WBEZ | soccer http://www.wbez.org/tags/soccer Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Turkey's role in the conflict with ISIS http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-07/turkeys-role-conflict-isis-110906 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP146696076907.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The battle for control of the Syrian border town of Kobani continues. Despite U.S. airstrikes, ISIS has been advancing. Turkey&rsquo;s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has called for more support for the rebels. We&#39;ll take a look at Turkey&#39;s role in the conflict with Henri Barkley of Lehigh University.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-oct-7/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-oct-7.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-oct-7" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Turkey's role in the conflict with ISIS" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 07 Oct 2014 11:23:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-10-07/turkeys-role-conflict-isis-110906 U.S. Soccer fans look toward the future of the sport http://www.wbez.org/news/us-soccer-fans-look-toward-future-sport-110351 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/USA1_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>In Chicago&rsquo;s Logan Square neighborhood, a group of twenty-somethings is playing soccer on artificial turf made slippery by a gentle falling rain. &nbsp;It&rsquo;s just after 9 p.m. as the group takes a break and talks about the U.S. team. The conversation isn&rsquo;t about who&rsquo;s in the starting lineup. It&rsquo;s more about who&rsquo;s not on this year&rsquo;s U.S. World Cup team: star forward Landon Donovan.</p><p>The future of U.S. soccer is a popular talking point. Nine of the roster&rsquo;s 23 players are 25 or younger. Everyone&rsquo;s eyes are on the team&rsquo;s coach, former German striker Jurgen Klinsmann. Depending on how the U.S. performs, he&rsquo;ll either be criticized for cutting the most popular U.S. soccer star or hailed for a genius move.</p><p>At Small Bar on Division, U.S. fans gathered to watch their team play Azerbaijan in a friendly pre World Cup game. Here&rsquo;s where you&rsquo;ll find the Chicago chapter of the American Outlaws. It&rsquo;s</p><p>the biggest booster club for the U.S team, boasting 18,000 members around the country. Super fan Kevin Harris is disappointed Donovan won&rsquo;t be on the team, but says that move won&rsquo;t be a big part of the Klinsmann&rsquo;s legacy.</p><p>&ldquo;He was brought in to help with the youth program, academies, things like that,&rdquo; says Harris. &ldquo;So we have this funnel of young players that are coming in that can then take over and join a squad.&rdquo;</p><p>Major League Baseball has the minors to get new talent. The NFL and NBA get young prospects from colleges. That kind of set up doesn&rsquo;t exist for soccer. Klinsmann wants to develop a system to build &nbsp;stronger learning centers, so-called academies, to improve soccer training.</p><p>Ultimately, Klinsmann wants to create an academy system to create the next team for the World Cup.</p><p>A few would-be soccer stars gather under the hot sun at Toyota Park to watch the Chicago Fire practice. The group of 10 and 11 year olds traveled from New Orleans. They&rsquo;re part of the Fire&rsquo;s youth development league. The Fire has 10 clubs in 7 states. This team, the Louisiana Fire, is not only watching how the MLS players do their thing. The kids are getting a workout of their own, getting drilled by academy coaches. After a sweaty scrimmage, the boy surround Fire players like Victor Pineda.</p><p>&ldquo;I can relate. I still have signed balls and shirts at home,&rdquo; says Pineda as he signs autographs for kids who turn quiet and shy around the Fire player. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s awesome. Something you&rsquo;ll remember forever.&rdquo;</p><p>Pineda is from Chicago and he&rsquo;s one of the Fire&rsquo;s homegrown academy players. &nbsp;He&rsquo;s a 21 year old midfielder with the Fire, but he hasn&rsquo;t seen much playing time yet. Years ago, he tried out for the under 17 World Cup but was cut from the final squad.</p><p>&ldquo;When you don&#39;t&rsquo; make a team like that I think it makes you work harder and want it even more,&rdquo; he says.</p><p>With players his age in the World Cup, reaching the pinnacle of the sport, Pineda says being with the Fire is great because he gets to live out the same dreams kids from Louisiana, Chicago &nbsp;and around the globe hope to experience one day.