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How to Make Better New Year's Resolutions

group of sticky yellow adhesive note papers with a list of new year’s resolutions on the bulletin board

fotosipsak/Getty Images/iStockphoto

How to Make Better New Year's Resolutions

group of sticky yellow adhesive note papers with a list of new year’s resolutions on the bulletin board

fotosipsak/Getty Images/iStockphoto

How to Make Better New Year's Resolutions

It's that time of year - the ball has dropped, the champagne bottles are empty and you have a list of resolutions to start living your best life in 2023. There's plenty of expert advice to help us succeed at making a budget or running a 5K. But research and polling show that many people fail to reach their goals. If you routinely give up your resolutions by February, maybe the key to succeeding is rethinking the whole idea of what a resolution is. NPR's Elissa Nadworny talks with Marielle Segarra, host of Life Kit about why focusing less on goals and more on intentions may be a better approach to making resolutions. And Faith Hill of The Atlantic shares why she decided to stop making New Year's resolutions.

group of sticky yellow adhesive note papers with a list of new year’s resolutions on the bulletin board

fotosipsak/Getty Images/iStockphoto

 

It's that time of year - the ball has dropped, the champagne bottles are empty and you have a list of resolutions to start living your best life in 2023.

There's plenty of expert advice to help us succeed at making a budget or running a 5K. But research and polling show that many people fail to reach their goals. If you routinely give up your resolutions by February, maybe the key to succeeding is rethinking the whole idea of what a resolution is.

NPR's Elissa Nadworny talks with Marielle Segarra, host of Life Kit about why focusing less on goals and more on intentions may be a better approach to making resolutions. And Faith Hill of The Atlantic shares why she decided to stop making New Year's resolutions.

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