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Consider This

Consider This from NPR & WBEZ

Make sense of the biggest stories of the day in Chicago and around the world.

Every afternoon, WBEZ’s Lisa Labuz joins the hosts of NPR’s All Things Considered to help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes. Featuring a mix of local and national stories, Consider This goes beyond the headlines with a quick, but thorough, take on the news.

New episodes out every weekday around 4pm.

The localized feed may not be available if you are listening outside of the Chicago region.

However; you can always hear it by downloading the NPR One app and choosing WBEZ Chicago as your local station.

Recent
The Girl Scouts have been part of American childhood for generations. And now that quintessential experience is helping young girls, who are new to the United States get a sense of belonging. It comes through a Girl Scout troop based in one of New York City’s largest migrant shelters. The shelter has around 3,500 migrants, and all of the Girl Scouts are children of families seeking asylum. For the last few weeks, NPR’s Jasmine Garsd has been spending time with them, and brings us their their story. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
America is a land of contradictions; while we’re known as a nation that loves to eat, we also live within a culture that has long valued thinness as the utmost beauty standard. Over the last several years the body positivity movement has pushed back on that notion. But then came a new class of weight-loss drugs. New York Magazine contributing writer Samhita Mukhopadhyay grapples with the possible future of a movement like this in her recent article, So Was Body Positivity All A Big Lie? She joins All Things Considered host Juana Summers to discuss the ever-evolving conversation on health, size, and whose business that is in the first place. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump have turned their attention on Robert F. Kennedy Jr. recently. And the fact that the major party candidates are either trying to criticize him or praise him is a sign that his independent candidacy could have a real impact. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
When Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace hit screens across the country in 1999, Return of the Jedi felt like ancient history to Star Wars fans. But after 16 long years, the movie let down fans and critics alike. Twenty-five years have changed how a lot of people feel. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
The Biden administration has put a hold on an arms shipment to Israel. A senior administration official speaking on the condition of anonymity told NPR it was due to concerns the bombs could be used in Rafah. Rafah is the site of Israel’s latest campaign in its war against Hamas. It’s also home to some 1.3 million Palestinians. More than half of those people have fled fighting in other parts of Gaza. On Monday night, Israeli tanks rolled into Rafah taking control of the Palestinian side of the border crossing with Egypt. The seizure of the border crossing cuts a key supply line for humanitarian aid. Israel says its incursion in Rafah is a “precise counterterrorism operation.” But possible further military action along with the closed border crossing could exacerbate a humanitarian catastrophe. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
Brittney Griner didn’t know the flight she was taking to Moscow in February 2022 would upend her life. But even before she left for the airport, Griner felt something was off. It was a premonition that foreshadowed a waking nightmare. She had accidentally left two vape cartridges with traces of cannabis oil in her luggage. What followed was nearly 10 months of struggle in a cell, and diplomatic efforts from the U.S. to get her home. Griner reflects on the experience in her new memoir, ‘Coming Home’ and discusses it in depth with NPR’s Juana Summers. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
The term “outside agitator” has staying power. It’s been used against protestors throughout history, from the Civil Rights Movement, to the anti-Vietnam War protests and now during the pro-Palestinian demonstrations on college campuses. “Outside agitator” was also used to describe some of the people who protested the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri In 2014. Who exactly are the “outside agitators” and what purpose does it serve to call them out? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
On Friday, China launched it’s Chang’e-6 mission carrying a probe to the far side of the moon to gather samples and bring them back to Earth. If successful, it would be a first, for ANY country. The race to get astronauts back on the moon is in full swing. The US has serious competition. China wants to put astronauts on the moon by 2030. Other countries are in the race, too. If the U.S. stays on schedule it will get humans back on the moon before anyone else, as part of NASA’s Artemis program. That’s a big if. But NASA is making progress. The space agency’s making a bit of a bet, and mostly relying on private companies, mainly Elon Musk’s SpaceX . With limited resources and facing a more crowded field, it’s unclear if the U.S. will dominate space as it once did. Host Scott Detrow talks to NASA Administrator Bill Nelson about what he is doing to try to keep the U.S. at the front of the race back to the moon. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Every afternoon, WBEZ’s Lisa Labuz joins the hosts of NPR’s All Things Considered to help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes. Featuring a mix of local and national stories, Consider This goes beyond the headlines with a quick, but thorough, take on the news.