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been playing since I was five. So I don&rsquo;t have a reason to give up now. So I think I just want to keep working.&rdquo;</p><p><em>Follow WBEZ Host/Producer Yolanda Perdomo on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">@yolandanews</a><u>&nbsp;and</u>&nbsp;<a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/106564114685277342468/posts/p/pub">Google+</a></em></p><p style="margin-left:.5in;">&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 16 Jun 2014 11:28:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/us-soccer-fans-look-toward-future-sport-110351 Why does sexual assault happen in public spaces in Egypt? http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-16/why-does-sexual-assault-happen-public-spaces-egypt-110350 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP449379976098.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Last week Egyptian president Abdel Fattah El Sisi visited the hospital room of a woman who was assaulted in Cairo&#39;s Tahrir square during an election celebration. We&#39;ll talk to an Egyptian sociologist about why such public sexual assaults are on the rise in Egypt.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-19/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-19.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-19" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Why does sexual assault happen in public spaces in Egypt?" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 16 Jun 2014 10:52:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-16/why-does-sexual-assault-happen-public-spaces-egypt-110350 Chicago’s German community welcomes World Cup watchers http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago%E2%80%99s-german-community-welcomes-world-cup-watchers-110336 <p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/GERMANY5-horiz.jpg" style="height: 373px; width: 280px; float: left; margin: 5px;" title="Dank Haus member Erwin Lickmann stands by the cultural center’s prized painting of Kaiser Wilhelm I, Germany’s first leader (WBEZ/Yolanda Perdomo)" />At Lincoln Park&rsquo;s Dank Haus, Erwin Lickmann &nbsp;and I slowly walk into a crimson walled room. He whispers as he shows me a giant 19th century portrait of Germany&rsquo;s first leader, Kaiser Wilhelm I. Lickman is dressed in pea green lederhosen and he tells me the Dank is more than a refuge for older Germans who want to engage in their culture</p><p>&ldquo;The Dank Haus is a community of serving people,&rdquo; he says &ldquo;Sports brings people together. And they can have a beer afterwards and be happy, you know. Builds friendships!&rdquo;</p><p>The Dank Haus was founded in 1959 as a haven for Germans, a place where they could celebrate their heritage and their culture. Next week, it&rsquo;ll welcome hundreds who&rsquo;ll pack the place to watch the World Cup. On this day, around two dozen senior citizens listen to Dank member Sara Hartig read a German poem. Many of them, like Gerhard Grieff, came after World War II.</p><p>&ldquo;I emigrated from Germany in 1952 because Germany after the war was bad,&rdquo; says Greiff. &ldquo;Living over there, we didn&rsquo;t have much of a future there when I was young. So I came over here and stayed here.&rdquo;</p><p>It wasn&rsquo;t easy here either, being German in America after the war. That made places like the Dank Haus all the more important for German Americans. &nbsp;Over the years the community assimilated. Sarah Hartig has been with the Dank for decades and wonders about its future. None of her six children are involved in the cultural center.</p><p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s going to be more American. English is spoken at all the meetings,&rdquo; says Hartig. &ldquo;When we started everything was spoken in German. We&rsquo;re getting older, young people came in and they started speaking English.&rdquo;</p><p>I asked how she felt about that. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m going along&rdquo; she sighs.</p><p>Today, German traditions are alive and well, celebrated by Germans and non-Germans alike. There are two main festivals in Chicago each year: Oktoberfest in the fall and Maifest in late spring. This year in addition to the traditional German songs and suds, talk at the festival turned to the World Cup.</p><p>Anna Liese and Rafael Vasquez have a bit of a problem as the games approach. She&rsquo;s German and he&rsquo;s Mexican. Anna Liese was raised with a strong sense of German pride. She&rsquo;s dressed in a dirndl costume, speaks German and Spanish. She met her husband more than 40 years ago in Mexico.