WBEZ | Englewood http://www.wbez.org/tags/englewood Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Morning Shift: July 20, 2015 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-20/morning-shift-july-20-2015-112428 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/215539596&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">A shooting over the weekend breaks two weekends without shootings for Chicago&#39;s Englewood. We talk with members of a group called Mothers Against Senseless Killings, who have been patrolling some of the hot-spots in Englewood. We&rsquo;ll also learn more about a pretty sizable mobile sculpture that&rsquo;s emblazoned with the names of kids and teenagers killed by gun violence. Plus, we examine what Chicago needs to do to draw Chinese businesses and investors. And we take a look back at the Eastland disaster, which claimed the lives of more than 800 people 100 years ago Friday.</span></p></p> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 11:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-20/morning-shift-july-20-2015-112428 Members of Mothers Against Senseless Killings combat Englewood gun violence http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-20/members-mothers-against-senseless-killings-combat-englewood-gun <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/mothers group.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago&rsquo;s Englewood is a neighborhood nationally known for being violent. So it was a surprise for many when there were NO reports of shootings there over the Fourth of July weekend OR the following weekend. Unfortunately, that trend was short-lived, with the report of a shooting death early Saturday morning. At last week&rsquo;s Chicago Police Board meeting, police superintendent Garry McCarthy said the absence of gunfire was due in large part to the collective work of a group of mothers who decided to stand guard on corners in the neighborhood. Tamar Manasseh of <a href="http://www.getbehindthemask.org/">Mothers Against Senseless Killings</a> joins us to talk about the initiative and why women are taking the dominant role in getting the violence under control in Englewood.</p></p> Mon, 20 Jul 2015 11:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift/2015-07-20/members-mothers-against-senseless-killings-combat-englewood-gun Despite tensions, city lets police-community meetings dwindle http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-tensions-city-lets-police-community-meetings-dwindle-112340 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/CAPS-Lindsey-regular.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Chicago shootings and murders are up this year. In many cases, police officers are having a hard time finding witnesses willing to talk.</p><p>This is not a new problem. It&rsquo;s a reason Chicago helped pioneer what&rsquo;s known as community policing &mdash; the sort of crime fighting that focuses on trust between officers and residents. But a cornerstone of that approach is crumbling, according to internal police numbers obtained by WBEZ.</p><p>That cornerstone consists of meetings that bring together residents and cops across the city. The meetings, designed to take place monthly in each of the city&rsquo;s 280 police beats, made Chicago policing a national model in the 1990s.</p><p>The city called its approach the Chicago Alternative Policing Strategy. CAPS beat-meeting attendance peaked in 2002, when the citywide total was 70,024.</p><p>Since then turnout has fallen by more than two-thirds, according to the police figures, obtained through an Illinois Freedom of Information Act request. During Mayor Rahm Emanuel&rsquo;s administration, it has dropped every year. Last year&rsquo;s attendance &mdash; 20,420 &mdash; was less than half the turnout in 2010, the year before Emanuel took office.</p><p data-pym-src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/caps-attendance/child.html">&nbsp;</p><script src="http://s3.amazonaws.com/wbez-dailygraphics/dailygraphics/graphics/caps-attendance/js/lib/pym.js" type="text/javascript"></script><p>One reason for the decline could be simple. Compared to when Chicago launched CAPS, crime is down. So residents have fewer problems to take to the police.</p><p>But that&rsquo;s not the whole story. Over the years, the city has cut down on CAPS officers and the program&rsquo;s paid civilian organizers. It has cut overtime for officers to attend the beat meetings. And it has cut the number of meetings. Residents have fewer opportunities to participate.</p><p>&ldquo;Most police officers hated beat meetings,&rdquo; said former Chicago cop Howard Lindsey, who helped with CAPS in the city&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood before retiring from the police department last year. &ldquo;The officers didn&rsquo;t believe in CAPS. They just felt like it was a waste of time to actually go to these meetings and listen to the citizens complain.