <a href="http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140311/hyde-park/university-of-chicago-police-no-longer-accountable-petition-claims" target="_blank">criticism about UCPD&rsquo;s perceived lack of oversight</a>, the university recently announced the hiring of a new director of professional accountability. This new position will not be filled by a uniformed officer.</p><p>So what did Jef think about all this?</p><p>&ldquo;This is much bigger than I thought when I asked the question,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I worry about a private police force. It just sounds like maybe we&rsquo;re handing too much power to them.&rdquo; Jef said he is most concerned that the average Chicagoan might never know that UCPD had such a huge jurisdiction.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s scary in that sense,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m just finding this out, and I&rsquo;ve been living in this area ten years.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="font-size:24px;">Now we have an answer. Who asked the question?</span></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jef.jpg" style="float: right; margin: 5px;" title="Jef Johnson asked our question about university police after noticing UCPD officers far from campus. (Photo courtesy of Jef Johnson)" />Judging by the number of questions Jef Johnson has submitted to our <a href="http://curiouscity.wbez.org/" target="_blank">list of question-based story pitches</a>, he is one very curious guy. (For the record, that would be seven ... and counting!) If you haven&rsquo;t run across any of his questions we haven&rsquo;t answered yet, you might remember Jef as the truck enthusiast who launched <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/question-answered-why-ban-pickups-lake-shore-drive-where-can-they-park-104631" target="_blank">our investigation about pickup truck laws in Chicago</a>.</p><p>It turns out this question about university police was also inspired by Jef&rsquo;s driving habits. He says he first began wondering about UCPD&rsquo;s authority on a day when President Barack Obama was visiting his home in the Kenwood neighborhood.</p><p>&ldquo;They blocked off a lot of my streets, so I was taking some back streets and I saw University of Chicago Police cars in areas that seem far away from the University of Chicago.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p><p>When Jef isn&rsquo;t thinking up questions for Curious City, he&rsquo;s a wedding minister employed by the city of Chicago.</p><p><em>Ellen Mayer is the Curious City intern. Follow her on Twitter at<a href="http://twitter.com/cementley" target="_blank"> @</a>ellenrebeccam.</em></p><div>&nbsp;</div></p> Wed, 05 Nov 2014 17:26:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/campus-police-real-deal-or-rent-cops-111071 In Chicago's Beverly neighborhood, integration is no accident http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/chicagos-beverly-neighborhood-integration-no-accident-109922 <p><p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="375" scrolling="no" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wDl-MDSpfrk?rel=0" width="620"></iframe></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/146164257&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><em>Editor&#39;s note:&nbsp;We&rsquo;ll be continuing this conversation at an event at the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.beverlyartcenter.org/">Beverly Arts Center</a>&nbsp;on Tuesday, June 17. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/blogs/beyond-mic/2014-05/what-makes-beverly-unique-110246">Here are details.</a>&nbsp;</em></p><p>Erin McDuffie is from Ohio. Her husband grew up in Champaign, Ill. A mixed-race household with a toddler, they wanted to buy a house in a stable integrated South Side community. Their search led them to Beverly about three years ago. Beverly still has strong ties to its white ethnic roots, but also has a sizable number of African-Americans. Erin wondered what happened to make this South Side neighborhood different than Roseland or Englewood, which long ago became predominantly black.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/erin snow FOR WEB.jpg" style="height: 137px; width: 220px; float: right;" title="Erin McDuffie, left, asked how Chicago's Beverly neighborhood maintained racial integration. (Photo courtesy Erin McDuffie)" /></p><p>Erin asked Curious City:</p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align: center;"><em>How has Beverly managed to maintain racial integration while the majority of other South Side neighborhoods experienced white flight?