New episodes out every weekday around 4pm.

The localized feed may not be available if you are listening outside of the Chicago region.

However; you can always hear it by downloading the NPR One app and choosing WBEZ Chicago as your local station.

Recent
The Girl Scouts have been part of American childhood for generations. And now that quintessential experience is helping young girls, who are new to the United States get a sense of belonging. It comes through a Girl Scout troop based in one of New York City’s largest migrant shelters. The shelter has around 3,500 migrants, and all of the Girl Scouts are children of families seeking asylum. For the last few weeks, NPR’s Jasmine Garsd has been spending time with them, and brings us their their story. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
America is a land of contradictions; while we’re known as a nation that loves to eat, we also live within a culture that has long valued thinness as the utmost beauty standard. Over the last several years the body positivity movement has pushed back on that notion. But then came a new class of weight-loss drugs. New York Magazine contributing writer Samhita Mukhopadhyay grapples with the possible future of a movement like this in her recent article, So Was Body Positivity All A Big Lie? She joins All Things Considered host Juana Summers to discuss the ever-evolving conversation on health, size, and whose business that is in the first place. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump have turned their attention on Robert F. Kennedy Jr. recently. And the fact that the major party candidates are either trying to criticize him or praise him is a sign that his independent candidacy could have a real impact. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
When Star Wars: Episode I: The Phantom Menace hit screens across the country in 1999, Return of the Jedi felt like ancient history to Star Wars fans. But after 16 long years, the movie let down fans and critics alike. Twenty-five years have changed how a lot of people feel. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
The Biden administration has put a hold on an arms shipment to Israel. A senior administration official speaking on the condition of anonymity told NPR it was due to concerns the bombs could be used in Rafah. Rafah is the site of Israel’s latest campaign in its war against Hamas. It’s also home to some 1.3 million Palestinians. More than half of those people have fled fighting in other parts of Gaza. On Monday night, Israeli tanks rolled into Rafah taking control of the Palestinian side of the border crossing with Egypt. The seizure of the border crossing cuts a key supply line for humanitarian aid. Israel says its incursion in Rafah is a “precise counterterrorism operation.” But possible further military action along with the closed border crossing could exacerbate a humanitarian catastrophe. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
Brittney Griner didn’t know the flight she was taking to Moscow in February 2022 would upend her life. But even before she left for the airport, Griner felt something was off. It was a premonition that foreshadowed a waking nightmare. She had accidentally left two vape cartridges with traces of cannabis oil in her luggage. What followed was nearly 10 months of struggle in a cell, and diplomatic efforts from the U.S. to get her home. Griner reflects on the experience in her new memoir, ‘Coming Home’ and discusses it in depth with NPR’s Juana Summers. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
The term “outside agitator” has staying power. It’s been used against protestors throughout history, from the Civil Rights Movement, to the anti-Vietnam War protests and now during the pro-Palestinian demonstrations on college campuses. “Outside agitator” was also used to describe some of the people who protested the killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri In 2014. Who exactly are the “outside agitators” and what purpose does it serve to call them out? For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy
On Friday, China launched it’s Chang’e-6 mission carrying a probe to the far side of the moon to gather samples and bring them back to Earth. If successful, it would be a first, for ANY country. The race to get astronauts back on the moon is in full swing. The US has serious competition. China wants to put astronauts on the moon by 2030. Other countries are in the race, too. If the U.S. stays on schedule it will get humans back on the moon before anyone else, as part of NASA’s Artemis program. That’s a big if. But NASA is making progress. The space agency’s making a bit of a bet, and mostly relying on private companies, mainly Elon Musk’s SpaceX . With limited resources and facing a more crowded field, it’s unclear if the U.S. will dominate space as it once did. Host Scott Detrow talks to NASA Administrator Bill Nelson about what he is doing to try to keep the U.S. at the front of the race back to the moon. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy