WBEZ | Mexico http://www.wbez.org/tags/mexico Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Southwest Side braces for loss of Oreos, and 600 jobs http://www.wbez.org/series/front-center/southwest-side-braces-loss-oreos-and-600-jobs-112739 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Oreos_resize1.jpg" alt="" /><p><p dir="ltr">Growing up in the 1950s, Jim Capraro remembers the sweet aroma of cookies that wafted through homes on the Southwest Side, one of the perks of living near the giant Nabisco plant at 73rd and Kedzie.</p><p dir="ltr">Capraro says he used to tease relatives who lived several miles away.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;My cousins who lived in the Back of the Yards lived next to the stockyards and we used to say our smells are better than your smells,&rdquo; he said.</p><p dir="ltr">Decades later Capraro got to visit the factory &mdash; then the biggest bakery in the world &mdash; and witnessed a Willy Wonka-like operation.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The top floor is a whole floor of these huge mix masters. Each one of them looks like an 18-foot swimming pool,&rdquo; Capraro said. &ldquo;The flour and sugar and chocolate all goes to the top floor and then the dough is put on conveyor belts and it&rsquo;s actually gravity that brings them down to the second floor where they&rsquo;re cut into cookie shapes.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">Oreo cookies, one of Nabisco&#39;s most beloved, best-selling brands was baked there. But that will soon change.</p><p dir="ltr">Parent company Mondelez International is shipping the production of the cookie, and 600 jobs, to Mexico instead of upgrading the local facility.</p><p dir="ltr">For years, Oreos and other iconic brands like Chips Ahoy generated huge profits and provided thousands of well-paid union jobs. Many lived in the surrounding neighborhoods of Chicago Lawn, West Lawn and Marquette Park.</p><p dir="ltr">Then, more than 20 years ago parent company RJ Reynolds threatened to move those jobs out of state. By this time, Capraro led the Greater Southwest Development Corporation.</p><p dir="ltr">He remembers getting a call from Valerie Jarrett, Chicago&rsquo;s commissioner of planning and development at the time. Jarrett is now a top adviser to President Barack Obama. Back then she worked with Capraro to keep the plant on the Southwest Side by giving Nabisco $300 million in tax increment financing dollars. The TIF money helped pay for infrastructure improvements.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;I justified in my own mind working to support them. One was that &lsquo;the jobs would stay here,&rsquo; I thought, forever. Turns out I may be very wrong on that,&rdquo; Capraro said.</p><p dir="ltr">This summer Nabisco&rsquo;s current parent company, Deerfield-based Mondelez International announced it was shipping 600 jobs &mdash; half the plant&rsquo;s workforce &mdash; to Mexico.</p><p dir="ltr">That could affect Michael Smith, a utility worker at the plant. He said workers often wore shirts of the snack they baked.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;We proudly wore that shirt because we represented a company that said you produce a product that&rsquo;s televised, that&rsquo;s on the radio and kids and adults alike across the country love,&rdquo; Smith said.</p><p dir="ltr">Fellow worker Sabrina Pope is known as the Oreo queen. She&rsquo;s a processor at Nabisco who earns more than $26 an hour. The 35-year veteran originally had only planned to stay for three.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;The pay was good. I was raising a son at the time and it was the American Dream that I had security there. I had security,&rdquo; Pope said. &ldquo;Right now, I don&rsquo;t even know what my future&rsquo;s going to bring because I&rsquo;m not old enough to retire. I got the years to retire but I just don&rsquo;t have the age to do it.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr">The city said it wanted to work with Mondelez to keep the jobs here and discussed various incentives, but the company never took officials up on it.</p><p dir="ltr">Mondelez officials said its upgraded facility in Salinas, Mexico will open in the middle of next year. The jobs in Chicago will be phased out and Oreos will be made at other U.S. sites. Company officials said the Nabisco plant won&rsquo;t shut down entirely.</p><p dir="ltr">But Jim Capraro worries about the future of an area that already has a higher unemployment rate than the city&rsquo;s average.</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;It was places like Nabisco and the companies around it that gave me hope that we could offer alternatives to the underground economy that exists on the South Side of the city to young people who need to live, who need to work,&rdquo; he said.</p><p dir="ltr">Capraro points to another big plant that used to be on the Southwest Side. More than a decade ago the Kraft-owned Kool-Aid factory closed its doors.</p><p dir="ltr">Hundreds of jobs were lost and never came back.</p><p dir="ltr"><em><a href="http://www.wbez.org/users/nmoore-0" target="_blank">Natalie Moore</a>&nbsp;is WBEZ&rsquo;s South Side Bureau reporter.<a href="mailto:mailto:nmoore@wbez.org">nmoore@wbez.org</a>.