WBEZ | cardinal george http://www.wbez.org/tags/cardinal-george Latest from WBEZ Chicago Public Radio en Afternoon Shift: Week in Review http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-04-24/afternoon-shift-week-review-111942 <p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/WBEZ%20Lynette%20Kalsnes.JPG" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="(WBEZ/Lynette Kalsnes)" /></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202400178&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><font color="#333333"><span style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: 24px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Week in Review: Funeral for Cardinal George, Mayor Emanuel&#39;s new Cheif of Staff, and Dante Servin acquittal</span></font></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed03-9cd8-e4a0-bdbab5a0d14e">We wrap up this week&rsquo;s biggest news headlines with </span>TouchVision TV Edit Director, Scott Smith, and Chicago Tribune reporter, Juan Perez. We discuss Mayor Emanuel&rsquo;s choice for chief of staff: CTA President, Forrest Claypool; the week&rsquo;s memorial services for Cardinal Francis George; and, Dante Servin&rsquo;s acquittal in the death of Rekia Boyd. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed03-9cd8-e4a0-bdbab5a0d14e">Guests:</span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/ourmaninchicago">Scott Smith</a> is TouchVision TV&rsquo;s Edit Director.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed03-9cd8-e4a0-bdbab5a0d14e"><a href="https://twitter.com/PerezJr">Juan Perez</a></span> is a Chicago Tribune reporter.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202400578&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Friday Mini Mix featuring DJ Carlos Feliciano</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Every Friday we bring you a brand new mix from the Vocalo DJ Collective, curated by DJ Jesse De La Pena. Today&rsquo;s set comes from DJ Carlos Feliciano and features underground and soulful House music.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed05-9eaa-7b2f-875fb146b5b5">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://soundcloud.com/soulamyte">Carlos Feliciano</a> is a Chicago-based DJ.</em></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202406042&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Wanda Vista Tower&#39;s proposed location causes mixed feelings in Lakeshore East</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed07-111c-08c4-822f8ccc9b75">The prospect of adding a new skyscraper to the city skyline may be exciting but some residents in the area where the proposed Wanda Vista Tower would be built have mixed feelings about how a 93-story building would affect the aesthetics of the neighborhood. </span>Crain&#39;s Chicago Business real estate reporter, Dennis Rodkin, has talked to residents in Chicago&#39;s Lakeshore East and he joins us with more.</p><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed07-111c-08c4-822f8ccc9b75">Guest: </span></strong><em><a href="https://twitter.com/Dennis_Rodkin">Dennis Rodkin</a> is a Crain&rsquo;s Chicago Business reporter.</em></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202406139&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Hubble Space Telescope celebrates 25 years</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed07-111c-08c4-822f8ccc9b75">T</span>wenty-five years ago today, NASA launched the Hubble Space Telescope. And ever since, our understanding of the entire universe has been altered. Michelle Nichols of Adler Planetarium joins us to discuss the legacy of the Hubble Space Telescope.</p><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Michelle Nichols is Master Educator at the <a href="http://www.adlerplanetarium.org/">Adler Planetarium</a>.</em></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202405776&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Tech Shift: Week in Review</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed09-bc96-e7d3-83eb9830c1fa">Some of the week&rsquo;s most popular tech news including: Chicago&rsquo;s tech talent rankings; Google&rsquo;s latest project, </span>Google Fi; plus, a conversation on rural broadband access and why it&rsquo;s important. WBEZ&rsquo;s Director of Digital, Tim Akimoff, and Datascope&rsquo;s Laurie Skelly, join us for this edition of Tech Shift week in review.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed09-bc96-e7d3-83eb9830c1fa">Guests:</span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/timakimoff">Tim Akimoff</a> is WBEZ&rsquo;s Director of Digital.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed09-bc96-e7d3-83eb9830c1fa"><a href="https://twitter.com/laurieskelly">Laurie Skelly</a></span> is Datascope&rsquo;s Data Scientist.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202406236&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Joliet legislators consider law to limit use of puppy mills</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">After more than eighty dogs were rescued from an alleged puppy mill in Kankakee in early April, lawmakers in Joliet are considering a new ordinance that would limit the use of puppy mills in area pet stores. Cari Meyers is the founder of the Puppy Mill Project, which assisted in that raid, and she joins us with details.</p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed0b-cb5c-bd59-8deaf12aa3cd"><strong>Guest:</strong> <em>Cari Meyers is founder of the </em></span><em><a href="http://www.thepuppymillproject.org/the-story-of-the-puppy-mill-project/">The Puppy Mill Project</a>.