&rdquo;</p><p>Emanuel says the city remains committed to community policing. This year he created a top police position to focus on it. Police Supt. Garry McCarthy, for his part, is on an &ldquo;outreach tour&rdquo; this summer. The tour consists of closed-door meetings with residents of more than a dozen neighborhoods.</p><p>The department says it is also developing a new community-policing strategy, but so far is not talking with WBEZ about what role the CAPS beat meetings would play.</p><p>Our audio story (listen above) looks at the status of the beat meetings through the eyes of Lindsey as well as a former civilian beat-meeting facilitator in the Back of the Yards neighborhood, a Loyola University Chicago sociologist who studied CAPS after working three decades as a Chicago police officer, and a current beat-meeting attendee in West Humboldt Park.</p><p>That attendee, an elementary-school clerk named Antwan McHenry, says the beat meetings could play an important role as police officers face more suspicion due to events in places like Ferguson and Baltimore.</p><p>&ldquo;African Americans have been taught things like, &lsquo;You don&rsquo;t talk to police, you don&rsquo;t snitch,&rsquo; &rdquo; McHenry said. &ldquo;So if you grow up thinking that, you don&rsquo;t get to see the other part &mdash; like when, if your neighbor gets shot, you have to work hand-in-hand with the police to solve murders and to solve crimes.&rdquo;</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/cmitchell-0">Chip Mitchell</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s West Side bureau reporter. Follow him on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/ChipMitchell1">@ChipMitchell1</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZoutloud">@WBEZoutloud</a>, and connect with him through <a href="https://www.facebook.com/chipmitchell1">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://plus.google.com/111079509307132701769" rel="me">Google+</a> and <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/ChipMitchell1">LinkedIn</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 08 Jul 2015 05:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/despite-tensions-city-lets-police-community-meetings-dwindle-112340 In Englewood, kids and cops find common ground on baseball diamond http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/englewood-kids-and-cops-find-common-ground-baseball-diamond-112155 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Image4.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Strained relationships between the police and the community are unfortunately common in many cities, and Chicago is no different. From the acquittal of Chicago police officer Dante Servin for killing Rekia Boyd, to the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by two Chicago officers, the trust in law enforcement remains shaky.</p><p>One South Side community group aims to help mend the fences by getting Chicago cops and kids from Englewood playing baseball together. Teamwork Englewood organized the Englewood Police/Youth Baseball League earlier this year to get cops in a coaching and mentoring role. The co-ed league is housed at Hamilton Park and the teams are almost ready for opening day on June 24.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="100" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/209374756&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Mon, 08 Jun 2015 11:51:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/lifestyle/englewood-kids-and-cops-find-common-ground-baseball-diamond-112155 As Whole Foods breaks ground, Englewood residents make their pitch http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/whole-foods-breaks-ground-englewood-residents-make-their-pitch-111995 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/wf.PNG" alt="" /><p><p>It&rsquo;s been more than a year-and-a-half since Whole Foods announced it was setting up shop in Chicago&rsquo;s Englewood neighborhood, and the store&rsquo;s opening is still more than a year away.</p><p>But that doesn&rsquo;t mean the community is sitting idly by. Residents are actively engaging with Whole Foods about the role of an organic grocery store chain in a food desert at the corner of 63rd and Halsted.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s been wonderful. I think that Whole Foods has been very committed to everything going on here,&rdquo; said Glen Fulton, executive director of the Greater Englewood Community Development Corporation, whose office is across the street in a U.S. Bank branch overlooking the construction site.