</p><p>&ldquo;Of course my father was a little upset. But after many years, he was at peace with it,&rdquo; Liese says.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/GERMANY2.jpg" style="height: 210px; width: 280px; float: left; border-width: 0px; border-style: solid; margin: 5px;" title="Ana Leise and Rafael Vasquez have a laugh at Maifest in Lincoln Square, May 30. (WBEZ/Yolanda Perdomo)" />Her husband Rafael, dressed in lederhosen, passes around shots of apfelkorn better known as apple schnapps.</p><p>&ldquo;She cooks Mexican food. She liked soccer, she drinks beer. What else could I want?,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;I won the lottery!&rdquo;</p><p>Vasquez says you don&rsquo;t have to belong to one nationality to enjoy what another one can bring. But he&rsquo;s not planning to root for Germany in the World Cup. He&rsquo;s supporting his home country.</p><p>&ldquo;Oh my god, you&rsquo;re putting me on the spot.&rdquo; says Vasquez &ldquo; Mexico. Hopefully they will make it to the semifinals. I want to say there&rsquo;s a 10 percent chance they will make it past the quarterfinals.&rdquo;</p><p>If Mexico doesn&rsquo;t make it, he may want to latch himself to his wife&rsquo;s team, Germany, which is favored to go much farther in the tournament.</p><p><em>Follow WBEZ Host/Producer Yolanda Perdomo on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">@yolandanews</a><u>&nbsp;</u>and <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/106564114685277342468/posts/p/pub">Google+</a></em></p></p> Thu, 12 Jun 2014 14:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/chicago%E2%80%99s-german-community-welcomes-world-cup-watchers-110336 Some Mexicans in Chicago not sure about their team's World Cup chances http://www.wbez.org/news/some-mexicans-chicago-not-sure-about-their-teams-world-cup-chances-110319 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/Mexico1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Soccer is tough. But those who play it, love it. At a soccer field in Pilsen, a few dozen teens from Cristo Rey High School are sweating it out during a muggy practice session. The artificial turf also doubles as a baseball field.</p><p>The teens switch squads and talk about European soccer during gatorade breaks. I ask four Mexican American teenagers who they&rsquo;re rooting for during the World Cup.</p><p>&ldquo;Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina,&rdquo; the high schoolers say. These are second generation Mexicans who think the national team is on the losing end of the World Cup stick. 14-year-old Analysette Peña predicts Brazil. With an asterisk.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m from Mexico so would I like to see them win? But we gotta face it,&rdquo; says Peña. &ldquo;There are other teams that put more effort than them and try not to make mistakes. So I&rsquo;m going to root for the ones that actually deserve to win.&rdquo;</p><p>These kids are not alone. Earlier this month at Soldier Field, the team showed why it may not make it far in the World Cup. Mexico disappointed its fans again, losing to Bosnia 1-0.</p><p>Herrasamo Sanchez is from Kenosha, Wisconsin. Like the other tens of thousands of Mexican fans at the game, he&rsquo;s cheering for Mexico, but loyal to a certain point.</p><p>&ldquo;Obviously I&rsquo;m going to support my nation. But Brazil is going to take the World Cup,&quot; says Sanchez. &ldquo;They&rsquo;re going to win it.&rdquo;</p><p>Mexico&rsquo;s lackluster performance is being blamed on everything from multiple coaching changes in recent months to the loss of star midfielder Luis Montes Jimenez to an injury. Mexico&rsquo;s poor play is impacting fans and sports vendors in the Chicago area.</p><p>In Melrose Park, the store La Cancha sport is preparing to close for the night. The co-owner says they&rsquo;ve only sold only one Mexican national jersey all day. Jose Martinez came from Hammond, Indiana, to get shirts for a neighborhood league. Looking down as he speaks, he makes no attempt to hide his disappointment. Both as a Mexican national and as a businessman who lost money trying to sell Mexican shirts at the Soldier Field game.</p><p>&ldquo;When they do well, people buy. When they don&rsquo;t play well, they don&rsquo;t sell,&quot; says Martinez. &ldquo;Of course it hurts. They should be playing better.&rdquo;</p><p>That&rsquo;s when Carolina Reyes interrupts him. She drove from DuPage County to buy little league uniforms.</p><p>&ldquo;When the team is losing, everyone&rsquo;s a critic. But when they&rsquo;re winning, everyone loves them,&rdquo; says Reyes. &quot;Win or lose, I&rsquo;m Mexican and I&rsquo;m rooting for Mexico!