</em></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202406402&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Major Chicago mental health provider forced to close its doors</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">A large and longstanding provider of mental health care in Chicago has been forced to close its doors. Community Counseling Centers of Chicago &mdash; known as C4 &mdash; started out as a one-room storefront in the early 70&rsquo;s. The goal back then was to help psychiatric patients rebuild their lives after time spent in mental hospitals in Uptown and Edgewater. Since then, the organization expanded across the city, providing clinical services and counseling to more than 10,000 people suffering from mental illness, substance abuse, and more. WBEZ&rsquo;s Shannon Heffernan brings us the latest on the center&rsquo;s closing. We also hear from Josh Evans of the Illinois Association of Rehabilitation Facilities.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed0d-60b0-ae08-bcd8fc64b019">Guests:</span></strong></p><ul dir="ltr"><li><em><a href="https://twitter.com/shannon_h">Shannon Heffernan</a> is a WBEZ reporter.</em></li><li><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed0d-60b0-ae08-bcd8fc64b019">Josh Evans is Vice President of Government Relations at the </span><a href="http://www.iarf.org/AboutUs.aspx">Illinois Association of Rehabilitation Facilities</a>.</em></li></ul></div><p><iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202406475&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false"></iframe></p><p style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><span style="font-size: 24px;">Picture of Illinois State budget cuts starts to take shape</span></p><div style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: 22px; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed12-8e80-c7fc-edc1d325f216">We&rsquo;re getting a better idea of where the State of Illinois budget cuts, intended to fix a $1.6 billion hole, will be going into effect. WBEZ&rsquo;s Tony Arnold joins us with more. And by the way, if you&rsquo;re trying to keep up on the latest with Illinois politics, be sure to see </span><a href="http://interactive.wbez.org/rauner/">The Rauner Play-by-Play</a> on wbez.org.</p><p dir="ltr" style="margin: 0px 0px 18px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e7ed9f0-ed12-8e80-c7fc-edc1d325f216">Guest: </span><a href="https://twitter.com/tonyjarnold">Tony Arnold</a> is a WBEZ reporter.&nbsp;</p></div><p>&nbsp;</p></p> Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:07:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2015-04-24/afternoon-shift-week-review-111942 Portage Park church mourns 'favorite son' Cardinal George http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/portage-park-church-mourns-favorite-son-cardinal-george-111906 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/cardinal francis george as altar boy_picmonkeyed.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Parishioners at Cardinal Francis George&rsquo;s boyhood church are mourning the late Roman Catholic leader.</p><p>George grew up in the Portage Park neighborhood on Chicago&rsquo;s Northwest Side at St. Pascal Church. He went to Catholic school here and was ordained here. He&rsquo;s described on the church website as their &ldquo;Favorite Son.&rdquo;</p><p><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/remembering-chicagos-cardinal-francis-george-111900" target="_blank">George died Friday</a> after a long fight with cancer.</p><p>Photos lining the back of St. Pascal&rsquo;s show George at every stage of his life: as a baby, an altar boy, graduating from school here, and years later, greeting the Pope.</p><p>Parishioners gathered around the photos and shared memories before mass started Sunday.</p><p>&ldquo;No matter where he came to visit, he came back with a smile and hope,&rdquo; Danny Klbecka, a longtime parishioner recalled. &ldquo;He was a great man, and we&rsquo;re sorry he&rsquo;s gone. We&rsquo;re going to miss him, we&rsquo;ll all miss him.&rdquo;</p><p>The cardinal often returned to visit the church and to see childhood friends.</p><p>&ldquo;He was our great success story,&rdquo; said St. Pascal&rsquo;s Pastor Paul Seaman. &ldquo;He was symbolic of what St. Pascal and the Catholic church is all about. He was a man of faith, he was a man of service, he cared about people, and he was very genuine in the life he lived.&rdquo;</p><p>The pastor and parishioners alike described George as a kind man who was devout in his faith, and they offered insight into the longtime spiritual leader.</p><p>In his sermon, Father Seaman said George talked about his bouts with cancer. At one point, the cardinal felt he was sure he was dying. He said he felt cold inside and out. But a nurse held his hand and told him to fight.</p><p>George said he learned the only thing we take into eternity is our relationships. And although his most important relationship was with God, Seaman said, during a meeting with priests the cardinal said he regretted not becoming friends with more of them. He always wanted to be fair and didn&rsquo;t want anyone to feel they were &ldquo;in&rdquo; or &ldquo;out,&rdquo; Seaman said, adding that such an attempt at fairness came at a high personal cost.</p><p>The cardinal had a strict interpretation of church teachings and was often described as rigid or rule-driven by some.</p><p>Rev. Seaman said George believed that if we learned merely from our experience, our range of knowledge would be too narrow. He saw the history and teachings of the church as a broader and wiser teacher.