</p><p>When the high-end grocer first announced it was moving to this high-poverty community some Chicagoans were shocked. But the company is trying to shed its elite label &mdash; it says part of its mission is bringing healthy options to areas riddled with junk food.</p><p>Store officials say prices will be competitive and affordable here. They also say Whole Foods is committed to being more than just an anchor tenant on a vacant lot.</p><p>The company first tested this food desert experiment a couple years ago in Detroit. It was the first national grocer to come into the city and so far it&rsquo;s been mostly a success.</p><p>In Englewood, Whole Foods has held community meetings and listened to residents who want classes on nutrition and shopping on a budget.</p><p>Fulton said he went straight to Whole Foods&rsquo; CEO with one request.</p><p>&ldquo;The first thing I wanted was for small businesses to be a part of this whole initiative for this Englewood community. Meaning that I need your support in trying to help them do business with Whole Food,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Fulton is a former director of supplier diversity at Albertsons, another major grocery chain.</p><p>&ldquo;And the second part is that we include diversity as far as diverse suppliers are concerned. So if you&rsquo;re a person of color or a woman, let&rsquo;s break down the barriers&nbsp;of trying to do business with Whole Foods,&rdquo; he said.</p><p>Rachel Bernier-Green, a black South Sider, attended a free small business workshop series and learned about proper licensing and packaging. She owns &lsquo;Laine&rsquo;s Bake Shop and met a Whole Foods district manager.</p><p>&ldquo;He came out to our table and took the rest of the cookies of his favorite flavor, everything I had on display that day. So I think they enjoyed the texture of the cookies,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>So much so that Whole Foods worked with Bernier-Green to find a distributor.</p><p>Soon her mocha raspberry, citrus spritz and butter pecan bites will be in three Chicago Whole Foods. Next year the desserts will be in the store at 63rd and Halsted.</p><p>&ldquo;I think they were also impressed with the story of our company, why we exist and what we plan to do,&rdquo; Bernier-Green added.</p><p>Her small family-owned business has a social mission: hiring those who have struggled with homelessness as well as the formerly incarcerated. Each year hundreds of parolees with criminal records return to Englewood and can&rsquo;t find work.</p><p>&ldquo;We wanted to know, Whole Foods, are you going to hire people with records? We had been previously told that hands-down no, they aren&rsquo;t going to hire anybody with records,&rdquo; said Sonya Harper, executive director of Grow Greater Englewood, a food justice group. &ldquo;Whole Foods really heard our concerns as a community and they are now coming up with a program to hire people with records at that store.&rdquo;</p><p>Whole Foods says it wants to partner with social service agencies to increase opportunities for those facing employment barriers.</p><p>Meanwhile, &lsquo;Laine&rsquo;s Bake Shop is the only new confirmed supplier for the Englewood Whole Foods.</p><p>Store officials say more shelf space is available and they hope to develop some brand new businesses in the process.</p><p>There&rsquo;s still time. The next small business workshop series will be this fall.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a></em></p><p><em>Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Thu, 07 May 2015 04:48:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/whole-foods-breaks-ground-englewood-residents-make-their-pitch-111995 Chicago Ald. JoAnn Thompson dies http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-ald-joann-thompson-dies-111530 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/JoAnn-Thompson-Head-Shot-Transparent.png" style="height: 273px; width: 200px; float: left;" title="16th Ward Ald. Joann Thompson died Tuesday Feb. 10, 2015. (Courtesy aldermanthompson.com)" />Chicago Ald. JoAnn Thompson (16th) has died from sudden heart failure.</p><p>Thompson missed a debate last weekend for medical reasons. At the time, her campaign manager said the alderman had undergone a medical procedure but her prognosis was good.&nbsp;</p><p>Thompson&#39;s ward covers Englewood and Gage Park on the city&#39;s South Side.</p><p>The alderman&#39;s chief of staff, Debbie Blair, said Thompson died surrounded by her family, friends and &quot;lots of love from the greater Englewood community which she served with devotion to her final day.&quot; Thompson was 58.