WBEZ | Ghana http://www.wbez.org/tags/ghana Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en What a Difference a Drug Makes in the Fight Against River Blindness http://www.wbez.org/news/what-difference-drug-makes-fight-against-river-blindness-114569 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/river1.jpg" alt="" /><p><div id="res462954066" previewtitle="Bondi Sanbark, the chief in Beposo 2, says his village used to be full of blind men led around by boys — but that began to change when a new drug was distributed."><div id="res462953406" previewtitle="Albert Tamanja Bidim, a community volunteer, distributes ivermectin, the tablet that fights river blindness, in the Ghanaian town of Beposo 2."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Albert Tamanja Bidim, a community volunteer, distributes ivermectin, the tablet that fights river blindness, in the Ghanaian town of Beposo 2." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/13/img_1748-43_custom-62ef3265dba7463a42e611db754f65f519b9c4dc-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 412px; width: 620px;" title="Albert Tamanja Bidim, a community volunteer, distributes ivermectin, the tablet that fights river blindness, in the Ghanaian town of Beposo 2. (Jason Beaubien/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>One of the problems with river blindness is that it doesn&#39;t kill you.</p></div></div></div><p>It&#39;s a nasty disease that causes agonizing itching, disfigured skin and, in the worst cases, blindness. River blindness is a parasitic infection transmitted by black flies that breed in rapidly flowing bodies of water. The worms burrow under your skin and eventually wiggle across your pupils, destroying your vision. But because the disease usually isn&#39;t fatal, health officials in cash-strapped tropical countries have slotted it lower on their to-do lists than malaria, TB, cholera, AIDS and other life-threatening diseases.</p><p>Indeed, the World Health Organization categorizes river blindness, also known as onchocerciasis, as a &quot;neglected tropical disease.&quot;</p><p>But over the past three decades, much of the world has made steady progress against the debilitating condition. And much of the credit for that progress is linked to ministries of health introducing the drug&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/meds/a607069.html">ivermectin</a>. Mass distributions of ivermectin tablets have sent onchocerciasis rates plummeting.</p><p>The village of Beposo 2 in central Ghana is one of those places.</p><p>Local chief Bondi Sanbark says his village used to be full of blind men being led around by young boys. But that started changing after Ghana changed its strategy in the battle against the disease in the late 1980s. Up to that point, Ghana had been using insecticides to try to kill the black flies that carry the river blindness parasite. The new strategy goes after the parasites inside people. The government treats entire villages, every year, with a drug called ivermectin that kills the offspring of the parasites, which cause the blindness and also can infect others.</p><div id="res462954066" previewtitle="Bondi Sanbark, the chief in Beposo 2, says his village used to be full of blind men led around by boys — but that began to change when a new drug was distributed."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="Bondi Sanbark, the chief in Beposo 2, says his village used to be full of blind men led around by boys — but that began to change when a new drug was distributed." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/13/img_1715-42_custom-21695f01d73c4d40969227d769b6f8e18aa8f08c-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 350px; width: 620px;" title="Bondi Sanbark, the chief in Beposo 2, says his village used to be full of blind men led around by boys — but that began to change when a new drug was distributed. (Jason Beaubien/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>The mass ivermectin campaigns are now treating roughly 4 million Ghanaians a year, or more than 15 percent of the population. And the strategy is paying off.</p></div></div></div><p>No one has gone blind in Beposo 2 for years, says Sanbark.</p><p>Beposo 2 was founded around the time of Ghana&#39;s independence from Britain in 1957. The town is a half-hour&#39;s drive from the Pru River, where the black flies that carry the river blindness parasite swarm. Its founders wanted to get away from the river and from onchocerciasis. But they couldn&#39;t escape the reach of the flies.</p><div id="res462966651"><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>The situation was better here away from the river, but people got sick with what they refer to as &quot;oncho.&quot; Since the introduction of ivermectin, onchocerciasis infections still occur in Beposo 2, but now they&#39;re much milder than in the past. The disease has been sharply curtailed in many parts of Africa and is on the verge of elimination from the Americas.</p><p>But even ivermectin isn&#39;t perfect.</p><p>Ivermectin doesn&#39;t actually kill the roundworm parasites that cause onchocerciasis. The drug is only able to kill the offspring of the parasites, the baby larvae. It&#39;s the spreading of hundreds of thousands of these immature worms through a person&#39;s body that causes the disease. Unfortunately, the parasite can live in a person&#39;s body for up to 15 years. So to suppress the spread of the parasites, entire villages have to be treated with ivermectin year after year in logistically complicated campaigns.