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Making Wine More Inclusive and Less Pretentious

Andre Mack looks at grapes.

Sash Photography

Making Wine More Inclusive and Less Pretentious

Andre Mack looks at grapes.

Sash Photography

Making Wine More Inclusive and Less Pretentious

The world of wine has long had a reputation for snobbery. And it has long been dominated mostly by white men. But that has slowly begun to change. From sommeliers to vineyard owners, the industry is gradually opening up to more people of color and women. Vintner's associations and vineyards have rolled out recruitment plans and scholarships to provide opportunities for equity, diversity, and inclusion in wine-producing regions. Host Michel Martin speaks with sommelier and anti-wine snob André Hueston Mack, host of Bon Appetit's video series World of Wine. He shares some of his ideas for holiday wine and spirits to gift and serve. And we talk with Chrishon Lampley, owner of the wine company Love Cork Screw, one of the few Black women in the wine industry.

Andre Mack looks at grapes.

Sash Photography

 

The world of wine has long had a reputation for snobbery. And it has long been dominated mostly by white men.

But that has slowly begun to change. From sommeliers to vineyard owners, the industry is gradually opening up to more people of color and women. Vintner's associations and vineyards have rolled out recruitment plans and scholarships to provide opportunities for equity, diversity, and inclusion in wine-producing regions.

Host Michel Martin speaks with sommelier and anti-wine snob André Hueston Mack, host of Bon Appetit's video series World of Wine. He shares some of his ideas for holiday wine and spirits to gift and serve.

And we talk with Chrishon Lampley, owner of the wine company Love Cork Screw, one of the few Black women in the wine industry.

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