</p><p>Seaman said the point wasn&rsquo;t the rules, but a relationship with God. Without that relationship, the cardinal said, religion was just a set of burdensome rules.</p><p>St. Pascal isn&rsquo;t the only parish remembering the cardinal. Churches across the region said prayers for him over the weekend, and tributes came pouring in from religious and political leaders.</p><p>Muslim and Jewish leaders here offered sympathy. Leaders of the Muslim Community Center said George made arrangements for Muslims to pray within Chicago churches, denounced injustice and collaborated on public policy issues.</p><p>&ldquo;The Muslim Community Center along with the world will miss this truly committed person of interfaith understanding,&rdquo; leaders said in a statement.</p><p>&ldquo;Leaders of the Jewish United Fund of Metropolitan Chicago join with the entire Jewish community in remembering with joy, respect and gratitude the faithful friendship of Cardinal George,&rdquo; a statement said, adding George &ldquo;continued the path of his predecessors, Cardinal Cody and Cardinal Bernardin, in building a relationship built on foundations of mutual respect.&rdquo;</p><p>Meanwhile, Pope Francis sent this telegram from the Vatican:</p><blockquote><p>&ldquo;To the Most Reverend Blase Cupich<br />Archbishop of Chicago</p><p><br />Saddened to learn of the death of Cardinal Francis E. George, Archbishop Emeritus of Chicago, I offer heartfelt condolences to you and to the clergy, religious and lay faithful of the Archdiocese. With gratitude for Cardinal George&rsquo;s witness of consecrated life as an Oblate of Mary Immaculate, his service to the Church&rsquo;s educational apostolate and his years of episcopal ministry in the Churches of Yakima, Portland and Chicago, I join you in commending the soul of this wise and gentle pastor to the merciful love of God our heavenly Father. To all who mourn the late Cardinal in the sure hope of the Resurrection, I cordially impart my Apostolic Blessing as a pledge of consolation and peace in the Lord.&rdquo;</p></blockquote><p>Details: <a href="http://www.archchicago.org/passing-of-francis-cardinal-george/schedule" target="_blank">Funeral services</a> for Cardinal George.</p><p><em>Lynette Kalsnes covers religion for WBEZ. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/lynettekalsnes" target="_blank">@LynetteKalsnes</a>.</em><br />&nbsp;</p></p> Mon, 20 Apr 2015 15:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/portage-park-church-mourns-favorite-son-cardinal-george-111906 Meet Bishop Blase Cupich, Chicago's incoming archbishop http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/meet-bishop-blase-cupich-chicagos-incoming-archbishop-110828 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/greeting.JPG" alt="" /><p><p><em>Updated 5:30 p.m.</em></p><p>Bishop Blase Cupich will be installed as the next archbishop of the Archdiocese of Chicago on Nov. 18. He&rsquo;s currently the bishop of Spokane, Wash., and previously served as bishop of Rapid City, S.D.</p><p>He began a press conference Saturday by asking the people of Chicago to pray for him, as Pope Francis did right after he became pontiff.</p><p>Cupich&rsquo;s appointment came as something of a surprise to many who have been closely watching the succession process. The bishop comes from a smaller diocese, and hadn&rsquo;t been on most of the short lists. But he&rsquo;s known as a moderate who observers expect will follow the pastoral approach of Pope Francis.</p><blockquote><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/cupich-be-next-chicago-archbishop-110827">Observers, parishioners</a></strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/cupich-be-next-chicago-archbishop-110827"><strong>&nbsp;discuss Cardinal George&#39;s legacy</strong></a></blockquote><p>That viewpoint was evident at his first press conference here, where he was informal and used short parables to get his point across. In Spanish, he said he comes as a pastor, but he also comes here as a brother.</p><p><strong>Bishop Cupich&rsquo;s style of leadership</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168607075&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>This is the Pope&rsquo;s first major selection in the U.S., so the appointment has been closely watched as indicative of the direction in which the pontiff may hope to lead the U.S. Roman Catholic church.</p><p>&ldquo;I think the holy father is a pastoral man,&rdquo; Cupich said. &ldquo;...I think that I wouldn&rsquo;t want to in any way overly politicize or put this in a different context. I think he cares a lot about people, and he took his time, and he wanted to provide a pastor. And so I think he sent a pastor, not a message.&rdquo;</p><p>Bishop Cupich said he was humbled and encouraged by the appointment, calling it a &ldquo;blessed opportunity.&rdquo; He said surprise doesn&rsquo;t come close to describing his reaction.</p><p><strong>Bishop Cupich&rsquo;s reaction to his selection:</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168607361&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>Cardinal George said he was relieved and grateful the Pope had honored his request to retire. Each time that was mentioned at the press conference, he punched his arm in the air in apparent joy. All the previous bishops here had died in office.</p><p>George said he&rsquo;s relieved, too, to leave the Archdiocese with &ldquo;such an able and experienced man.