</p><p>The distribution campaigns require armies of volunteers.</p><div id="res462953523" previewtitle="A volunteer shows the four ivermectin tablets he's about to give a woman for her yearly dose."><div data-crop-type=""><img alt="A volunteer shows the four ivermectin tablets he's about to give a woman for her yearly dose." src="http://media.npr.org/assets/img/2016/01/13/img_1687-41_custom-3d31964802147025d00764351dc1a927727869a2-s800-c85.jpg" style="height: 474px; width: 620px;" title="A volunteer shows the four ivermectin tablets he's about to give a woman for her yearly dose. (Jason Beaubien/NPR)" /></div><div><div><p>&quot;This job is&nbsp;soooo&nbsp;difficult,&quot; says Albert Tamanja Bidim, the drug distribution volunteer in Beposo 2. Once a year he has to track down every resident of the village and give them the proper number of ivermectin tablets. He carries a long stick, a white bottle of pills and a handwritten ledger with all the villagers&#39; names in it. The markings on the stick indicate how many pills a person should get. Bidim holds it up next to a boy to determine what dosage to give him. Kids under 90 centimeters, roughly 3 feet tall, and pregnant women don&#39;t get any out of safety concerns. The dose varies from one to four tablets, washed down at once, for taller kids and adults.</p></div></div></div><p>Bidim doesn&#39;t get paid for this work but takes the job very seriously.</p><p>&quot;If the person is not here, and I know how many tablets the person will take, I will keep it for him,&quot; Bidim says. &quot;Sometimes, maybe if he has traveled or went to the farm, I&#39;ll keep the tablets until he gets back.&quot;</p><p>This process of volunteers pounding on doors and passing out ivermectin happens all across Ghana in villages prone to river blindness.</p><p>&quot;We have about 5 million Ghanaians at risk of onchocerciasis,&quot; says Dr. Nana-Kwadwo Biritwum, who heads the neglected tropical disease program in the Ghana Ministry of Health.</p><p>He says the annual distribution campaigns are a major undertaking. &quot;We go in with millions of tablets, every year, to treat every community.&quot;</p><p>Many of the villages hardest hit by river blindness are in remote, inaccessible parts. &quot;It takes a lot of work, a lot of resources,&quot; Biritwum says.</p><p>Onchocerciasis is less neglected than some other neglected tropical diseases in that a major pharmaceutical company has made it its cause celebre.</p><p>For decades, Merck has made an unlimited amount of ivermectin available for free under the brand name Mectizan. International aid groups including the World Bank,<a href="http://www.sightsaversusa.org/">Sightsavers</a>&nbsp;and the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cartercenter.org/health/river_blindness/index.html">Carter Center</a>&nbsp;have helped fund the distributions.</p><p>Ghana is seeing the results. Some villages have gone from having 70 to 80 percent of adults testing positive for onchocerciasis 25 years ago to just 2 to 3 percent today.</p><p>Ghana is now talking about trying to wipe out the disease by 2020. Biritwum at the ministry of health says before the arrival of ivermectin, that never would have been possible.</p><p>Ivermectin&#39;s incredible impact on river blindness and other roundworm infections also caught the eye of the Nobel committee. The 2015 prize for medicine went to William Campbell of the U.S. and Satoshi Omura from Japan for discovering the drug (a third honoree did work on malaria). The Nobel committee said, &quot;This year&#39;s Nobel Laureates have developed therapies that have revolutionized the treatment of some of the most devastating parasitic diseases.&quot; And the impact of their work can be clearly seen in villages like Beposo 2 in Ghana.</p><h3><em>Join Us For A Twitter Chat On River Blindness</em></h3><p><em>Want to know more about river blindness? Dr. Neeraj Mistry, the managing director of the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases,&nbsp;<a href="http://bit.ly/1PtfeEd">will be taking your questions on Twitter</a>&nbsp;on Friday, Jan. 22, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET. Leave your questions in a comment below, or tweet them to&nbsp;<a href="http://twitter.com/nprgoatsandsoda">@NPRGoatsandSoda</a>&nbsp;with the hashtag #RiverBlindness.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 22 Jan 2016 10:59:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/news/what-difference-drug-makes-fight-against-river-blindness-114569 Censorship looms amid rise of Hindu nationalism in India http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-22/censorship-looms-amid-rise-hindu-nationalism-india-113473 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/3291759617_b85d5263f9_z.jpg" title="(Photo: Flickr/Pratham Books) " /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229615702&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">India&#39;s writers face censorship</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">In the last few weeks, at least 40 Indian writers have returned top literary prizes in protest of what they call a &ldquo;climate of intolerance&rdquo;. Novelists, poets and playwrights say that since the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) party came to power with the election of Prime Minister Modi, the country has seen a rise in Hindu nationalism that has led to less freedom of speech and respect for secular rights. Writer Sonia Faleiro, and Wendy Doniger, whose book on Hindus was withdrawn from publication in India, join us to discuss the current climate in India.