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Paul Schimmel on Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void, 1949-1962

Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void curator Paul Schimmel discusses the show’s conceptual framework and highlights individual artists and their work.

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Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void curator Paul Schimmel discusses the show’s conceptual framework and highlights individual artists and their work.

Paul Schimmel was the Chief Curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), from 1990 to 2012, and previously served as the Chief Curator of the Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach, CA (1981–89), as well as the Curator (1975–77) and Senior Curator (1977–78) of the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX. While at MOCA, he curated Helter Skelter: LA Art in the 1990s (1992), Hand-Painted Pop: American Art in Transition 1955-1962 (1992), Sigmar Polke Photoworks: When Pictures Vanish (1995), Robert Gober: Untitled (1997), Out of Actions: Between Performance and the Object, 1949-1979 (1998), Charles Ray (1999), Willem de Kooning: Tracing the Figure (2002), Ecstasy: In and About Altered States (2005), Robert Rauschenberg: Combines (2006), © MURAKAMI (2008), Under the Big Black Sun: California Art, 1974-1981 (2011), and Destroy the Picture: Painting the Void, 1949-1962 (2012). He has won numerous awards, including two awards from the Association of Art Museum Curators (AAMC), six awards from the International Association of Art Critics (AICA), and the Award for Curatorial Excellence given by The Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (2001). Schimmel currently serves on the Committee for the Preservation of the White House, the La Caixa Contemporary Art Collection Acquisition Committee, and is a co-Director of the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

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Recorded Wednesday, February 13, 2013 at the Museum of Contemporary Art.



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