</p><p>Thompson was known by many for her recent efforts to bring a Whole Foods to Englewood, raise the minimum wage, and neighborhood initiatives like the 16th Ward Festival on 63rd street. &nbsp;</p><p>South Side Ald. Roderick Sawyer (6th) knew Thompson before her City Council days, and he says even though he didn&#39;t side with Emanuel as often as Thompson did, the two council members found ways to work together.</p><p>&quot;Sometimes, we had to work, like we called it an inside outside game. But we were fighting for the same thing. She was working internally within the constructs of the administration, I would work as a fighter on the outside, but we were working for the same cause,&quot; Sawyer said.</p><p>Others remember her as a &quot;genuine&quot; and &quot;honest&quot; leader.</p><p>&quot;I would say the alderman was a litmus test. It was either yes or no with her. And that&#39;s good, because you didn&#39;t have anything between. She was very straightforth with her opinions, she was very honest with her opinions,&quot; said Glen Fulton, President of the Greater Englewood CDC.</p><p>Thompson was in a heated election battle with 15th ward Ald.Toni Foulkes. Foulkes is a member of the progressive caucus, whose ward was shifted in the remap. She&#39;s faced some attacks from a pro-Emanuel PAC.</p><p>Today, Ald. Foulkes said she was &quot;deeply saddened&quot; to hear of Thompsons&#39;s death.</p><p>&quot;We worked together as members of the Black Caucus on many important policy initiatives since we were both elected in 2007,&quot; Foulkes said in a statement. &ldquo;I admired her fierce commitment to the constituents and communities of the 16th Ward.&quot;</p><p>Members of the Black Caucus said &quot;today is not a day of politics&quot; and celebrated Thompson as an &quot;exceptional alderman, member of the Black caucus and most of all, a fighter for her community.&quot;</p><p>Thompson was born on the South Side of Chicago.</p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 10 Feb 2015 08:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago-ald-joann-thompson-dies-111530 Englewood girls learn how to restore furniture, and their community http://www.wbez.org/news/englewood-girls-learn-how-restore-furniture-and-their-community-110759 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/furniture%20thumb.jpg" title="Jamika Smith is the founder of Teena’s Legacy, a furniture reupholstery apprenticeship program named for her grandmother. (Courtesy of Jamika Smith)" /></div><p>Four young women are in an airy living room in the Chicago Lawn neighborhood. They are learning how to reupholster second-hand furniture. As the sound of a stapler echoes throughout the home, one is pulling them out from a worn chair.</p><p>Across the room Laquisha Clinton refurbishes a foot stool. She picked out some fabric the color of regal purple.</p><p>&ldquo;It shows my gratitude and attitude toward fashion,&rdquo; Clinton said.</p><p>Jamika Smith is trying to teach a trade that she hopes will lead to self discovery for a group of Englewood girls. There&rsquo;s a lot of talk about the high youth unemployment rate in Chicago. For black youth, the figure is close to 90 percent. But girls are sometimes left out of the conversation.</p><p>Smith first learned how to restore furniture from her grandmother Miss Teena. As a teen, she didn&rsquo;t always appreciate her grandmother&rsquo;s skills. &nbsp;</p><p>&ldquo;I did not,&rdquo; Smith said laughing. &ldquo;But she used to have my brother and I garbage dump. Go down alleys and pick up dressers and chairs and things to that nature so it was kind of embarrassing.&rdquo;</p><p>But the garbage dump isn&rsquo;t so bad now. That&rsquo;s where she finds pieces for the girls in her apprentice group. She calls it <a href="https://www.facebook.com/teenalegacy">Teena&rsquo;s Legacy</a> in honor of her late grandmother.</p><p>Smith said learning a trade is important but she has bigger aspirations for these girls.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s more of how these young women find out who they are as individuals, finding out what is their style. Finding out what do they like and what kind of woman to they aspire to be.&rdquo;</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/furniture%20inset.jpg" style="height: 444px; width: 250px; margin-left: 5px; margin-right: 5px; float: left;" title="Laquisha Clinton refurbishes a foot stool as part of Teena’s Legacy. (Natalie Moore/WBEZ)" />For Smith, repairing furniture is a metaphor.</p><p>&ldquo;The whole concept is you have this chair that needs restoring and reviving and there may be something in your life that needs restoring and reviving, too.&rdquo;</p><p>All the girls are from Englewood, a neighborhood rocked by high unemployment and poverty with few activities for youth.