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;I described him as well-prepared for his new responsibilities, bringing to them a deep faith, a quick intelligence, personal commitment and varied pastoral experience, and I hope you&rsquo;ve seen that in action in just a very few minutes, and you&rsquo;ll see it in action for many years to come,&rdquo; he said.</p><p><strong>Cardinal George on why he&rsquo;s grateful:</strong><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168607598&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>The Cardinal is facing his third battle with cancer, and is undergoing experimental treatment. Yet he&rsquo;s largely maintained his bruising schedule.</p><p>George will stay in office for the next two months, while Cupich will continue serving as bishop of Spokane. They plan to stay in touch to plan a smooth transition. Once he&rsquo;s retired, George said he hopes to help the new archbishop in any way he can, and to perform confirmations and confessions.</p><p>If he&rsquo;s strong enough, Cardinal George plans to journey to see Pope Francis in Rome in November.</p><p>Bishop Cupich said his first priority will be getting to know people here and the area, talking about the position as an &ldquo;enormous upgrade&rdquo; in reference to the size of the Archdiocese of Chicago compared to his previous dioceses.</p><p>He said he&rsquo;s worked among diverse cultures, including Latinos and Native Americans, and said that it&rsquo;s important for groups to bring their cultures to their religious experience. He&rsquo;s also pushed for immigration reform.</p><p>The bishop -- who headed the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops&rsquo; Committee for the Protection of Children and Young People from 2008-2011 -- said the church must continue to &nbsp;work to protect children from priest sexual abuse and to help heal victims, adding he&rsquo;ll try hard to make that an important part of the ministry.</p><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-b8538668-952b-9c4f-7503-0ff9223cf947">Reaction to the selection was mixed in greater Chicago.</span></p><p>Mary Anne Hackett, president of the conservative Catholic Citizens of Illinois, said she&rsquo;s taking a wait-and-see approach.</p><p>&quot;Personally I don&rsquo;t like the designation moderate for anybody,&quot; she said. &quot;I think it would be nice to take a stand one way or another. That might just be a nice way of saying his position. That will unfold as time goes on.&quot;</p><p dir="ltr">But the Chicago-based national liberal group Call to Action said it&rsquo;s quote &ldquo;relieved&rdquo; to learn Cupich is moderate. In a statement, they said the Pope&rsquo;s selection shows quote &ldquo;a desire for a humbler, more pastoral church.&rdquo;</p><div><p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-8140c6a7-952d-3d48-9bec-bb2f36214810">Local theologian Mike Murphy, who&nbsp;</span><span id="docs-internal-guid-8140c6a7-952d-3d48-9bec-bb2f36214810">h</span>eads Catholic Studies at Loyola University Chicago, called Cupich a good fit for the city. He said the bishop is in line with Pope Francis&rsquo; vision for leadership.</p><p dir="ltr">&quot;He is prepared to lead in a way that shepherds the people and not be anchored down to ideology,&quot; Murphy said. He added that he views Cupich as a moderate who&rsquo;s doctrinally very serious while seeing a need for conversation in a polarized society. Murphy also pointed to the bishop&#39;s work&nbsp;serving the poor.</p><p dir="ltr">Bishop Cupich is now archbishop designate. It&rsquo;s likely he&rsquo;ll someday be appointed cardinal, but that wouldn&rsquo;t happen until after Cardinal George -- who&rsquo;s 77 -- turns 80.</p></div><p>Cupich will be formally installed as the new archbishop of Chicago on Nov. 18 at Holy Name Cathedral.</p></p> Sat, 20 Sep 2014 13:15:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/meet-bishop-blase-cupich-chicagos-incoming-archbishop-110828 Cupich to be next Chicago archbishop http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/cupich-be-next-chicago-archbishop-110827 <p><p>The Vatican has picked a replacement for Chicago&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.archchicago.org/Cardinal/">Cardinal Francis George</a>.</p><p>Pope Francis has tapped Bishop Blase Cupich, who leads the diocese in Spokane, Washington. Before that, Cupich was bishop of Rapid City, South Dakota.</p><p>Pope Francis&#39; choice for Chicago has been closely watched. It is his first major U.S. appointment and the clearest sign yet of the direction he hopes to steer American church leaders. Cupich is a considered a moderate &nbsp;among the U.S. Roman Catholic bishops.&nbsp;</p><blockquote><p><strong><a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/meet-bishop-blase-cupich-chicagos-incoming-archbishop-110828">Meet Bishop Blase Cupich, Chicago&#39;s incoming archbishop</a></strong></p></blockquote><p dir="ltr">Cardinal George has been the spiritual leader for two million Roman Catholics in Lake and Cook County for 17 years now. He&rsquo;s 77, and he&rsquo;s battling cancer for the third time.</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>George first Chicago native as archbishop</strong></p><p>The Cardinal -- the first Chicago native to become archbishop here -- has been a polarizing and at times even controversial leader. But there are contradictions between the Cardinal&rsquo;s public and private life that could shape how we remember him.