&nbsp;You can follow Natalie on&nbsp;<a href="https://plus.google.com//104033432051539426343" target="_blank">Google+</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/natalieymoore" target="_blank">Twitter</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 26 Aug 2015 16:30:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/series/front-center/southwest-side-braces-loss-oreos-and-600-jobs-112739 The Tianjin explosion and China's regulatory practices http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-17/tianjin-explosion-and-chinas-regulatory-practices-112670 <p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219667588&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Is the Tianjin explosion a warning for China?</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Last Wednesday, in Tianjin China, a fire at a warehouse storing volatile chemicals killed at least 56 people and injured several hundred others. This is just the latest in a series of industrial accidents that have happened in the last decade as China has seen rapid industrialization and economic growth. The government has tried to keep tight control over the information regarding the investigation as to what might have caused the fire and whether anyone should be held accountable. Wen Huang, author of &#39;The Little Red Guard and Death in the Lucky Holiday Hotel&#39;, joins us to talk about the large numbers of industrial accidents and what he says are a lack of regulations geared to preventing such tragedies.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c7d1f529-3d23-5600-1005-fd547bd67fdd">Wen Huang is a journalist and author of of the books &#39;</span>The Little Red Guard&#39; and &#39;A Death in the Lucky Holiday Hotel: Murder, Money and an Epic Power Struggle in China&#39;.</em></p><p>&nbsp;</p></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219667949&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Inside &#39;The Jungle&#39;: The Calais refugee crisis</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The refugee camp known as &lsquo;The Jungle&rsquo; is only a few months old, and is already one of the biggest of its kind in Europe. Close to the Port of Calais in France, the camp is the last stop for many seeking asylum in the United Kingdom. Casualties in the camp continue to rise as refugees attempt to cross the border by jumping on&nbsp;buses&nbsp;or trains headed for the Channel Tunnel. Shailja Sharma is an Associate Dean and Associate Professor of International Studies at DePaul University. She joins us to discuss the growing humanitarian crisis in Calais, and how it is shaping the immigration debate in Europe.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c7d1f529-3d26-3cb2-2a44-b5cd3b37b65b">Shailja Sharma </span>is an Associate Dean and Associate Professor of International Studies at DePaul University.</em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/219668914&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">The threat against Mexico&#39;s journalists</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Protesters are in the streets of Mexico City to draw attention to the continuing murders of journalists and human rights activists. In early August, five people, including photojournalist, Rubén Espinosa, and human rights activist, Nadia Vera, were found shot dead in a Mexico City apartment. Vera and three other female victims exhibited evidence of sexual torture. Espinosa and Vera were two of many who&rsquo;ve fled from the southern Mexican state of Veracruz, a place of increased violence and murder against journalists and activists. Espinosa was one of at least 12 murdered Veracruz journalists since 2011. We&rsquo;ll talk about the killings with Laura Carlsen, director of the Americas Program for the Center for International Policy, based in Mexico City. She also hosts the online television program , &ldquo;Interview from Mexico&rdquo;.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-c7d1f529-3d29-18cb-e639-4b6342b5e0e0"><a href="http://twitter.com/cipamericas">Laura Carlsen</a>, director of the Americas Program for the Center for International Policy, based in Mexico City and the host of the online television program, &#39;Interviews from Mexico&#39;.</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 17 Aug 2015 14:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-08-17/tianjin-explosion-and-chinas-regulatory-practices-112670 World powers come to comprehensive nuclear agreement with Iran http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-14/world-powers-come-comprehensive-nuclear-agreement-iran-112388 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/U.S. Embassy Vienna.jpg" title="(Photo; Flickr/U.S. Embassy Vienna)" /><br />&nbsp;</div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214720025&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Breaking down the new Iran deal</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>The United States, China, Russia, France, United Kingdom, Germany and Iran have reached a comprehensive deal to curb Iran&rsquo;s nuclear program in exchange for the easing of international sanctions. The deal still needs approval from the U.S. Congress. President Obama called today&rsquo;s agreement a step toward a &quot;more hopeful world.&quot; We talk about the significance of the deal and the road ahead with a panel of experts.</p><p><strong>Guests:&nbsp;</strong></p><ul><li><em>Trita Parsi is president of the National Iranian American Council. </em></li><li><em>Steve Clemons is the Washington editor-at-large for The Atlantic.</em></li><li><em>David Cortright si the&nbsp;associate director of policy studies at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.