</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>A little background</strong></p><p>In hyper-segregated Chicago, Beverly is often regarded as a South Side oasis of integration. Unlike integrated Hyde Park or Rogers Park on the North Side, there&rsquo;s<a href="http://www.uchicago.edu/"> no</a> university<a href="http://www.luc.edu/"> to anchor</a> Beverly or play a significant role in real estate.</p><p>The neighborhood is home to arguably the<a href="http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/top-notch-beefburgers/Location?oid=1024342"> best cheap burger</a> and fries in the city. Beverly&rsquo;s beauty is visible in its hilly streets and oversized lots, with homes designed by this <a href="http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM73DF_Raymond_W_Evans_Residence_Chicago_IL">legendary architect</a> among others. Mansions snake along Longwood Drive and the neighborhood&rsquo;s interior boasts an array of architectural styles, from Tudor to Italianate to Queen Anne to Spanish Colonial. Buoyed by its commitment to supporting local businesses, there&rsquo;s<a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2009-01-09/classified/chi-beverly-profile_chomes_0109jan09_1_houses-landmark-districts-neighborhoods"> a quaintness</a> to Beverly.</p><p>According to the Woodstock Institute, today the neighborhood is 62 percent white and 34 percent black. But it wasn&rsquo;t always that way.</p><p>For the first half of the 20th century, Chicago&rsquo;s black families were confined to a chain of neighborhoods on the South Side known as the Black Belt &ndash; often in<a href="http://museum.icp.org/museum/exhibitions/bronzeville/bronzeville1.htm"> cramped kitchenettes</a>. But after the landmark U.S. Supreme Court Case<a href="http://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/334/1/case.html"> Shelley v. Kraemer</a> struck down <a href="http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/1067.html">racially restrictive real estate covenants</a> in 1948, Chicago&rsquo;s neighborhood racial composition changed dramatically.</p><p>With new housing options, blacks moved farther south to neighborhoods with attractive single-family homes such as Chatham, Englewood, Avalon Park and Calumet Heights. White families couldn&rsquo;t pack their bags fast enough, at times even moving during the middle of the night. From 1950 to 1960, Englewood&rsquo;s white population dropped from 89 percent to 31 percent. The story of<a href="http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2013/11/mapping-60-years-white-flight-brain-drain-and-american-migration/7449/"> White Flight</a> played out similarly in other neighborhoods. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/chicagos-beverly-neighborhood-integration-no-accident-109922#censusdata2">(see Census chart.)</a></p><p>Beverly, however, was an exception.<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/for%20web%20houses.jpg" style="float: right; height: 214px; width: 320px;" title="Single-family houses on a residential Beverly street, 1974. (Photo courtesy UIC Digital Collections)" /></p><p>Black families didn&rsquo;t immediately move to Beverly, which was almost as far south as one could get before leaving the city and included more expensive housing stock. Some of the white Beverly families had already fled places like South Shore and Roseland once blacks starting buying homes there in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1970, Beverly was 99 percent white. Some community leaders and real estate agents warned the neighborhood would devolve into a &ldquo;black ghetto&rdquo; if blacks started moving in. But a band of determined neighborhood planners helped Beverly push past the early opposition.</p><p>My search for an answer to Erin&rsquo;s Curious City question led me to <a href="http://chicagohistory.org/research">Chicago History Museum&rsquo;s Research Center</a> and the<a href="http://www.ridgehistoricalsociety.org/commun_hist02.html"> Ridge Historical Society</a> in Beverly. Combing through documents and original source material, I discovered that the<a href="http://www.bapa.org/content.asp?contentid=25"> Beverly Area Planning Association</a> (BAPA) stepped in to quell white fears, welcome its new black neighbors, battle the real estate industry and craft a new mission statement that celebrated diversity. The nonprofit community organization changed its direction in 1971 from a group concerned with zoning and parking to one working toward stabilized integration. BAPA&rsquo;s service area includes the sister community Morgan Park.