</p><p>&ldquo;I probably would be outside with my friends all summer on the streets even though I know the streets can be dangerous,&rdquo; said 17-year old Jannie Ross. She&rsquo;s wearing a Cleveland Browns football jersey as she puts the final touches on a cotton candy colored chair. She painted it pink and added fake fur.</p><p>&ldquo;Fluffy is just like my personality. Bubbly. The pink feels sympathy for me. Because I have a lot of sympathy for some people I know going through a lot of stuff like I am,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Now Jannie&rsquo;s adding rhinestones. The blinged-out chair looks like it belongs in a Las Vegas hotel.</p><p>Teena&rsquo;s Legacy is a pilot summer program. Smith wants to raise more money to work with more girls throughout the year.</p><p>Smith said her young charges may not go into the furniture business full time. She hasn&rsquo;t. But knowing a trade gives them a chance to earn a little money on the side.</p><p>&ldquo;At the end of the day it&rsquo;s important that we invest in our women because they are powerful and they do have influence,&rdquo; Smith said.</p><p>Take Shawtiana Clinton, for example. She took an &ldquo;ugly brown chair,&rdquo; as she describes it, and put a new pattern on it.</p><p>&ldquo;I picked cheetah because it&rsquo;s powerful.&rdquo;</p><p>Shawtiana said that print now makes her feel powerful.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter. <a href="mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>&nbsp;Follow Natalie on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>, &nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a></em></p></p> Fri, 05 Sep 2014 12:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/englewood-girls-learn-how-restore-furniture-and-their-community-110759 Morning Shift: Activist shows another side of Englewood http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-02/morning-shift-activist-shows-another-side-englewood <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Englewood Flickr frankebones.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We hear what&#39;s happening on the same sex marriage front as the law officially takes effect in Illinois. We also have music from Chicago singer songwriter Daniela Sloan. Plus, a look at this month&#39;s Midwest Independent Film Festival with a movie shot in Chicago.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-activist-shows-another-side-of-engle/embed?header=false&border=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-activist-shows-another-side-of-engle.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-activist-shows-another-side-of-engle" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Activist shows another side of Englewood " on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 02 Jun 2014 08:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-06-02/morning-shift-activist-shows-another-side-englewood Teens learning radio skills in Chicago police program http://www.wbez.org/news/teens-learning-radio-skills-chicago-police-program-109447 <p><p>A pair of police officers on Chicago&rsquo;s South Side are helping teens learn radio production in an effort to keep them off the streets and improve their views on cops.</p><p>The program in the Englewood neighborhood fits with a push by Chicago Police Department Superintendent Garry McCarthy to improve the relationship between police officers and the people they serve.</p><p>It is called the 7th District Youth Anti-Violence Media Program. It introduces teens to the ins and outs of radio production, and gives them a chance to get on the air.</p><p>The classes are held three days a week at Kennedy-King College. The broadcasting instructors there pitch in to teach the kids.</p><p>The program was started by Daliah Goree-Pruitt and Claudette Knight, both community policing (or CAPS) officers. The two started out as beat cops. Now they are in charge of neighborhood outreach, counseling crime victims, and running community meetings &nbsp;in a neighborhood struggling with some of the highest crime rates in the city.</p><p>The two had a lot to do already. Knight and Goree-Pruitt also do a weekly food give-away and hand out turkeys before Thanksgiving. On the Saturday before Christmas, they gave away toys at the station house located at 1438 W. 63rd Street.</p><p>But 7th District Deputy Chief Leo Schmitz came to them last spring with a new task.</p><p>&ldquo;He was like, &lsquo;Think of something that we can do for the kids,&rsquo;&rdquo; Goree-Pruitt said.</p><p>Schmitz was worried about the summer then coming up, when hot temperatures and idle teens could contribute to a spike in violent crime.</p><p>Knight said they wanted to do something new.</p><p>&ldquo;You know, something different, some other added activity because you always hear basketball, baseball, but not all kids are sports-inclined,&rdquo; Knight said.