&rdquo;</p><p>That&rsquo;s when Martinez looks up and confesses: He plans to root for Mexico.</p><p><em>Follow WBEZ Host/Producer Yolanda Perdomo on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/yolandanews">@yolandanews</a>&nbsp;and <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/0/106564114685277342468/posts/p/pub">Google+</a></em></p></p> Wed, 11 Jun 2014 09:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/some-mexicans-chicago-not-sure-about-their-teams-world-cup-chances-110319 The World Cup http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-10/world-cup-110312 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/main-images/AP579771902424_0.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The FIFA World Cup 2014 starts this Thursday in Brazil. Our panel of soccer experts tell us who they think the winners, and losers, will be.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-world-cup/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-world-cup.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-the-world-cup" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: The World Cup" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 10 Jun 2014 10:40:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-06-10/world-cup-110312 Retiring as a soccer mom http://www.wbez.org/blogs/cheryl-raye-stout/2013-03/retiring-soccer-mom-106038 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Jaxon%20Soccer.jpg" style="float: right; height: 388px; width: 300px;" title="When a kid hangs up the cleats, a soccer mom retires. (Photo/Glenn Stout)" />It&#39;s over. After years of sweating or freezing watching a multitude of games in various sports, my career as a sports (mostly soccer) mom is over. I&rsquo;m being forced into retirement, no longer sitting on wonderful bleacher seats to watch the only player who mattered to me: my son.</div><p>As a sports reporter, I&#39;ve seen thousands of professional games. You analyze and question all the different nuances of the game as&nbsp;you&nbsp;watch. You go to practices, pre-game warm-ups, stay through the game and then go the post-game to get players and coach&rsquo;s reactions. You are not a fan during that time.</p><p>This is not a complaint, but a matter-of-fact element of the job. You absorb, question and process the sport.</p><p>When you are a mom, it is simpler but more emotional. And at the younger ages, it&#39;s very pure.&nbsp; We let our son try a variety of sports: baseball, basketball, tennis, volleyball, golf and soccer. He did reach his black belt level in taekwondo, a shared accomplishment with his dad. Soccer was a mainstay for my son and the sport my husband played in high school and college.</p><p>For the star athlete, sports may be their best way of racking up accomplishments and satisfaction. That wasn&rsquo;t the case for our son. He took the route of doing it for fun and to be part of the team. No travel for any sport.</p><p>He is not a gifted athlete. He was born later then the kids in his grade, so size and physical maturity didn&#39;t measure up to his teammates. He did possess the ability to be coached and was a terrific teammate. We stressed that he focus on playing defense, since&nbsp;that would be appreciated in&nbsp;any sport.</p><p>Too bad his freshman soccer coach insisted he play forward instead of defense. It wasn&#39;t a fit, but he never complained. He just decided just to play recreational soccer instead.&nbsp;</p><p>Now nearing his sixteenth birthday and having other interests, my son will be hanging up his cleats for good. Scratch that. He NEVER hung up anything.</p><p>That is something as a mom I will not miss at all. Shoes, gloves, dirty uniforms and empty water bottles never seem to make it to the right place. Add these to the list: Washing mud off shoes, trying to get grass stains off a uniform and buying shoes last minute because of a growth spurt.</p><p>There are several things I will miss.&nbsp;</p><p>Gratefully, my husband is a camera buff so the most magical sports moments have been caught. Like as a 5-year-old when he ran to first base with the biggest smile and just sat down once he got there.</p><p>One indoor soccer season as a goalie, my son was nearly flawless and only giving up a few scores. His second year of golf at age 10, he played a nine-hole public course and got a hole-in-one. He had no clue what that meant.</p><p>Coming off the bench in a volleyball tournament in eighth grade he led a win in a deciding match and was picked up by his teammates in celebration. After that day he would be a starter.