</p><p><strong>&ldquo;Integration is inevitable&rdquo;</strong></p><p>That line comes from a flip chart called<a href="http://www.bapa.org/article.asp?articleid=1544"> &ldquo;Beverly Now&rdquo;</a> by future BAPA member L. Patrick Stanton. In 1971, Stanton toured the neighborhood to give presentations about integration. I found the original sheets penned in magic marker when Erin and I visited the Ridge Historical Society. (Stanton still lives in Beverly, as do six of his nine children and three grandchildren.)</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/bapa%20pat%20stanton.jpg" style="float: left; width: 190px; height: 400px;" title="Patrick Stanton gave presentations about positive racial integration in Beverly throughout the 1970s. " />During this 1970s period, Beverly was a mostly Irish-Catholic neighborhood. BAPA hired Phillip Dolan, a former city administrator from Columbus, Ohio, as its new executive director. He set up a hotline for rumor control to relay accurate information in the wake of buzz about blacks buying in the neighborhood. BAPA staff members visited certain blocks to encourage people to stay in Beverly.</p><p>Residents also chafed against<a href="http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/147.html"> &ldquo;blockbusting,&rdquo;</a> efforts by real estate agents to trigger the turnover of white-owned homes to blacks. Also known as &ldquo;panic peddling,&rdquo; this practice urged whites to sell before it was &ldquo;too late&rdquo; and &ldquo;the blacks&rdquo; lowered their property values. Agents might hire black subagents to walk or drive through a changing neighborhood to solicit business or behave in such a way to exaggerate white fears. In these scenarios, worried whites would sell their home cheaply and a panic peddler would inflate the price to, in turn, sell the home to a black family.</p><p>At the Chicago History Museum, I unearthed original BAPA newsletters from the 1970s. BAPA implored homeowners to sign &ldquo;letters of agency&rdquo; to prevent unauthorized solicitation from real estate agents. These letters asserted homeowners had no intention to sell. BAPA kept the letters on file and served &ldquo;uncooperative&rdquo; real estate firms with a notice to cease solicitation. Homeowners also refrained from putting for-sale signs in their yard.</p><p>Dolan told the Tribune in 1976: &ldquo;White families in urban areas must realize they can&rsquo;t run away from blacks. And they must realize that middle-class blacks and whites both want the same things &ndash; good schools, good services, low crime rate. At the same time, blacks are realizing that a neighborhood that is all one race increases the process of deterioration.&rdquo;</p><p>Between 1970 and 1980, the black population in Beverly grew from .1 percent to almost 14 percent. My aunt Joyce Bristow, a retired Chicago Public Schools administrator, was among the wave of those first black families.</p><p>She and her husband had been living in Little Italy and wanted to put down roots on the South Side near family. They felt Hyde Park was too congested and the houses in Chatham too old. In 1977, the couple fell in love with a tri-level house in Beverly.</p><p>&ldquo;It was a neighborhood that was always fascinating,&rdquo; Aunt Joyce said. &ldquo;I wanted diversity but that wasn&rsquo;t the main selling point. The house was the main selling point.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m always proud to say I&rsquo;ve lived in Beverly for 35 years. People are always taken aback by that.&rdquo;</p><p>Financially, it has been a good decision; her property value is up 300 percent. But that first year someone threw rocks in the big picture window off of the living room. My aunt said she assumed it was racially motivated.</p><p>&ldquo;We knew people weren&rsquo;t happy about blacks in Beverly. It made me nervous. A lot of times I closed the drapes. It made my parents very nervous.&rdquo;</p><p>Only one other black family resided on the well-manicured block when my aunt moved in. (Today there are at least 10.) Back then, apparently, that made the lone black owner nervous. Aunt Joyce said he filed a complaint against her black real estate agent for selling to another black on the block.