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Gun Bans for Domestic Abusers Face a Test at the Supreme Court

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 07: Angela Ferrell-Zabala of Moms Demand Action speaksas activists gather outside of the U.S. Supreme Court for a gun-control rally on November 7, 2023 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear argument today for a case about whether domestic violence offenders are protected by the Second Amendment to own guns. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Gun Bans for Domestic Abusers Face a Test at the Supreme Court

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 07: Angela Ferrell-Zabala of Moms Demand Action speaksas activists gather outside of the U.S. Supreme Court for a gun-control rally on November 7, 2023 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear argument today for a case about whether domestic violence offenders are protected by the Second Amendment to own guns. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Alex Wong/Getty Images

Gun Bans for Domestic Abusers Face a Test at the Supreme Court

At the Supreme Court on Tuesday, justices seemed inclined to uphold a federal law that bans anyone covered by a domestic violence court order from having a gun. But if they do that, the decision will likely be a narrow one, leaving many questions about the future of gun regulations unanswered. NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports. A note to listeners, there is a graphic description of violence in this episode. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 07: Angela Ferrell-Zabala of Moms Demand Action speaksas activists gather outside of the U.S. Supreme Court for a gun-control rally on November 7, 2023 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear argument today for a case about whether domestic violence offenders are protected by the Second Amendment to own guns. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Alex Wong/Getty Images

 

At the Supreme Court on Tuesday, justices seemed inclined to uphold a federal law that bans anyone covered by a domestic violence court order from having a gun.

But if they do that, the decision will likely be a narrow one, leaving many questions about the future of gun regulations unanswered.

NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg reports.

A note to listeners, there is a graphic description of violence in this episode.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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