&nbsp;</em></li></ul></div><p>&nbsp;</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/214720765&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">What the &#39;El Chapo&#39; escape means for Mexico</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p>Joaquín &#39;El Chapo&#39; Guzmán, king of Mexico&rsquo;s Sinaloa drug cartel, escaped from a maximum security prison outside of Mexico City over the weekend . His escape came despite a guarantee by Mexico&rsquo;s President, Enrique Peña Nieto, that Guzman, who&rsquo;s broken out of prison numerous times, would never escape again on his watch. We&rsquo;ll talk about the jailbreak with Laura Carlsen, director of the Americas Program for the Center for International Policy, based in Mexico City. She also hosts an online television program called, &ldquo;Interview from Mexico&rdquo;. Carlsen will tell us why she believes complicity by the Mexican government, and neglect by the U.S. government, were responsible for Guzman&rsquo;s escape.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong>&nbsp;<em><span id="docs-internal-guid-022dec3f-8e16-6499-4a1d-8e5ecbf4c718">Laura Carlsen is the director of the Americas Program for the Center for International Policy.</span></em></p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Tue, 14 Jul 2015 14:25:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-07-14/world-powers-come-comprehensive-nuclear-agreement-iran-112388 To pay her tuition, undocumented student enters beauty pageant http://www.wbez.org/news/pay-her-tuition-undocumented-student-enters-beauty-pageant-112219 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/SenoritaFiestaDelSolContestants.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children have made gains in recent years. Many are now eligible for work papers and driver&rsquo;s licenses. But when it comes to paying for college, they still face big barriers.</p><p>In Illinois, undocumented students are ineligible for financial aid from either the state or federal government. To get their degrees, they have to get creative. Zulybeidi Maldonado, 22, of Arlington Heights, is trying to pay for her next semester by competing in a Chicago beauty pageant whose prize is $1,500 for college.</p><p>&ldquo;I just need the scholarship to go back to school,&rdquo; said Maldonado, who was born in the Mexican state of Guerrero. &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t do it without a scholarship.&rdquo;</p><p>But María Bucio, an expert on financial aid for undocumented students, has big questions for anyone who thinks a pageant might be the way to pay for an education. &ldquo;How much effort are you putting into this initiative and how much are you going to get out of it?&rdquo; she asked.</p><p>Our story (above) follows Maldonado through months of preparation for the pageant. It turns out she&rsquo;s hoping to get more from the contest than a college scholarship.</p></p> Fri, 19 Jun 2015 08:33:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/pay-her-tuition-undocumented-student-enters-beauty-pageant-112219 Worldview: "David and Goliath:" ProDESC's battle for the marginalized communities of Mexico http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-07/worldview-david-and-goliath-prodescs-battle-marginalized-communities <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP219992024277.jpg" style="height: 413px; width: 620px;" title="Drawings of some of 43 missing students are surrounded by flower petals, formimg the shape of a heart, during a protest marking the six-month anniversary of their disappearance, in Mexico City, Thursday, March 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199721000&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Mexican lawyer advocates for human rights and social justice</span></p><div>The Mexican human rights organization ProDESC works to protect the rights of Mexico&rsquo;s marginalized communities.&nbsp; It was founded by Mexican lawyer Alejandra Ancheita, whose father was also human rights activist who died under suspicious circumstances when she was just eight years old. Ancheita joins us to discuss her work and the state of human rights in Mexico.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Guest:</strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-7a227eed-9585-cc68-dda3-11aa7d50063c">Alejandra Ancheita is the founder and executive director of the Mexico-city based <a href="https://twitter.com/ProDESC">ProDESC</a> (the Project of Economic, Cultural and Social Rights).</span></em></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/199721287&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">First NBA player of Indian descent&nbsp;</span></p><p>Born to immigrant parents in Canada, Sim Bhullar has become the first player of Indian descent to be signed to an NBA contract. Despite measuring 7&rsquo;5&rdquo;, he&rsquo;s not yet made an impact on the court. However, Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive, an Indian businessman, sees this opportunity to make history as a positive to an otherwise gloomy season.&nbsp;<em>Grantland</em>&nbsp;contributor, Jordan Ritter Conn, joins us to discuss the cultural impact Bhullar&rsquo;s signing might have and where the game of basketball can go from here.</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-369bfd80-958d-cf11-2604-37684749250d"><a href="https://twitter.com/jordanconn">Jordan Ritter Conn</a> is a contributor for <a href="https://twitter.com/Grantland33">Grantland</a> and author of the book </span></em><a href="https://magazine.atavist.com/stories/the-defender/">The Defender: Manute Bol&rsquo;s Journey from Sudan to the NBA and Back Again.