</p><p>Watching him use his hands to break several boards to earn his black belt, I was just I relieved he wasn&#39;t hurt.</p><p>There were plenty of times he would be on the bench, but he liked to talk with his teammates. He never disrespected a coach or an official.</p><p>Here is some unsolicited advice to young parents. Enjoy the moment, don&rsquo;t push and make sure the kids are having fun. Chances of becoming a professional are really, really slim. If they do have phenomenal talent, let a coach tell you. You need to have perspective when you analyze your child&#39;s ability. Don&#39;t live through your son or daughter.</p><p>Last weekend it felt sad leaving the soccer venue for Jaxon&#39;s last game. But he played hard and had a smile when he was done. I didn&#39;t realize until that moment I was retiring from a great job: soccer mom.</p><p><em>Follow Cheryl on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestout">@CRayeStout</a> and Facebook <a href="http://www.facebook.com/CherylAtTheGame">Cheryl Raye Stout #AtTheGame</a> </em></p></p> Wed, 13 Mar 2013 06:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/cheryl-raye-stout/2013-03/retiring-soccer-mom-106038 The Rosie Schaap Interview http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey/2012-12/rosie-schaap-interview-104518 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Rosie.jpg" style="float: right; height: 200px; width: 300px;" title="Photo by M. Sharkey" />After all the Christmas posts this week, I know you expected me to interview a snowperson (why always a man? Or a woman? Snow gender need not be so definitive!) but instead today I&rsquo;m chatting with someone who will (I hope) not melt away. Cheerful spirits are a key part of the holiday season, so today I&rsquo;m interviewing the author of the upcoming memoir <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Drinking-Men-Memoir-Rosie-Schaap/dp/1594487111">Drinking With Men</a>, </em>a love letter to the bars, pubs, and taverns. She is also contributor to <em>This American Life</em> and npr.org, and writes the monthly <a href="http://query.nytimes.com/search/sitesearch/#/Schaap%2C+Rosie/since1851/allresults/1/allauthors/newest/">&quot;Drink&quot; column for The New York Times Magazine.</a> You can learn a lot more about her <a href="http://rosieschaap.com/">here</a>.</div><br /><p><strong>Drinking and writing: do they go together? </strong><br />For some, perhaps, but not for me. A glass of wine to calm my poor nerves and loosen me up a little is fine, but that&rsquo;s about all I can manage and still get work done. I tend to keep the writing and the drinking separate. Conveniently, my best writing hours are between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m., so there&rsquo;s no conflict with my best drinking hours.</p><p><strong>What&rsquo;s your favorite thing to eat while you drink? I&rsquo;m not talking about wine/food pairings, I mean happy hour snacks.</strong><br />Pretzels. Macadamia nuts. Charcuterie of many kinds. <a href="http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/alain-ducasses-gougeres">Gougères</a>, if I&rsquo;m drinking at the sort of place that has them, which seldom happens. And Cheez Doodles&mdash;that very, very distant cousin of gougères &mdash;are delicious with beer.</p><p><strong>When you travel, do you investigate good drinking establishments ahead of time (and if so, what are your resources) or do you prefer to wing it?</strong><br />Mostly I wing it, and follow leads from locals and my own instincts. I&rsquo;d never heard of Else&rsquo;s, a terrific neighborhood bar, before I visited Montreal in 2006 or so. I just happened upon it when I was walking to a restaurant and fell in bar-love at first sight. In Belfast a few years ago, I got into a conversation with an off-duty constable at a bar across the street from my hotel. When I told her I was a writer, she said, &ldquo;Oh, well then you have to go to the <a href="http://www.thejohnhewitt.com/">John Hewitt</a>.&rdquo; She and her friends walked me over there, and it remains one of my favorite pubs in Belfast&mdash;a city with no shortage of great places to drink.</p><p><strong>Where would you like to drink in Chicago? </strong><br />Anywhere lively and local, with a good mix of regulars who like to talk to strangers. Wherever you want to take me. I trust you, Claire.</p><p><strong>Babies in bars. Your thoughts. </strong><br />As long as they&rsquo;re snugly strapped to a parent&mdash;and the sort of parent who will remove them from the bar the second they start crying&mdash;I think babies in bars are fine. Once they start getting really squirmy and learning how to walk, all bets are off. A neighborhood friend&mdash;an English expat&mdash;used to take his daughter to our local soccer bar so he could have a pint or two (no more than that) and watch a match. She was the best bar baby ever, until she started toddling. There are just too many sharp edges, drunk people&rsquo;s feet, tall barstools, and loud noises in a bar for a mobile baby to be safe and comfortable&mdash;and not annoying to grown ups.</p><p><strong>I am starting a new job in January and haven&rsquo;t had time to properly celebrate yet. What would you toast to a new beginning like that with (taking into consideration the time of year).</strong><br />First, congratulations! Assuming you&rsquo;ll have a bit of Champagne on New Year&rsquo;s Eve, I believe the martini&mdash;made with gin, not too dry&mdash; is the drink for new beginnings (even though I&rsquo;m usually a brown liquor girl in the winter). Better yet if that martini is accompanied by a pile of oysters.</p><p><strong>What&rsquo;s a drink that everyone else seems to adore (either of the moment or a classic) that you just can&rsquo;t get into? </strong><br />The current craze for <em><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaro_%28liqueur%29">amari</a></em> &ndash;a family of bitter Italian digestifs&mdash;in cocktail-making has gone too far. I like many amari just fine, but when deployed with too heavy a hand or too little thought, they make for drinks that taste suspiciously like cough syrup, but without the expectorating benefits.</p><p>Oh, and <a href="http://cocktails.about.com/od/whiskeyrecipes/a/pickleback_cocktail.htm">pickle-backs</a>. Has Chicago been stricken by this scourge yet? [<em>Editor&rsquo;s note: not that I am aware of, but if I am wrong, please let me know where pickle-backs are happening in the city</em>.] I like whiskey. And I like pickles. I like bars. And I like delicatessens. But pickle juice makes a bar smell like a deli, which just isn&rsquo;t right.</p><p><strong>What&rsquo;s your advice to women who like to have a drink alone in a bar but who aren&rsquo;t looking to be picked up on how to be polite to &#39;friendly&#39; men?</strong><br />If a woman can claim a barstool in a corner, that&rsquo;s the first step; that way, she limits access because she can&rsquo;t be surrounded on both sides. Beyond that: absorbing reading material helps (and an actual book or newspaper is more effective than an iPhone or eReader as a PLEASE STAY AWAY FROM ME signifier). If a &ldquo;friendly&rdquo; man is too persistently friendly, I find that saying something like, &ldquo;Nice meeting you. But I&rsquo;ve had a long day and need to spend a little quiet time with my book and my drink&rdquo; usually works fine.</p><p><strong>What&rsquo;s your favorite film version of <em>The Secret Garden</em>? (Mine is <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Secret-Garden-Hallmark-Hall-Fame/dp/B0000639G3">the Hallmark movie classics one with Derek Jacobi</a>.)</strong><br />Nothing can come close to the splendor of the book. But I&rsquo;ll have to go with <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSQKt1klbrQ">Agnieszka Holland&rsquo;s 1993 adaptation</a>, mostly because I think John Lynch is such a brilliant and underappreciated actor. Still, even he is no match for the Archibald Craven I&rsquo;ve imagined since I first read the book more than 30 years ago, and no one can ever approach the Dickon of my dreams, who really is the perfect person.</p><p><strong>Which soccer teams have the best uniforms?</strong><br />KNVB&mdash;the Dutch National Football Team&mdash;obviously. <a href="http://shinguardian.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/johan.jpg?w=225&amp;h=300">ORANJE</a>! Although the font they used on their kit during EuroCup was <a href="http://speakingchic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/dutch-uniform-euro-2012_thumb.jpg">weird and sort of space-age</a>. Alas, that was the least of their problems during that tournament. But anyway: ORANJE!</p><p><strong>If you could pick just one person to have a drink with right this very second, who would it be and why? </strong><br />In <em>Drinking With Men,</em> I devote one chapter to the late, much-missed <a href="http://nymag.com/listings/bar/liquor_store_bar/">Liquor Store bar in TriBeCa</a>. It was my favorite New York bar, and there, I met the finest drinking companion of all time&mdash;a brilliant, funny, soulful artist who was also a great listener and true friend. He is no longer with us either. What I wouldn&rsquo;t give to be able to meet up with him at Liquor Store for a few more rounds.</p><p><strong>How does it feel to be the 335th person interviewed for Zulkey.com/WBEZ?</strong><br />Seriously? <em>I </em>am #335?! That is huge; a gratifying rebuke to everyone who said I&rsquo;d never do anything of value.</p></p> Fri, 21 Dec 2012 08:55:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/claire-zulkey/2012-12/rosie-schaap-interview-104518 Serving up a feast of Chicago sports: "May I ask you for a moment of silence…for last week's game?" http://www.wbez.org/blogs/cheryl-raye-stout/2012-11/serving-feast-chicago-sports-may-i-ask-you-moment-silence%E2%80%A6for-last <p><p>There has been a smorgasbord of sports news on and off the playing field/court, some more appetizing than others. Here are some of the morsels:</p><p><strong>First an appetizer:</strong></p><p>- My quote of the week came on Wednesday from the Bears media sessions at the practice facility. No, it wasn&#39;t Jay Cutler, Brandon Marshall opened up his session, &quot;May I ask you for a moment of silence&hellip;for last week&#39;s game?&quot; Yes, we will put that game to rest--permanently. (Unless they play like that again.)</p><p><strong>Main course:</strong></p><p>- No Rose-no problem for the Bulls Opener; it was just one game and it was Sacramento. It was rough watching the opening video of the team just before the intros and seeing flashes of Rose, a painful reminder to the fans and his teammates.</p><p>Off the court, the team and Taj Gibson did get a deal done just before the 11pm deadline on Halloween. Gibson signed a four year deal worth $38 million. As Gibson was talking about it in the locker room, his teammates were yelling at him that the big contract meant he was buying dinner.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/rsz_1taj_gibson_charles_rex_arbogast.jpg" style="float: right; height: 393px; width: 300px; " title="Taj Gibson got a win and a new contract Opening Night. (AP/Charles Rex Arbogast)" />- Wednesday night was also a MLS playoff night for the Chicago Fire, they fell 2-1 to Will Bruin and the Houston Dynamo. Bruin tallied both goals. And I was thinking about covering their next game&hellip;next year.</p><p>- White Sox General Manager Rick Hahn (strange to have a new GM) is already making noise, and it seems to be directed at the Detroit Tigers and the AL Central division-they are going to compete with them next year. By re-signing Jake Peavy to a two year and an option for the $29 million plus and picking up Gavin Floyd&#39;s $9.5 million, this team has secure their starting rotation. They also have good news on pitcher John Danks; the lefty is throwing weeks after his surgery. Not at all surprised the Sox didn&rsquo;t pick up the options on third baseman Kevin Youkilis and reliever Brett Myers. That was $23 million that would have bloated the payroll. Unless they find difficulties with free agency...it was nice knowing you.</p><p>That brings me to the one free agent that filed and will be testing the market: A.J. Pierzynski. In all likelihood, the Sox catcher is gone. He <em>will </em>be getting some decent contract offers. If A.J. leaves there will be only one player left from the World Series team: Paul Konerko.&nbsp;</p><p>- Kudos to Peavy and Cubs second baseman Darwin Barney, both won the Rawlings Gold Glove for their defense. We were used to Mark Buehrle winning that honor for the Southsiders. Buehrle did win it in the National League. The real story is Barney, it has been a long time for a Cub second baseman to earn that honor; Ryne Sandberg was a fixture for it.</p><p>I spoke with Darwin from his home in Oregon. He said Sandberg helped him when Ryne was his minor league manager. One of the few bright spots for the Cubs this dreadful season was the 141 errorless games streak by Barney. He told me it wasn&#39;t hard physically, but tough mentally. &ldquo;There were times when it was tough, it was on your mind all the time,&quot; said Barney. It was also treated like a no-hitter; no one wanted to jinx it so it was not talked about. Darwin said it was &ldquo;uplifting&rdquo; during a tough season. Maybe now the Cubs management will consider him a core player.</p><p>- Anyone interested in seeing Patrick Kane play hockey in Switzerland?&nbsp; You don&rsquo;t think the Blackhawk brain trust is squirming a little bit with this development?&nbsp; There will be more players leaving as the NHL lockout continues. The league is now making rumblings of cancelling the &ldquo;Winter Classic&rdquo; between Detroit and Toronto, scheduled January 1<sup>st</sup> at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. That is over one-hundred thousand seats to refund and big network dollars lost.</p><p>- Rack up another Bears honor: Cornerback Charles Tillman was named Defensive Player of the Month. He is having an incredible season.