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How the Hostage Deal Looks to Palestinians and Israelis

Relatives, friends and supporters of Ditza Heiman (84) held hostage in Gaza since the October 7 attack by Hamas militants in southern Israel, take part in a protest to ask for the release of Israeli hostages in Tel Aviv on November 22, 2023. (Photo by AHMAD GHARABLI / AFP) (Photo by AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images)

AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images

How the Hostage Deal Looks to Palestinians and Israelis

Relatives, friends and supporters of Ditza Heiman (84) held hostage in Gaza since the October 7 attack by Hamas militants in southern Israel, take part in a protest to ask for the release of Israeli hostages in Tel Aviv on November 22, 2023. (Photo by AHMAD GHARABLI / AFP) (Photo by AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images)

AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images

How the Hostage Deal Looks to Palestinians and Israelis

On Wednesday, Israel and Hamas announced details of a deal that calls for the freeing of at least 50 Israeli women and minors taken hostage during last month's Hamas attack on Israel in exchange for at least 150 Palestinian women and minors held in Israeli jails. NPR correspondents Brian Mann in Israel, and Lauren Frayer in the occupied West Bank, report on how Israelis and Palestinians are reacting to this moment. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

Relatives, friends and supporters of Ditza Heiman (84) held hostage in Gaza since the October 7 attack by Hamas militants in southern Israel, take part in a protest to ask for the release of Israeli hostages in Tel Aviv on November 22, 2023. (Photo by AHMAD GHARABLI / AFP) (Photo by AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images)

AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP via Getty Images

 

On Wednesday, Israel and Hamas announced details of a deal that calls for the freeing of at least 50 Israeli women and minors taken hostage during last month's Hamas attack on Israel in exchange for at least 150 Palestinian women and minors held in Israeli jails.

NPR correspondents Brian Mann in Israel, and Lauren Frayer in the occupied West Bank, report on how Israelis and Palestinians are reacting to this moment.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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