</p><p>They wanted to do a swim program, but they could not get the funding. Goree-Pruitt said the only thing the department had money for was t-shirts for the participants. So Goree-Pruitt and Knight needed partners.</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/CAPS%202%20%281%29.jpg" style="height: 272px; width: 350px; float: right;" title="Jamar Houston of WKKC teaches Jermaine Robinson how to DJ. (WBEZ/Patrick Smith)" /></div><p>Kennedy-King College, about a mile west of the 7th District station, has a broadcasting department and its own radio station, WKKC. Knight said it was the &ldquo;perfect opportunity.&rdquo; They approached the college and got the OK.</p><p>So all they needed were students. This turned out to not be easy. The two went personally to high school principals in the area, asking them to recommend students for the program&hellip; and they got almost no response. Then they asked area pastors - again, nothing.</p><p>So Goree-Pruitt and Knight just started approaching random kids on the street and around the neighborhood.</p><p>That&rsquo;s how Genavie Clark heard about it.</p><p>&ldquo;One day [I was] sitting in Dunkin&rsquo; Donuts, and all the officers were sitting in Dunkin&rsquo; Donuts, and Officer Goree came up to my table and she told us about the radio program. So I signed up for it,&rdquo; Genavie said.</p><p>Ultimately, the two got 20 teens of high school age for that first summer class, and it went so well they did a smaller after-school version this fall.</p><p>The program gets by mostly on the power of Goree-Pruitt and Knight&rsquo;s charisma, which is considerable. But these two career cops know nothing about radio production, and they do not have any money to pay instructors.</p><p>So the students learn mostly by observing WKKC in action.</p><p>The kids are exposed to a lot of the skills that go into producing a radio show: hosting, logging tape, mixing audio - even DJ-ing.</p><p>Station manager Dennis Snipe comes in every once in awhile to talk to the students about diction and public speaking, the assistant program director lets them look over her shoulder while she logs tape, and the hosts give them pointers during music breaks.</p><p>The summer classes were from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., so the students had to be fed. The owner of a shopping plaza across the street from the station donated Subway sandwiches.</p><p>So it&rsquo;s a nice story. But at first glance, none of it seems much like police work.</p><p>Knight disagrees.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s all about community interaction, because the youth especially, most of their interaction with the police is negative. So if you start introducing a positive interaction at a teenage level, then they start to view us in a different way,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>WBEZ ran a story on Dec. 23 about <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/8000-chicago-cops-now-little-friendlier-109425">police legitimacy training: thousands of Chicago cops re-learning how to best interact with the people they serve.</a></p><p>Efforts such as the radio program and legitimacy training fit with Superintendent McCarthy&rsquo;s priority on what he calls a return to community policing.</p><p>A recent study by Yale criminologist Andrew Papachristos found that Chicago in 2013 has had its lowest violent-crime rate in the past three decades. McCarthy credits community policing with a decrease in crime.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt believes it&rsquo;s part of her job to connect with people.</p><p>&ldquo;I feel like I can help these kids. I may not help all of them, but the ones that I can help, they&rsquo;ll know the police department just don&rsquo;t lock kids up,&rdquo; she said.</p><p>Besides teaching them how to produce a radio show and to like cops, the officers use the class as a way to help the students deal with their own issues. They talk to the students about resolving conflicts, safe sex, and staying out of trouble.</p><p>Before they start the radio lessons, the students gather around a round table in a small windowless room across from the WKKC studios.</p><p>One of the girls is talking to Goree-Pruitt about problems she is having with her stepmom. She says her dad is getting a divorce, and he blames her.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt councils her on being the mature one, even though her stepmom is the adult.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve had the same issues, having two parents to living with just my mom, to my mom getting remarried, to my mom getting rid of all four of her daughters to be with this new husband, to my dad raising four daughters by himself. So I am no different from you all. Like I tell you all, because we&rsquo;re the police doesn&rsquo;t mean that we&rsquo;re not human,&rdquo; Goree-Pruitt told them.