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As Climate Change Drives More Disasters, What Can We Learn From 'Katrina Babies'?

SHARE As Climate Change Drives More Disasters, What Can We Learn From 'Katrina Babies'?
As Climate Change Drives More Disasters, What Can We Learn From 'Katrina Babies'?

NEW ORLEANS - AUGUST 29: Water comes up to the roof of homes after Hurricane Katrina came through the area with high winds and water on August 29, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Katrina was down graded to a category 4 storm as it approached New Orleans. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Chris Graythen/Getty Images

It's been 17 years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, permanently changing life for many people across the country.

Over a thousand were killed, and many more were displaced. The city suffered billions of dollars of damage.

New Orleans has slowly recovered over the years, but for many, the trauma of the natural disaster lingers on.

NPR's Juana Summers talks with filmmaker Edward Buckles Jr. about his new documentary, 'Katrina Babies,' which explores the trauma experienced by families and children from Hurricane Katrina.

In participating regions, you’ll also hear a local news segment to help you make sense of what’s going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

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