</a></p></p> Tue, 07 Apr 2015 15:12:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-07/worldview-david-and-goliath-prodescs-battle-marginalized-communities Worldview: Negotiations with Iran continue to stall http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-01/worldview-negotiations-iran-continue-stall-111804 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/AP869056451626.jpg" style="height: 430px; width: 620px;" title="Head of Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, center, walks after an extended round of talks on Iran's nuclear program at the Beau Rivage Palace Hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland, Wednesday April 1, 2015.(AP Photo/Brendan Smialowski, Pool)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198787792&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Iran talks in limbo</span></p><p><span id="docs-internal-guid-1d59b81a-7678-b81e-4bd7-4f3d95cf1356">Initial reports of the six major powers coming to a tentative agreement with Iran on its nuclear program &nbsp;now describe the current state of events with words like &ldquo;chaos, disunity and cacophony.&quot; Though the parties are reportedly &ldquo;close&rdquo; to paving the way for future talks, movement has stalled on details such as the lifting sanctions on Iran. Joe Cirincione is a proliferation expert and president of the Ploughshares Fund. He&rsquo;ll tell us what he thinks is happening behind the scenes and what the chances are for success.</span></p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong></p><p dir="ltr"><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-1d59b81a-7679-13b8-41f6-d4ac647c0d08"><a href="https://twitter.com/Cirincione">Joe Cirincione</a> is the </span>president of the <a href="https://twitter.com/plough_shares">Ploughshares Fund</a>.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198787933&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Nigeria elects non-ruling party for first time in history</span></p><p>For the first time in Nigeria&rsquo;s history, a sitting president has been defeated. Muhammadu Buhari won the election and defeated incumbent Goodluck Jonathan by about two million votes. Buhari said his victory was proof that Nigeria has embraced democracy.&nbsp; Nigeria has a long history of military rule, coups and election fraud.&nbsp; We&rsquo;ll discuss the results of the vote with Clement Adibe, professor of political science at DePaul University.</p><p><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong></p><p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-cf48e13f-767b-a60f-a8b3-b4f0e88d89b4">Clement Adibe is a professor of political science at <a href="https://twitter.com/DePaulU">DePaul University.</a></span></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198788256&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Food Wednesday: Eastern Orthodox Lent and Chinese foods for the dead</span></p><p>It&rsquo;s a big week in international food news and religious customs. Even though Lent ends this week for many, Eastern Orthodox Lent still has more than a week to go. This Saturday is also the customary day for Chinese to visit their dead relatives and bring them ceremonial food. Finally, a Sri Lankan undergrad made a groundbreaking discovery about rice last week that is taking the food world by storm. WBEZ food contributor Louisa Chu and WBEZ producer Monica Eng fill us in on the details.</p><p><strong>Guests:</strong></p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/louisachu">Louisa Chu</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/monicaeng">Monica Eng</a> are the hosts of the <a href="http://www.wbez.org/content/chewing-fat-podcast-louisa-chu-and-monica-eng">Chewing the Fat</a> podcast.</em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/198788826&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">Global Notes:&nbsp;</span><span style="color: rgb(41, 47, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 26px; letter-spacing: 0.259999990463257px; line-height: 32px; white-space: pre-wrap; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">Toña </span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; background-color: rgb(255, 244, 244);">La Negra, the Queen of Mexican boleros</span></p><p>She was known as the &lsquo;&#39;queen of the Mexican bolero, but the artistry of María Antonia del Carmen Peregrino is almost entirely forgotten. This week on&nbsp;<em>Global Notes</em>,&nbsp;<em>Morning Shift</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Radio M</em>&nbsp;host Tony Sarabia brings us the music of the Veracruz Mexico native known as &quot;Toña le Negra.&quot;</p><p><strong>Guest:</strong></p><p><em><a href="https://twitter.com/wbezsarabia">Tony Sarabia</a> is the host of <a href="https://twitter.com/WBEZmorning">WBEZ Morning Shift</a>.</em></p></p> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 14:24:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-04-01/worldview-negotiations-iran-continue-stall-111804 Woldview: Immigrant remittance making an impact in rural Mexico http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-24/woldview-immigrant-remittance-making-impact-rural-mexico-111761 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/casamichoacan.jpg" style="height: 533px; width: 620px;" title="Casa Michoacan in Pilsen is often visited by Mexicans planing their remittance projects. (Google Earth)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197498424&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><font color="#333333" face="Arial, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px;">The effect of remittance on rural Mexico</span></font></p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-9d619428-4d84-d1c5-39f2-16c40970292e">In 2012 Mexico received an estimated 22 billion dollars in remittances.