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Biden's Support of Israel Could Cost Him Votes in 2024

Protesters marching in support of Palestinians fill an intersetion near where the US President was holding a fundraiser while in town for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in San Francisco, on November 14, 2023. Thousands of civilians, both Palestinians and Israelis, have died since October 7, 2023, after Palestinian Hamas militants based in the Gaza Strip entered southern Israel in an unprecedented attack triggering a war declared by Israel on Hamas with retaliatory bombings on Gaza. (Photo by Jason Henry / AFP) (Photo by JASON HENRY/AFP via Getty Images)

JASON HENRY/AFP via Getty Images

Biden's Support of Israel Could Cost Him Votes in 2024

Protesters marching in support of Palestinians fill an intersetion near where the US President was holding a fundraiser while in town for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in San Francisco, on November 14, 2023. Thousands of civilians, both Palestinians and Israelis, have died since October 7, 2023, after Palestinian Hamas militants based in the Gaza Strip entered southern Israel in an unprecedented attack triggering a war declared by Israel on Hamas with retaliatory bombings on Gaza. (Photo by Jason Henry / AFP) (Photo by JASON HENRY/AFP via Getty Images)

JASON HENRY/AFP via Getty Images

Biden's Support of Israel Could Cost Him Votes in 2024

There's a very real possibility that the 2024 presidential election could come down to a few thousand votes in a few pivotal states. One of those states is Michigan, which is home to a large Arab American community — with some two hundred thousand registered voters. Many of those voters say that the White House has disproportionately supported Israel, while doing little to protect the lives of Palestinians. And that position could cost President Biden their votes. Meanwhile, the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll shows how the Israel-Hamas War has divided Americans along racial and generational lines. NPR National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea reports from Detroit on the concerns of Arab American voters. And Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro about what the latest polling tells us about Americans' changing views on Biden's support of Israel. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

Protesters marching in support of Palestinians fill an intersetion near where the US President was holding a fundraiser while in town for the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in San Francisco, on November 14, 2023. Thousands of civilians, both Palestinians and Israelis, have died since October 7, 2023, after Palestinian Hamas militants based in the Gaza Strip entered southern Israel in an unprecedented attack triggering a war declared by Israel on Hamas with retaliatory bombings on Gaza. (Photo by Jason Henry / AFP) (Photo by JASON HENRY/AFP via Getty Images)

JASON HENRY/AFP via Getty Images

 

There's a very real possibility that the 2024 presidential election could come down to a few thousand votes in a few pivotal states.

One of those states is Michigan, which is home to a large Arab American community — with some two hundred thousand registered voters. Many of those voters say that the White House has disproportionately supported Israel, while doing little to protect the lives of Palestinians. And that position could cost President Biden their votes.

Meanwhile, the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll shows how the Israel-Hamas War has divided Americans along racial and generational lines.

NPR National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea reports from Detroit on the concerns of Arab American voters. And Host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro about what the latest polling tells us about Americans' changing views on Biden's support of Israel.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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