<a name="censusdata2"></a></p><hr /><p><i>Chart: Racial makeup of South Side neighborhoods (1950-2013)</i><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0Am-AbC8HDbXMdGhITU9jTkt1YTNxd1NhN2hPaUV5U2c&transpose=0&headers=1&range=A1%3AC56&gid=0&pub=1","options":{"titleTextStyle":{"fontSize":16},"vAxes":[{"useFormatFromData":true,"title":"Left vertical axis title","minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null}],"sortColumn":null,"booleanRole":"certainty","title":"Chart title","showRowNumber":false,"annotations":{"domain":{"style":"line"}},"alternatingRowStyle":true,"hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"title":"Horizontal axis title","minValue":null,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null},"width":600,"height":371},"state":{},"view":{"columns":[0,{"label":"WHITE","properties":{"role":"annotation"},"sourceColumn":1},{"label":"BLACK","properties":{"role":"annotationText"},"sourceColumn":2}]},"isDefaultVisualization":true,"chartType":"Table","chartName":"Chart 1"} </script></p><p><i>Sources: Local Community Fact Book of Chicago, Woodstock Institute</i></p><p><strong>Racial steering</strong></p><p>Presumably, my aunt&rsquo;s neighbor feared so-called &ldquo;racial steering&rdquo; on his block. BAPA publicly worried about re-segregation in Beverly, too. They didn&rsquo;t want real estate agents selling homes consecutively, say three or more, to blacks on any given block.</p><p>Charles Shanabruch, who&rsquo;s white, led BAPA in the 1980s. I met up with him at a downtown Chicago coffee shop. He moved to Beverly in the late 1970s with his wife and two sons.<img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/historic%20society%20embed%20photo%20FOR%20WEB.png" style="float: right; height: 192px; width: 300px;" title="WBEZ reporter Natalie Moore, right, flips through original documents from the Beverly Area Planning Association with question-asker Erin McDuffie, left, at the Ridge Historical Society. (WBEZ/Logan Jaffe)" /></p><p>&ldquo;It was a diverse community; that was important to us,&rdquo; Shanabruch said. Blacks continued to move to the neighborhood but another real estate force threatened that progress.</p><p>In the mid-1980s, Beverly, and a dozen integrated south and western suburbs conducted a testing program in which black and white couples of comparable incomes posed as potential home buyers to see how real estate agents treated them. BAPA said white testers were discouraged from racially integrated areas and black testers usually were steered away from homes in predominantly white suburbs. My aunt and late uncle &ndash; then a BAPA board member &ndash; were testers.</p><p>BAPA sued four Southwest suburban real estate firms for steering blacks to Beverly only. White clients were told they wouldn&rsquo;t want to live in Beverly because they wouldn&rsquo;t be comfortable in an integrated neighborhood. BAPA lost the first case and settled the other four. Real estate agents went through training, but more importantly, Shanabruch said it put the industry on notice.</p><p>&ldquo;I still have a visceral reaction,&rdquo; Shanabruch said of the first case. &ldquo;The problem was the jury was an all-white jury. Every time a black came up to be considered, the defense did a preempt [to keep blacks off.]&rdquo;</p><p>Realtors struck back. They sued BAPA, accusing the organization of trying to keep suburban brokers from doing business in Beverly and Morgan Park. BAPA prevailed against the lawsuit.</p><p>But some proponents of open housing took umbrage with BAPA. Frank Williams, a realtor, Beverly resident and president of the South Side NAACP branch told <em>The Chicago Tribune</em> in 1985: &ldquo;What is the difference between Cicero, which says we don&rsquo;t want any of you, and a community like Beverly, which says we are going to practice integration maintenance and we will do everything possible not to allow any more than three of you on a block? I don&rsquo;t see a difference.&rdquo;</p><p>Shanabruch, then and now, insisted Beverly did not have a quota system to keep a racial balance. In a <em>Tribune</em> letter to the editor, he wrote: &ldquo;If only blacks are being shown houses in certain areas of our neighborhood or on certain blocks, we watch more carefully, encouraging blacks to look at other parts of the neighborhood and other areas in order to offset any effect that dealers&rsquo; steering might have. Likewise, we encourage whites not to limit their options, but encourage them to consider the aforementioned block.&rdquo;</p><p>During our recent coffee, Shanabruch told me he worried resegregation on a block-by-block level would&rsquo;ve made whites nervous and disrupted the neighborhood. BAPA saw the neighborhood in competition with suburbs like Oak Park and Evanston, communities that put a premium on integration. BAPA placed ads in <em>Chicago</em> magazine and set up booths and home fairs. The pitch? If you like architecture, great schools and leafy canopies, come to Beverly.