&nbsp;</span><span id="docs-internal-guid-9d619428-4d84-d1c5-39f2-16c40970292e">Those remittance dollars, which have been flowing for decades from Mexicans living in the United States have altered just about every aspect of &nbsp;life in rural mexico. They&rsquo;ve changed the way new homes get built, paid for public works and infrastructure projects. At times, hey&rsquo;ve also changed the way life runs the village and altered the power structures and sometimes created divisions and envy that did not exist before those remittance dollars flowed in. Sarah Lynn Lopez explores those changes in her book </span><em>The Remittance Landscape Spaces of Migration in Rural Mexico and Urban USA</em>.</p><p dir="ltr"><b>Guest:&nbsp;</b><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-9d619428-4d85-dcb8-6de2-db89f9e9180c">Sarah Lynn Lopez is the author of </span><a href="http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/R/bo17090075.html">The Remittance Landscape Spaces of Migration in Rural Mexico and Urban USA.</a></em></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197498706&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe><span style="font-size: 23.9999980926514px; line-height: 22px; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">The dying languages of the world</span></p><p dir="ltr">There is a chance that as many as 50 percent of the world&rsquo;s languages will disappear by the end of this century.&nbsp; The data is imperfect but by some estimates, we lose a language about every four months. The internet and globalization are part of the reason that languages are dying out. At times political activism and legislation have helped to rescue a language on the brink. New Yorker staff writer Judith Thurman examines efforts to save&nbsp; dying languages in&nbsp; her piece &quot;A Loss for Words,&quot; which appears in this week&rsquo;s edition of the New Yorker. She joins us to talk about some of the efforts.&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Guest:&nbsp;</strong><em><a href="http://www.newyorker.com/contributors/judith-thurman">Judith Thurman</a> is a staff writer at the&nbsp;New Yorker and author of &nbsp;&quot;A Loss for Words.&quot;</em></p></p> Tue, 24 Mar 2015 15:10:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2015-03-24/woldview-immigrant-remittance-making-impact-rural-mexico-111761 Taliban attack school in Pakistan http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-12-16/taliban-attack-school-pakistan-111238 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP964797281715.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The Pakistani Taliban have attacked a military school, killing at least 130 people, most of them children. Aqil Shah, an expert on the Pakistani military, joins us to discuss the attack.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-taliban-attack-in-pakistan/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-taliban-attack-in-pakistan.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-taliban-attack-in-pakistan" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Taliban attack school in Pakistan" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Tue, 16 Dec 2014 11:15:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-12-16/taliban-attack-school-pakistan-111238 International Human Rights Day http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-12-10/international-human-rights-day-111216 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/project_story.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>To mark International Human Rights Day, we&#39;ll take a look at global race relations, conditions for farm workers in Mexico and musicians under threat for the political messages in their music.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-could-ferguson-happen-abroad/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-could-ferguson-happen-abroad.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-could-ferguson-happen-abroad" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: International Human Rights Day" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 10 Dec 2014 11:23:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-12-10/international-human-rights-day-111216 Anger grows over corruption in Mexico http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-26/anger-grows-over-corruption-mexico-111162 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/AP443647597511.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>The disappearance of 43 students in Mexico has led to mass protests in the country. We&#39;ll hear a special report from the BBC and we&#39;ll take listen to the music that is fueling the movement.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-29/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-29.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/worldview-29" target="_blank">View the story "Worldview: Anger grows over corruption in Mexico" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:11:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/worldview/2014-11-26/anger-grows-over-corruption-mexico-111162