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-0ae63cb2-9106-e9e3-0b3e-a38dd7d7ad56">Wendy Doniger</span> is professor of the history of religions at the <a href="http://twitter.com/uchicago">University of Chicago</a>. </em></li><li><em><a href="http://twitter.com/@soniafaleiro">Sonia Faleiro</a> is a writer and author, most recently of<a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/0802170927/ref=tsm_1_fb_lk">&nbsp;&#39;Beautiful Thing: Inside the Secret World of Bombay&#39;s Dance Bars</a>&#39;.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229616164&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Is an &#39;energy war&#39; still possible?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">Low energy prices can have enormous geopolitical ramifications. Low oil prices played a large role in Canadian voter dissatisfaction and the eventual election defeat of former Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. Russia&rsquo;s economy has been in tailspin from lower gas prices. Many experts feel it&rsquo;s why President Vladimir Putin became aggressive towards his neighbors, especially Ukraine. Low oil prices may have also been a big factor in bringing Iran to the table for the recently agreed on P5 +1 nuclear deal. We&rsquo;ll talk about some of the security issues surrounding energy with Michael Klare, professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and defense correspondent for The Nation. He&rsquo;s written numerous books on international energy and security affairs, most recently, &#39;The Race for What&#39;s Left: The Global Scramble for the World&#39;s Last Resources&#39;.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<span id="docs-internal-guid-0ae63cb2-9109-a272-53d8-eed9270e4e0e"><a href="http://twitter.com/mklare">Michael Klare</a> is professor of peace and world security studies at Hampshire College and defense correspondent at </span><a href="http://twitter.com/thenation">The Nation</a>. His most recent book is, &#39;The Race for What&#39;s Left: The Global Scramble for the World&#39;s Last Resources&#39; .&nbsp;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229616854&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: &#39;Right To Be Free&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr">After hearing Ghanaian Eric Peasah&rsquo;s story about his efforts to buyback child slaves who have been trafficked into Ghana&rsquo;s fishing industry, Chicagoan and Global Activist Lori Dillon, created a local branch of Peasah&rsquo;s NGO, Right To Be Free. For Global Activism, Dillon is back with Peasah, who now regularly visits Chicago to spread awareness and educate schoolchildren about enslaved children in Ghana.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guests:</strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-0ae63cb2-910b-d93a-bb3a-52dbe5af9ca8">Eric Peasah is the founder of <a href="http://twitter.com/rightobefree">Right To Be Free</a> (Ghana).</span></em></li><li><em>Lori Dillon is the founder of <a href="http://twitter.com/rightobefree">Right To Be Free</a> (U.S.).&nbsp;</em></li></ul><div>&nbsp;</div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 22 Oct 2015 14:22:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-10-22/censorship-looms-amid-rise-hindu-nationalism-india-113473 Global Activism: 'Right To Be Free' saves Ghana's children from slavery http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-right-be-free-saves-ghanas-children-slavery-113472 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA-Righttobefree 3.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-b70e5222-90c6-c2b3-20d5-335ececf6cf4">After hearing Ghanaian Eric Peasah&rsquo;s story about his efforts to rescue child slaves who have been trafficked into Ghana&rsquo;s fishing industry, Chicagoan and Global Activist <a href="http://righttobefree.org/">Lori Dillon</a>, created a local branch of <a href="http://www.rightobefree.org/">Peasah&rsquo;s NGO</a>, Right To Be Free. For Global Activism, Dillon is back with Peasah, who now regularly visits Chicago to spread awareness and educate schoolchildren about enslaved children in Ghana.</span></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/229616854&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p></p> Thu, 22 Oct 2015 09:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-right-be-free-saves-ghanas-children-slavery-113472 Global Activism: 'A Better Life for Kids' and 'Aiding Children Together' http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-09-17/global-activism-better-life-kids-and-aiding-children-together-112971 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/abetterlifeforkids.jpg" title="(Photo courtesy of A Better Life for Kids)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224334373&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Activism: &#39;A Better Life for Kids&#39; and &#39;Aiding Children Together&#39;</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>We catch up with global activists, Shelley Nizynski Reese and Jen Ciok. They&rsquo;re both former Skokie, IL school teachers. At least twice a year, Shelley travels to Ghana to teach orphans. Shelley&rsquo;s group &#39;A Better Life for Kids&#39; and Jen&rsquo;s group, &#39;Aiding Children Together&#39; (ACT) have been partnering to help children in Ghana get food, medicine, and education. For our Global Activism segment, Shelley and Jen will tell us about their new programs like, &lsquo;Eggs for Kids&rsquo;, to give protein and hope to Ghanaian schoolchildren. They&rsquo;ll also talk about how a listener heard them on <em>Worldview</em> and wrote a song <a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/mccrackenmiddleschoolkid">(&ldquo;Shine a Light&rdquo;)</a> to support their work.