</p><p><strong>Integrated Schools</strong></p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/sutherland%20photo%201.jpg" style="height: 180px; width: 320px; float: right;" title="Sutherland Elementary School was part of a desegregation plan in the early 1980s. (WBEZ/Logan Jaffe)" />I grew up in Chatham, but my siblings and I rode a yellow school bus to attend Sutherland Elementary in Beverly. In the early 1980s, Chicago Public Schools unveiled a<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1981/04/04/us/chicago-announces-plans-to-desegregate-schools.html"> desegregation plan</a> for students that included busing. My parents loved our black middle-class neighborhood but felt strongly that their three children should receive an integrated education. I didn&rsquo;t realize I was part of a social experiment until much later in college. I just knew that only black kids rode the bus and I couldn&rsquo;t walk home for lunch. Not just because it was too far, but because unlike many of my white classmates&rsquo; mothers, mine worked during the day.</p><p>Overall, I loved Sutherland, loved my teachers and had black and white friends over for sleepovers, and vice versa. But I did experience odd moments of racial consciousness at a young age in Beverly. For a long time I thought only white kids ate white bread and black kids ate wheat bread, based on what I saw at the lunch tables. Imagine my surprise when one day I saw a white classmate unwrap his sandwich with wheat bread. Then there was gym class, which I hated because the teacher was mean to me. A few years ago, I ran into our beloved former principal, who&rsquo;s white, and told him the story. He explained the gym teacher eventually left because she didn&rsquo;t adapt too well to new black kids in the school.</p><p>During this time Beverly leaders like Shanabruch pushed for magnet schools and enhanced programs &ndash; like the one at Sutherland called Options for Knowledge - to keep and attract families. Sometimes white families stayed, but the neighborhood schools remained strong irrespective of racial composition.</p><p>Jennifer Smith, who is white, grew up in Beverly along with her six siblings. They all attended Vanderpoel Magnet for elementary school in the 1980s. One year she was the only white girl in her classroom.</p><p>&ldquo;When I was a kid, I didn&rsquo;t really think about the fact that all of my friends were African American. It was just normal,&rdquo; Smith said. Her parents believed in public education. Smith and her younger sister were best friends with two black sisters on their block.</p><p>The racial tension came from elsewhere.</p><p>&ldquo;I feel in the 1980s, there was a sharp divide between the (white) Catholic school kids and the (white) public school kids. Most of the white people in Beverly sent their kids to Catholic schools,&rdquo; Smith said. &ldquo;We got called a lot of racial epithets like &lsquo;n-word lover.&rsquo; But it didn&rsquo;t shake our world up too much. We would throw stuff back and fight with them.&rdquo;<a name="cpsdata"></a></p><script type="text/javascript" src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/static/modules/gviz/1.0/chart.js"> {"dataSourceUrl":"//docs.google.com/a/chicagopublicradio.org/spreadsheet/tq?key=0Am-AbC8HDbXMdEd1QWFEbVhlZW1xVDRxOW1ibl9jRGc&transpose=0&headers=1&range=A1%3AC7&gid=0&pub=1","options":{"titleTextStyle":{"bold":true,"color":"#000","fontSize":16},"series":{"0":{"errorBars":{"errorType":"none"},"color":"#c9daf8"}},"animation":{"duration":500},"theme":"maximized","width":600,"hAxis":{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"viewWindowMode":null,"viewWindow":null,"maxValue":null},"vAxes":[{"useFormatFromData":true,"title":null,"minValue":null,"logScale":false,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null},{"useFormatFromData":true,"minValue":null,"logScale":false,"viewWindow":{"min":null,"max":null},"maxValue":null}],"booleanRole":"certainty","title":"Racial makeup of public schools in Beverly","height":371,"domainAxis":{"direction":1},"legend":"in","focusTarget":"category","isStacked":true,"tooltip":{}},"state":{},"view":{},"isDefaultVisualization":false,"chartType":"ColumnChart","chartName":"Chart 1"} </script><p><span id="cke_bm_366S" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><span id="cke_bm_367S" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><span id="cke_bm_368S" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><span id="cke_bm_371S" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><i>Source: Chicago Public Schools</i><span id="cke_bm_371E" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><span id="cke_bm_368E" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><span id="cke_bm_367E" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span><span id="cke_bm_366E" style="display: none;">&nbsp;</span></p><p>Back in the early 1990s, then 16-year-old Morgan Park High School student Todd Clayton and a group of black friends would play basketball at Beverly Park on West 102nd Street. One day, he recalled, a group of white boys with bats and chains chased them away screaming &ldquo;Nigger, this is our park.