</p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/168598059&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="100%"></iframe></p><p>As former head of the <a href="http://www.usccb.org/">U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops</a>, the Cardinal led a high-profile fight against Obamacare and the birth control mandate. He&rsquo;s become one of the most prominent voices in the church, nationally and internationally, about what he sees as the dangers of secularism, same-sex marriage and most of all, restrictions on <a href="http://www.mormonnewsroom.org/article/cardinal-george-addresses-religious-freedom-in-speech-at-byu">freedom of religion</a>.</p><p><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/RS5291_CardinalGeorge_Healing_Garden-scr.JPG" style="height: 240px; width: 320px; float: left;" title="Cardinal Francis George (File)" />The Cardinal&rsquo;s often portrayed as unfeeling, aloof, even imperious. But colleagues &ndash; and even some critics &ndash; said there&rsquo;s more to him than that.</p><p>Despite being a powerhouse in the Roman Catholic church, Graziano Marcheschi &ndash; who worked with him for a dozen years at the Archdiocese &ndash; said George is not overly impressed with himself, or the trappings of his office.</p><p>&ldquo;He&rsquo;ll stand in line, he&rsquo;ll grab the paper plate, he&rsquo;ll get the plastic spoon and fork, and he&rsquo;ll put the food on his own plate, and he&rsquo;ll just go sit where there&rsquo;s a place at any table,&rdquo; Marcheschi said. &ldquo;He&rsquo;s not looking for the &lsquo;quote&rsquo; head table, he&rsquo;s not looking for the other power players in the room. He just goes and sits and he talks to whoever&rsquo;s there.&rdquo;</p><p>That doesn&rsquo;t mean the Cardinal&rsquo;s the touchy-feely type. But people who have gotten to know him say he&rsquo;s kinder and has more compassion than people generally give him credit for.</p><p>Marcheschi, who now heads mission and ministry at St. Xavier University, likes to tell a story to illustrate this.</p><p>George was speaking at a retreat for young volunteer ministers several years ago when a young woman asked him about the issue of female priests. The Cardinal told her the church believes it&rsquo;s God&rsquo;s will for men to be priests, not women.</p><p>&ldquo;And the young woman became very distraught, and began to cry, and ran out of the room,&rdquo; Marcheschi said. &ldquo;Well, Cardinal George was just speechless. And then afterward, he turned to my wife and he said, &lsquo;Nancy, what happened?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p>Marcheschi said his wife explained the woman may have felt the church was closing the door on her dreams. Then later some other women at the event asked the Cardinal if they could further discuss the subject of women&rsquo;s ordination later.</p><p>&ldquo;So he said, absolutely, make sure that young woman is part of the group, and I&rsquo;ll be happy to sit down with you,&rdquo; according to Marcheschi.</p><p>The women spent part of a day talking with the Cardinal, but he didn&rsquo;t budge from his view on church teachings prohibiting female priests. (That&rsquo;s a stance he&rsquo;s remained firm on &ndash; in fact, he has asked some priests who openly supported women&rsquo;s ordination to publicly apologize.)</p><p dir="ltr">&ldquo;Obviously the young woman clearly would have liked to have heard something different and didn&rsquo;t,&rdquo; Marcheschi said. &ldquo;But what did happen is she felt heard, she did not feel dismissed. Here she was with the Cardinal Archbishop of Chicago, a man with a global reach, a man who meets with popes and presidents, and he took an afternoon to meet with this young woman because he had seen how distressed she had been.&rdquo;</p><p dir="ltr"><strong>Two views of George legacy</strong></p><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p><div class="image-insert-image "><img alt="" class="image-original_image" src="http://www.wbez.org/system/files/styles/original_image/llo/insert-images/cardinal%20george%202014%20by%20LK%202.JPG" style="height: 465px; width: 620px;" title="Cardinal Francis George speaks earlier this year. (WBEZ/Lynette Kalsnes)" /></div><p>Georgetown University Theology Professor Chester Gillis sees two differing views of George&rsquo;s legacy emerging.</p><p>&ldquo;Those who see him as defending the church against what might be kind of an anti-Christian sentiment in culture and society will raise him as a hero and say he stood against gay marriage, he stood against abortion, he stood against a lot of cultural patterns, and they think that&rsquo;s exactly what he should have done,&rdquo; Gillis said. &ldquo;Others will say that&rsquo;s all he did. That&rsquo;s not true that&rsquo;s all he did, but they&rsquo;ll say he was irrelevant.&rdquo;</p><p>On the progressive side, many see the Cardinal as rigid &ndash; even doctrinaire &ndash; in his view of church teachings.</p><p>&ldquo;He has been a constant complainer about the inroads of secularism and individualism, that those things have crept into the church, and that people aren&rsquo;t like they used to be, and not talking about how the church should be reacting today,&rdquo; said author Robert McClory. McClory is a charter member of the national Catholic group based in Chicago, <a href="http://cta-usa.org/">Call to Action</a>, and writes for the <a href="http://ncronline.org/authors/robert-mcclory">National Catholic Reporter</a>.</p><p>McClory credited the Cardinal with being a hardworking, conscientious overseer of the Archdiocese, but not an innovator.</p><p>&ldquo;He has followed kind of the directives of Pope John Paul II. Keep the church from moving forward, in fact, to keep the church moving backward,&rdquo; McClory said.