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt and Knight look tougher than they sound, and they both spent time on the beat, dealing with high-stress situations. But they also have families of their own, so maybe it is not surprising that they connect so well with teens.</p><p>&ldquo;When I come here it just, all my stress just goes away,&rdquo; freshman Wattsita Henley said.</p><p>The fall class, which ended earlier this month, was five high schoolers, three girls and two boys, and most did not seem like the types police really need to worry about.</p><p>Freshman James Cross Jr. said the closest he has ever gotten to drugs is seeing weed in a bag at school.</p><p>&ldquo;One of my friends showed me a bag, and I don&rsquo;t know why but I just started laughing,&rdquo; James &nbsp;told the group.</p><p>The other boy, Jermaine Robinson, has gotten into some trouble in the past.</p><p>He left Englewood to live with his grandmother in suburban Hazel Crest for a few years. &nbsp;He said he came back because it was just too quiet out there.</p><p>Robinson is about to start at Winnie Mandela, an alternative high school in the South Shore neighborhood.</p><p>He likes working with his hands, so he is trying to learn how to DJ.</p><p>His ultimate goal is to be a computer engineer.</p><p>&ldquo;Because like, when I was in 5th grade we did a program, and I earned a computer and I was taking it apart and putting it back together and stuff like that,&rdquo; Jermaine said.</p><p>Goree-Pruitt said she is not worried about what type of kids they are reaching, adding that she is just glad to be reaching any.</p><p>&ldquo; All I can say is that you touch one you reach another one, because they&rsquo;ll tell, they&rsquo;ll tell their friends.&rdquo;</p><p>The next radio class starts in January.</p><p>Patrick Smith is a WBEZ producer and reporter. Follow him <a href="https://twitter.com/pksmid">@pksmid</a>.</p></p> Fri, 27 Dec 2013 14:49:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/teens-learning-radio-skills-chicago-police-program-109447 Whole Foods plans to replicate Detroit success in Englewood http://www.wbez.org/sections/food/whole-foods-plans-replicate-detroit-success-englewood-109140 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/flickr_whole foods_SchuminWeb.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Englewood and Detroit have a lot in common.</p><p dir="ltr">They are both shorthand for black and urban areas, but they also both include middle-class homeowners and a gritty vibrancy.</p><p dir="ltr">Still, they seemed unlikely candidates for the yuppie favorite Whole Foods Market, given high rates of food insecurity, unemployment and poverty.</p><p dir="ltr">Defying expectations, Whole Foods is the first national grocer to open in Detroit &mdash; a city of 700,000 &mdash; in years. The market is in Midtown, a bustling area near Wayne State University and a medical district, but nearby firebombed homes wither on urban prairie.</p><p dir="ltr">At the end of a recent business day, the Detroit Whole Foods parking lot is packed. Inside, customers of all ages and racial backgrounds stroll the aisles.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;One thing that I like that the Whole Foods decor team did was really listen to the community about how they wanted the store to feel aesthetically,&quot; &nbsp;said Store Manager Larry Austin. &quot;They wanted to make sure it felt like Detroit.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">The 21,000-square-foot store teems with Detroit touches &mdash;&nbsp;vintage Motown records dangle from cash registers and cafe tables are made of car scraps. The store hosts classes on vegan nutrition and disc jockeys spin techno music.</p><p dir="ltr">&quot;The people here are prideful,&quot; said Austin. &quot;They want you to be real and they have expectations.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">As the chain prepares to open a store at 63rd and Halsted, Englewood residents, movers and shakers can look to the Detroit store as an exmple of what to expect.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">For example, before ground even broke on the Detroit location, residents expressed concern about jobs and transparency. In response, Whole Foods partnered with local nonprofits to hold information sessions on the hiring procecss. Today, 65 percent of the employees are native Detroiters.</p><p dir="ltr">Jobs weren&rsquo;t the only concern. Pricing was, too. Austin says the company listened.