&rdquo; Clayton and his friends ran to a nearby gas station payphone to call the police.</p><p>&ldquo;When the police arrived on the scene, they didn&rsquo;t do anything to the boys that were still in the park. They told us it would be best for us to stay away from the park to avoid trouble,&rdquo; Clayton said.</p><p>Clayton said they ignored the police officers&rsquo; warning and kept coming back to the park &ndash; but with more guys as &ldquo;reinforcement.&rdquo; The white guys didn&rsquo;t bother them again.</p><p>&ldquo;Our main point was we weren&rsquo;t going to be pushed away,&rdquo; Clayton said. &ldquo;We evened the number for a fair fight if it came to that.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>Today&rsquo;s Beverly</strong></p><p>The public schools in Beverly today don&rsquo;t necessarily reflect the diversity of the neighborhood. <a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/chicagos-beverly-neighborhood-integration-no-accident-109922#cpsdata">(See chart.)</a></p><p>Most chalk it up to the strong Irish-Catholic identity and Catholic schools in the community. <a href="http://morganparkcps.org/special_programs.jsp">Morgan Park High School</a> now has a wall-to-wall International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme that current BAPA executive director Matt Walsh hopes will be a draw to families.</p><p>Walsh said BAPA&rsquo;s annual home tour, <a href="http://www.bapa.org/RIDGERUN/">Ridge Run</a> and other special events are used to lure people to the area. &ldquo;People here want to live in a racially diverse community. We continue to work on it,&rdquo; Walsh said, acknowledging that people don&rsquo;t always socialize as much as he would like. Recently, the <a href="http://www.beverlyartcenter.org/">Beverly Arts Center</a> hired<a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/beverly-arts-center-hires-new-executive-director-109725"> Heather Ireland Robinson</a>, in part, to bring in more diverse programming.</p><p>But challenges remain. In late February, a musician wrote in his&nbsp;<a href="http://icestentatious06.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/too-many-black-people-at-mcnallys-says-chicago-police-officer/">blog</a> about an untoward racial incident at McNally&rsquo;s, a bar on 111th and Western &ndash; technically the Morgan Park neighborhood. Many of the bars on Western Avenue between Beverly and Morgan Park have a reputation &ndash; rightly or wrongly &ndash; of not being open to blacks. The blog post spread via social media. &nbsp;</p><p>I called McNally&rsquo;s and was told the bar did not have a statement.</p><p>BAPA swiftly responded with an e-mail blast: &ldquo;Recently, an incident which allegedly occurred at a local establishment generated a whirlwind of passionate conversations on diversity in Beverly Hills/Morgan Park. While BAPA does not have all the details or specific facts involving this incident, it is clear from the exchanges on blogs, emails, Facebook, Twitter and other forms of social media that diversity, whether it be racial or ethnic, is an important cornerstone of this community. In fact, Beverly Hills/Morgan Park is one of the most integrated neighborhoods in Chicago, and BAPA has a rich history in working to achieve this&hellip;. With so many neighbors reaching out to BAPA and the greater online community to share their commitment to integration, diversity and inclusion, we truly do believe that we have a new &lsquo;shot at greatness.&rsquo; Bring us your concerns and your ideas, get involved in not just the conversation but the connection.&rdquo;</p><p>So, is that connection something Curious City question-asker Erin McDuffie feels living in Beverly today?</p><p>&ldquo;As far as the South Side is concerned, it means something to people &ndash; and to white people in Beverly in particular &ndash; to have integration,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;And I think for black families who live here, my hope is that we feel accepted and know that&rsquo;s coming from a genuine place.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" target="_blank">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter. Follow her&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/natalieymoore" target="_blank">@natalieymoore</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 26 Mar 2014 16:14:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/curious-city/chicagos-beverly-neighborhood-integration-no-accident-109922