</p><p>Cardinal George views church teachings in strict terms. He&rsquo;s a noted conservative intellectual, who has earned master&rsquo;s degrees and doctorates in both philosophy and theology. He personally rejects the terms liberal or conservative as being in the realm of politics, not religion. He describes things as being Gospel truth, or not.</p><p>&ldquo;Jesus didn&rsquo;t die on the cross so you could believe anything you want to,&rdquo; he told WBEZ. &ldquo;There is a faith, and the teachers of the faith are the bishops, with a lot of instruction by others. You can say I&rsquo;m Catholic but I don&rsquo;t believe this, I don&rsquo;t believe that. Well, you&rsquo;ve created your own church.&rdquo;</p><p>Perhaps the sharpest criticism is reserved for Cardinal George&rsquo;s handling of the priest sex abuse scandal. He was instrumental in pushing for reforms in the early 2000s that changed how the church handles abuse across the U.S.</p><p>But <a href="http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/survivors-lawyers-say-documents-prove-priest-sex-abuse-cover-109557">church records show</a> he let some <a href="http://www.andersonadvocates.com/Archdiocese-of-Chicago-Documents.aspx">priests stay in their positions despite abuse allegations</a>, and sometimes<a href="http://www.andersonadvocates.com/documents/Key_Chicago_Documents/McCormack%20Ex%20126.pdf"> even after the church review board recommended their removal</a>. Advocates point out the Cardinal also didn&rsquo;t discipline those priests&rsquo; superiors.</p><p>The most notorious case on the Cardinal&rsquo;s watch was that of Daniel McCormack, who was convicted of molesting several boys and named in numerous lawsuits over additional abuse allegations.</p><p>In 2012, the Cardinal told WBEZ: &ldquo;Oh, by far, the most difficult challenge has been the terrible fallout from the sexual abuse of children by some priests. I pray for victims. That&rsquo;s been the overwhelming weight in a sense that has stayed with me.&rdquo;</p><p>The Cardinal&rsquo;s also faced protests from the LGBT community as an outspoken lobbyist against gay marriage.</p><p>He has compared the tactics of some gay rights activists to fascism, and he ignited controversy a few years ago by <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/01/07/chicago-cardinal-apologizes-for-linking-gay-pride-parade-to-ku-klux-klan/">likening organizers of Chicago&rsquo;s gay Pride Parade</a> to &ldquo;something like the Ku Klux Klan&rdquo; when he worried that the parade route would disrupt mass at a local church. He later backtracked and apologized for using an &ldquo;inflammatory&rdquo; analogy.</p><p>&ldquo;I wish he was leaving a legacy as someone who was in the trenches with the poor, as someone who was against gun violence that permeates this city,&rdquo; said Martin Grochala, a board member with <a href="http://www.dignityusa.org/">Dignity Chicago</a>, which advocates for LGBT people in the church. &ldquo;I think unfortunately for LGBT people, his legacy is going to be about advocating against gay marriage.&rdquo;</p><p><strong>&quot;A person of vision&quot;</strong></p><p>But supporter Robert Gilligan, who heads the Catholic Conference of Illinois, called Cardinal George a &ldquo;person of vision.&rdquo;</p><p>Gilligan said the Cardinal clearly and eloquently articulated Catholic church teachings on many issues, including the sacredness of life from conception to death, and that will be what George is remembered for.</p><p>Mary Anne Hackett, who heads the conservative <a href="http://catholiccitizens.org/">Catholic Citizens of Illinois</a>, said she thinks the Cardinal was doing just what he ought to, fighting against abortion and for what she calls &lsquo;true marriage,&rsquo; between a man and a woman.</p><p>&ldquo;What he tried to do was to restore the church in Chicago to what the church teaches,&rdquo; Hackett said. &ldquo;You could call that conservative, I would call that Catholic.&rdquo;</p><p>She acknowledged the Cardinal can sometimes be overly blunt. But she doesn&rsquo;t think those moments will be his lasting legacy:</p><p>&ldquo;He&rsquo;ll be remembered as a person that is open to talk things over, to meet with people of all different persuasions and different opinions, to meet with them, and try to resolve difficulties and differences, on a personal one-to-one basis actually,&rdquo; Hackett said.</p><p>Dignity Chicago&rsquo;s Martin Grochala experienced this firsthand when he and his group met with George several times.</p><p>&ldquo;While we did not see eye to eye on church teaching about sexuality, our conversations were warm and respectful,&rdquo; Grochala said. &ldquo;He was very intelligent and quite, quite quick-witted. Very funny.&rdquo;</p><p>The Cardinal has called this kind of contact with parishioners his greatest joy. And he has packed as much of it as he could into his final days in office. Although he&rsquo;s facing cancer for the third time, George has resembled the Energizer bunny of late.</p><p>His battles with cancer aren&rsquo;t the first time he&rsquo;s faced serious illness. As a teen, George fought polio and overcame it, though the disease left him with a limp. Quigley Preparatory Academy turned him away, saying he was disabled and couldn&rsquo;t be a priest. So George found another religious school, before going on to hold high posts in Rome and being appointed a bishop, archbishop and finally cardinal.