</p><p><strong>Dessert:</strong></p><p>- And finally some college football: love them or hate them, an undefeated 8-0 Notre Dame team-third in the BCS rankings and a competitive 7-2 Northwestern team is always good for Chicago. While the Wildcats take the week off, The Irish are hosting Pittsburgh. Have you ever watched head coach Brian Kelly on the sidelines or hear one of his press conferences? He is as wound up as you ever want to see in a coach. Obviously, Kelly is getting his message across and making ND very relevant for a shot at the National Championship. If you are a sports fan and love to see cool venues, I highly recommend a trip to South Bend. Seeing an Irish home game is really a terrific experience--even if you don&rsquo;t like Notre Dame.</p><p><em>Follow Cheryl on Twitter <a href="https://twitter.com/Crayestou">@CRayeStout</a>&nbsp;and on&nbsp;Facebook: Cheryl Raye Stout <a href="http://www.facebook.com/CherylAtTheGame?fref=ts">#AtTheGame</a></em></p></p> Fri, 02 Nov 2012 06:00:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/cheryl-raye-stout/2012-11/serving-feast-chicago-sports-may-i-ask-you-moment-silence%E2%80%A6for-last Euro 2012: Germans positioned to wallop Italy — and stay on top http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-06/euro-2012-germans-positioned-wallop-italy-%E2%80%94-and-stay-top-100421 <p><p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/Euro%202012-Germnay.jpg" title="Germany’s Philipp Lahm, center, makes a move against Greece during the Euro 2012 quarterfinal match last Friday. (AP/Frank Augstein)" /></p><p>Can Italy beat Germany?</p><p>No.&nbsp;Well, that was easy. End of blog post.</p><p>But seriously, Germany will win the second semifinal game of the European soccer championships, thus beating Italy for the first time ever in a major tournament. (West) Germany lost the 1970 and 2006 World Cup semis to Italy in two of the best games of those tournaments. With two extra rest days, and the England v. Italy game going to extra time and penalties, the Germans will be fresher, quicker to the ball, more aggressive and, player-for-player, better than Italy.</p><p>Germany even had the luxury of resting Gomez and Podolski against Greece, and their replacements, Klose and Reus, both scored. Reus looked impressive and Klose led the line as he has done for Germany for much of the past decade. Ozil looked fantastic in the quarterfinal match (yet again)&nbsp;and, even if Bastian Schweinsteiger is injured as some reports say, Germany&rsquo;s strength in depth is remarkable. Players like Goetze, the highly rated and in-demand midfielder&nbsp;Borussia Dortmund, have hardly been featured so far.</p><p>If Germany does have a weakness, it&rsquo;s at the back; Italy may be able to exploit this. Boateng looks like he&rsquo;d be prone to an error or two, and in central defense, although Hummels looks solid, Badstuber can be a yard slow at times. I also thought Neuer was slow to react to the cross for Greece&rsquo;s first goal in the quarterfinal &mdash; although it was a great pass, the ball should never have been allowed to travel so far across the box.</p><p>Despite all this, I just can&rsquo;t see Italy winning. This is a strong German team and I think they&rsquo;ll go all the way, and not just in 2012. I saw on a website that their starting 11 versus Denmark, with an average age of just over 25, was their youngest ever at a European championships. Germany could be on top for years to come.</p><p>Now the caveat: Mario Balotelli. For all Pirlo&rsquo;s artistry and De Rossi&rsquo;s energy, if Italy can win, Balotelli will make the difference. So far in this tournament, he&rsquo;s been relatively controlled, both on and off the field. Against England, Balotelli just couldn&rsquo;t quite connect, but he got into positions where he could make chances. He&rsquo;s a cool finisher usually, and perhaps he may just give Italy a spark (the <a href="http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2011/oct/22/mario-balotelli-house-fire-fireworks">fireworks</a>?!) to force a surprise. But Italy have only scored one goal from open play in the tournament (vs. Spain) and four over all &mdash; two of those coming from corners against a hapless Ireland. They are heavily reliant on Pirlo (now 33 years old) to dictate play and just had an energy-sapping game with England. In the end, I think Germany&rsquo;s youthful midfield will win the day.</p></p> Tue, 26 Jun 2012 10:54:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/blogs/bez/2012-06/euro-2012-germans-positioned-wallop-italy-%E2%80%94-and-stay-top-100421