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Egypt's Border with Gaza Opened for a Select Few

People sit in the waiting area at the Rafah border crossing in the southern Gaza Strip before crossing into Egypt on November 1, 2023. Scores of foreign passport holders trapped in Gaza started leaving the war-torn Palestinian territory on November 1 when the Rafah crossing to Egypt was opened up for the first time since the October 7 Hamas attacks on Israel, according to AFP correspondents. (Photo by Mohammed ABED / AFP) (Photo by MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images)

MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images

Egypt's Border with Gaza Opened for a Select Few

People sit in the waiting area at the Rafah border crossing in the southern Gaza Strip before crossing into Egypt on November 1, 2023. Scores of foreign passport holders trapped in Gaza started leaving the war-torn Palestinian territory on November 1 when the Rafah crossing to Egypt was opened up for the first time since the October 7 Hamas attacks on Israel, according to AFP correspondents. (Photo by Mohammed ABED / AFP) (Photo by MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images)

MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images

Egypt's Border with Gaza Opened for a Select Few

After weeks of being bombarded by Israeli airstrikes, following the Hamas attacks of October 7th, some in the Gaza strip are finally able to leave the besieged territory. Hundreds of people – including wounded Palestinians and individuals with foreign passports – have now crossed into Egypt. The opening of the Rafah Border is a small diplomatic success in a war that has claimed the lives of thousands of civilians. But it's unclear just how many people will be allowed to make the crossing. Consider This co-host Mary Louise Kelly speaks with NPR's Aya Batrawy, who's in Dubai and has been reporting on the situation. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

People sit in the waiting area at the Rafah border crossing in the southern Gaza Strip before crossing into Egypt on November 1, 2023. Scores of foreign passport holders trapped in Gaza started leaving the war-torn Palestinian territory on November 1 when the Rafah crossing to Egypt was opened up for the first time since the October 7 Hamas attacks on Israel, according to AFP correspondents. (Photo by Mohammed ABED / AFP) (Photo by MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images)

MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images

 

After weeks of being bombarded by Israeli airstrikes, following the Hamas attacks of October 7th, some in the Gaza strip are finally able to leave the besieged territory.

Hundreds of people – including wounded Palestinians and individuals with foreign passports – have now crossed into Egypt.

The opening of the Rafah Border is a small diplomatic success in a war that has claimed the lives of thousands of civilians. But it's unclear just how many people will be allowed to make the crossing.

Consider This co-host Mary Louise Kelly speaks with NPR's Aya Batrawy, who's in Dubai and has been reporting on the situation.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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