</p><p>The Cardinal doesn&rsquo;t plan to entirely slow down. He has said repeatedly that he&rsquo;ll help his successor any way he can. He hopes to spend much of his time doing confirmations and hearing confessions.</p><p>&ldquo;The skill of living is to live as if you&rsquo;re going to die tomorrow and still do your job,&rdquo; the Cardinal said. &ldquo;In a sense prayer does that. You live for a while in a moment where you&rsquo;re not in charge, you&rsquo;re just at God&rsquo;s disposition. And as long as that&rsquo;s the case, then, well, I don&rsquo;t want to die tomorrow, but if I did, I&rsquo;m sure the Lord would still be providential in his care of the Earth. It doesn&rsquo;t depend on me.&rdquo;</p><p><em>WBEZ&rsquo;s Lynette Kalsnes covers religion and culture. Follow her <a href="https://twitter.com/LynetteKalsnes">@Lynette Kalsnes</a></em></p></p> Fri, 19 Sep 2014 20:08:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/news/culture/cupich-be-next-chicago-archbishop-110827 Morning Shift: Different rules for female athletes trying to go pro http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-21/morning-shift-different-rules-female-athletes-trying <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Cover Flickr Keoni Cabral.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Congresswoman Robin Kelly looks back at her first year in office. Also, we take a look at the double standard when it comes to college basketball players going pro. And, remembering Chicago jazz pianist King Flemming.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-different-rules-for-female-ballers-t/embed?header=false&border=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-different-rules-for-female-ballers-t.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-different-rules-for-female-ballers-t" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Different rules for female athletes trying to go pro" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 08:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-21/morning-shift-different-rules-female-athletes-trying Morning Shift: Different rules for female athletes trying to go pro http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-21/morning-shift-different-rules-female-athletes-tryin-0 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Cover Flickr Keoni Cabral.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Congresswoman Robin Kelly looks back at her first year in office. Also, we take a look at the double standard when it comes to college basketball players going pro. And, remembering Chicago jazz pianist King Flemming.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-different-rules-for-female-ballers-t/embed?header=false&amp;border=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-different-rules-for-female-ballers-t.js?header=false&border=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-different-rules-for-female-ballers-t" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Different rules for female athletes trying to go pro" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 21 Apr 2014 08:37:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-21/morning-shift-different-rules-female-athletes-tryin-0 Morning Shift: Examining politicians' self-made narrative http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-09/morning-shift-examining-politicians-self-made <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Cover boots Flickr wormwould.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Politicians love reminding voters of their humble beginnings. We dissect the &quot;bootstrap&quot; narrative. We also hear about Norse mythology from an unlikely source.&nbsp;</p><div class="storify"><iframe src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-examining-the-bootstrap-narrative/embed?header=false" width="100%" height=750 frameborder=no allowtransparency=true></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-examining-the-bootstrap-narrative.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-examining-the-bootstrap-narrative" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Examining politicians' self-made narrative" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Wed, 09 Apr 2014 08:43:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2014-04-09/morning-shift-examining-politicians-self-made Morning Shift: Dealing with first day jitters http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-26/morning-shift-dealing-first-day-jitters-108520 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/Parent-child - Flickr-stephanski.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>Monday marks the first day of school for CPS students, some of whom will be at new schools for the first time. We check in from various schools around the city. And, we discuss strategies for dealing with the anxiety of the first day of school.</p><div class="storify"><iframe allowtransparency="true" frameborder="no" height="750" src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-51/embed?header=false" width="100%"></iframe><script src="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-51.js?header=false"></script><noscript>[<a href="//storify.com/WBEZ/morning-shift-51" target="_blank">View the story "Morning Shift: Dealing with first day jitters" on Storify</a>]</noscript></div></p> Mon, 26 Aug 2013 08:19:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/programs/morning-shift-tony-sarabia/2013-08-26/morning-shift-dealing-first-day-jitters-108520 Cardinal George speaks in support of coalition for free water for nonprofits http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/cardinal-george-speaks-support-coalition-free-water-nonprofits-106913 <p><p>Cardinal Francis George has joined a large interfaith coalition pushing for free or discounted water for religious institutions.