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-87b2bba9-dcee-7424-8503-236e3c71dca8">Shelley Nizynski Reese is founder of &#39;<a href="http://www.abetterlifeforkids.org">A Better Life for Kids&#39;</a></span>, Jennifer Ciok&nbsp;is founder of <a href="http://twitter.com/ACTforEducation">Aiding Children Together (ACT).</a></em></p><div><strong>EVENT:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/golf-for-ghanas-orphans-2015-tickets-17608210632">Golf for Ghana&#39;s Orphans 2015</a></strong></div><div><p>Thursday, September 24, 2015 11:30AM-5:00PM</p><p>Bloomingdale Golf Club</p><p>181 Glen Ellyn Rd, Bloomingdale, IL</p></div></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224335232&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Algeria&#39;s political shakeup</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Algeria&rsquo;s long serving head of intelligence, Mohamed Mediene, was ousted from his post this week. He was often referred to as &#39;the Lord of Algeria, &#39; because of the power and influence he wielded during the 25 years he held the post. We&rsquo;ll take a look at what&rsquo;s behind the power shift and what it could mean with William Lawrence, director of Middle East and North Africa programs at the Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-87b2bba9-dced-79c6-66a4-b2f40db9146b">William Lawrence</span> is the director of Middle East and North Africa programs at the Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224335923&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">World Music Festival: TAL National</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>TAL National is a band from Niamey, the capital of Niger. Their music combines Saharan and West African sounds with upbeat guitars. They&rsquo;re performing as part of this year&rsquo;s World Music Festival in Chicago. In light of their performance, we revisit their last performance at WBEZ.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>TAL National are a band from Niger.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 Sep 2015 14:58:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-09-17/global-activism-better-life-kids-and-aiding-children-together-112971 Global Activism: 'A Better Life for Kids' in Ghana http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-better-life-kids-ghana-112972 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/ga-better life.jpg" alt="" /><p><div class="image-insert-image "><p style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 22px;">We catch up with global activists, Shelley Nizynski Reese and Jen Ciok. At least twice a year, Shelley travels to Ghana to teach orphans. Shelley&rsquo;s group,&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-87b2bba9-dcee-7424-8503-236e3c71dca8"><a href="http://www.abetterlifeforkids.org">A Better Life for Kids</a>,&nbsp;</span></em>and Jen&rsquo;s group,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://twitter.com/ACTforEducation">Aiding Children Together (ACT)</a>,</em>&nbsp;have been partnering to help children in Ghana get food, medicine, and education. For our Global Activism segment, Shelley and Jen will tell us about their new programs like, &lsquo;Eggs for Kids&rsquo;, to give protein and hope to Ghanaian schoolchildren. They&rsquo;ll also talk about how a listener heard them on&nbsp;<em>Worldview</em>&nbsp;and wrote a song&nbsp;<a href="http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/mccrackenmiddleschoolkid">(&ldquo;Shine a Light&rdquo;)</a>&nbsp;to support their work.</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/224334373&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="942px"></iframe></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><div><strong>EVENT:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/golf-for-ghanas-orphans-2015-tickets-17608210632">Golf for Ghana&#39;s Orphans 2015</a></strong></div><div><p>Thursday, September 24, 2015 11:30AM-5:00PM</p><p>Bloomingdale Golf Club</p><p>181 Glen Ellyn Rd, Bloomingdale, IL</p></div></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Thu, 17 Sep 2015 09:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-better-life-kids-ghana-112972 Parents bond over closing of a Chicago public school http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/parents-bond-over-closing-chicago-public-school-112075 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/StoryCorps 150521 Jeanette Angela bh.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In 2013, Chicago Public Schools closed fifty schools as part of a restructuring. When Angela Ross found out her kids&rsquo; elementary school was closing, she could hardly believe it. Then Jeanette Ramann and other parents from a nearby Bronzeville school came to help with the transition. Today, Ross and Ramann are friends and fellow education advocates.</p><p><em>StoryCorps&rsquo; mission is to provide Americans of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to share, record and preserve their stories. These excerpts, edited by WBEZ, present some of our favorites from the current visit, as well as from previous trips.