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;If you come to Whole Foods Market and you buy artisan cheeses and artisan olive oil, then yeah, your grocery bill is going go climb,&quot; Austin said. &quot;But if you come and shop staples, you shop our groceries, you shop produce [...] you&rsquo;ll see we got bagged apples right now for $2.99 a bag.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Bus driver Eva Turner lives in Detroit and didn&rsquo;t frequent Whole Foods until this store opened. She loads her cart with pita bread, snap peas, apples, chicken gizzards and hummus.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;You can find some good bargains,&quot; she said. &quot;For instance, they had the chicken thighs for $1.29 a pound, which is a good deal &#39;cause if you go to a regular store, that&rsquo;s what you&rsquo;re going to pay but it&rsquo;s kind of fresher here.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">The Detroit Whole Foods offers about 150 local products, from granola to alkaline water.</p><p dir="ltr">Nailah Ellis owns the Detriot company Ellis Island Tropical Tea. She says her&nbsp;bold-red hibiscus tea&nbsp;is a family recipe passed down from her great-grandfather, who was the master chef for Marcus Garvey&rsquo;s Black Star Line.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">&quot;I&rsquo;m getting ready to also open a production facility in Detroit and once I get that open I&rsquo;ll start creating more flavors and I&rsquo;ll be able to produce more and take on more accounts,&quot; she said. &quot;Whole Foods regional is looking at putting me in the Whole Foods Midwest region.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">One of the players instrumental in gaining community credibility is holistic expert and Detroit native Versandra Kennebrew. Whole Foods offered free space to holistic providers, Kennebrew was one of them, and they hired her to conduct community outreach.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The grand opening day of Whole Foods Market was a day in history for the company, said Kennebrew. &quot;They sold more produce in one day on the grand opening day than than any store that opened in the history of Whole Foods Market.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">Whole Foods officials won&rsquo;t release store sales but they say the Detroit location has exceeded expectations. &nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr">Like Englewood, the city&rsquo;s reputation elicited sourness when Whole Foods announced its plans.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;People outside view our community [...] think oh you come here I&rsquo;m going to get mugged,&quot; said Carolyn Miller of Ser Metro Detroit, one of the agencies that helped Whole Foods recruit local employees.&nbsp;&quot;[They say] we&rsquo;re just despair. We&rsquo;re not. We have people who want to eat organic food.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">Khalilah Gaston runs a community development corporation in a neighborhood just north of the Detroit Whole Foods&nbsp;that aims to fight a history of disinvestment. She says Whole Foods has become a model for other projects coming to the neighborhood. The expectation of giving back is higher.</p><p dir="ltr">Still, Whole Foods is not without its critics.</p><p dir="ltr">Urban farmer Greg Willerer is one of them. He owns a city farm dubbed Brother Nature several miles away from the new Whole Foods, one of many new urban farms in the area that provide fresh food to residents.</p><p dir="ltr">He gives Whole Foods props for its strategic campaign, but he questions the $4.2 million in tax incentives the company received from the city.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;There&rsquo;s this climate that Whole Foods is coming into where a lot of public money is being given to major corporations and all of these amazing black-owned businesses and other businesses in the city don&rsquo;t get that kind of help,&quot; Willerer said. &quot;Yet we call that development when a corporation comes in and puts up this brilliantly flashy sexy-looking store.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">Still, the age old adage retail attracts retail remains. A month after Whole Foods opened, the national chain Meijer cut the ribbon on its first Detroit store.</p><p><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" rel="author">Natalie Moore</a> is a WBEZ reporter.&nbsp;</em><em>Follow her on <a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" rel="me">Google+</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore">Twitter</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 13 Nov 2013 08:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/sections/food/whole-foods-plans-replicate-detroit-success-englewood-109140