</p><p>The coalition, working together since Mayor Rahm Emanuel cut the exemption that gave churches free water in December 2011, is now responding to the mayor&rsquo;s proposal that would charge nonprofits for water based on their assets. Nonprofits with net assets under $1 million would be exempt from paying for water, while those with more than $250 million in assets would pay the full charge. Those in between would pay a discounted rate.</p><p>Cardinal Francis George voiced opposition to the plan, though he was careful in how he addressed his challenge to the mayor:</p><p>&ldquo;As we go forward and people are saying that there has to be some kind of mutual accommodation, I would just like to say that they should look at the budgets and the operating deficits and the savings, much more so than assets,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp; &ldquo;If you don&rsquo;t want a city that only has government institutions, then you have to see to the solvency of religious institutions and other non-profits.&rdquo;</p><p>The Cardinal said he and other religious leaders want to find a middle ground with city officials.</p><p>Aldermen that support the coalition proposed a change to restore the water exemption last December, but that&rsquo;s been stuck in committee.</p><p>In a statement, Tom Alexander, the mayor&rsquo;s deputy communications director, called the asset-based compromise &ldquo;a fair, reasonable proposal that will allow all non-profit institutions the chance to continue providing their vital community services, while paying their fair share, just as residents do.&rdquo;</p><p>Alexander said the measure is the mayor&rsquo;s &ldquo;final proposal&rdquo; after holding meetings with faith leaders, aldermen and community groups. He said they hope to bring the proposal up at the next City Council meeting.</p></p> Tue, 30 Apr 2013 18:03:00 -0500 http://www.wbez.org/sections/religion/cardinal-george-speaks-support-coalition-free-water-nonprofits-106913 Cardinal George and the house of 19 chimneys http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2012-12-18/cardinal-george-and-house-19-chimneys-104453 <img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://llnw.wbez.org//main-images/RS2444_AP060406015168-cardinal george Charles Rex Arbogast-scr.jpg" alt="" /><p><p>I have never been invited to a party at the three story red-brick mansion that sits imposingly on North Avenue between State Parkway and Astor Street. This is the home of Cardinal Francis George.</p><p>This building, often called the &quot;House of 19 Chimneys,&quot; has been the official home of all of Chicago&#39;s Roman Catholic leaders (does it surprise you that there have been only eight?) since it was built in 1885. Their names: Archbishop Patrick A. Feehan, Archbishop James E. Quigley, Cardinals George Mundelein, Samuel Stritch, Albert Meyer, John Cody, Joseph Bernardin and, since 1997, Francis George.</p><p>At the time the mansion was erected it was one of the first homes in the Gold Coast neighborhood. Back then, Archbishop Feehan headed an Archdiocese in which most Catholics were immigrants struggling to find their way in a new nation and culture. In building such an impressive house amid the similarly impressive homes of the city&#39;s elite, Feehan was making a very public statement about the church&#39;s membership in Chicago&#39;s power structure.</p><p>More than a century later, however, the mansion has come to seem, to some people, including Cardinal George, who has taken a vow of poverty, as more than a bit too ostentatious.</p><p>&quot;How do you live in a way that appears simpler when living in that house?&quot; the cardinal said in 2002 when he suggested it should be sold. His advisers, though, dissuaded him, citing its historical significance.</p><p>City light bandleader Rich Daniels gets invited to many fine houses. He&#39;s usually in the company of many musicians, especially over the years he and his band have played at the cardinal&#39;s Christmas party.</p><p>Daniels says of the cardinal&rsquo;s house: &ldquo;Much like any other respected building in Chicago, you feel a sense of history all around you. This home was used by Franklin Roosevelt as a retreat while he was president, not to mention the fact that pope John Paul II stayed and prayed here on his Chicago visits. The home screams respect, dignity and history.&quot;</p><p>Over many years, saxophonist Daniels has filled this house (or at least some of its rooms) with music at Christmas time. There is no doubt that when he does so, he remembers growing up as the only child of Richard and Virginia Daniels in the Wrightwood neighborhood and attending St. Thomas More Catholic Church.</p><p>So, how is the cardinal&#39;s Christmas party?</p><p>&quot;Everyone, including the cardinal, could not have been nicer to us,&quot; Daniels says. &quot;It was terrific and packed with good-spirited guests. It&#39;s always a wonderful event. The cardinal personally greets all of the guests, about 250 people, and takes photos with them near his Christmas tree.&quot;</p><p>I ask him: anybody get drunk and act crazy?</p><p>There was no answer; leading me to the realization that part of being a big band leader is knowing when to be quiet.</p></p> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 15:08:00 -0600 http://www.wbez.org/programs/afternoon-shift/2012-12-18/cardinal-george-and-house-19-chimneys-104453