</em></p><p><em>This story was recorded as part of a collaboration between StoryCorps Chicago and <a href="http://schoolprojectfilm.com">The School Project</a> </em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 22 May 2015 09:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/storycorps/parents-bond-over-closing-chicago-public-school-112075 Global Activism: 'Right To Be Free' helps enslaved children in Ghana http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-right-be-free-helps-enslaved-children-ghana-110952 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Ga-Rigght to be free.jpg" alt="" /><p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-c3432a21-19bd-c013-080f-fe7081a2dc3d">We met Lori Dillon last February about her story to create a local branch of the NGO, <a href="http://righttobefree.org/">Right To Be Free</a>. She did it to support her friend, Ghanaian <a href="http://www.rightobefree.org/">Eric Peasah</a> &ldquo;who has dedicated his life to the rescue and rehabilitation of <a href="http://righttobefree.org/senyos-story.html">trafficked children</a>.&rdquo; For </span><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism"><em>Global Activism</em></a>, Lori is back, with Eric, who came from Ghana to spread awareness about slavery and indentured servitude of children in his country.</p></p> Thu, 16 Oct 2014 08:57:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-right-be-free-helps-enslaved-children-ghana-110952 USA advances to knockout round in World Cup http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-27/usa-advances-knockout-round-world-cup-110426 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP123136072982.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>As we enter the knockout stage of the World Cup, our panel of soccer experts join us to make their calls for the rest of the cup.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-usa-advances-to-knockout-round-in-world/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-usa-advances-to-knockout-round-in-world.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-usa-advances-to-knockout-round-in-world" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: USA advances to knockout round in World Cup" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Fri, 27 Jun 2014 11:35:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-27/usa-advances-knockout-round-world-cup-110426 Global Activism: 'Right to be Free' rescuing trafficked children in Ghana http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-right-be-free-rescuing-trafficked-children-ghana-109651 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/GA Right to be Free 2.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Lori Dillon created <a href="http://righttobefree.org/">Right To Be Free</a> to support her friend, Eric Peasah &ldquo;who has dedicated his life to the rescue and rehabilitation of trafficked children.&rdquo; Lori shares her journey with us for <em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism">Global Activism</a></em>.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/133423038&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_artwork=true" width="100%"></iframe>Lori talks about what motivated her toward this cause:</p><p style="margin-left:1.0in;">&ldquo;I feel so honored to support <a href="http://www.rightobefree.org/">Eric Peasah</a>, who works tirelessly on behalf of these child laborers. I have witnessed how effective his program is and how he is truly transforming the lives of these children and their families. It is a passion of mine to advocate on behalf of these children who have lost their childhoods and dreams of ever being rescued. Feeling compassion is not enough, we must also act. The eradication of human trafficking is one of the paramount challenges of our time and I feel a deep responsibility to share what I know to help raise awareness. To let others know they can have a real impact on these children. They can be part of a growing effort to combat human trafficking and the real progress that is being made. It&#39;s also inspiring to work with students and see how they put their compassion into action once they learn about the plight of these children. It&#39;s exciting to see them connect and engage with the children they helped rescue. I know it&#39;s something they&#39;ll remember and be proud of for the rest of their lives.&rdquo;</p></p> Thu, 06 Feb 2014 09:46:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-right-be-free-rescuing-trafficked-children-ghana-109651 Snowden in Russia, solidarity with Guantanamo and helping children in Ghana http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-18/snowden-russia-solidarity-guantanamo-and-helping-children-ghana-108100 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP398694333112.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>We talk with a lawyer representing Guantanamo detainees about his decision to participate in the ongoing hunger strike for a week. Writer Julia Ioffe joins Worldview to talk about how the Russians have handled the Edward Snowden case. Two local teachers take their passion for education to Ghana.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F101620302&amp;color=ff6600&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-snowden-in-russia-solidarity-with-guanta.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-snowden-in-russia-solidarity-with-guanta" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Snowden in Russia, solidarity with Guantanamo and helping children in Ghana " on Storify</a>]</noscript></p></p> Thu, 18 Jul 2013 10:49:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2013-07-18/snowden-russia-solidarity-guantanamo-and-helping-children-ghana-108100