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Rosalynn Carter Practiced What She Preached

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - APRIL 20: Former first lady Rosalynn Carter speaks at the Death Penalty Focus Awards, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, on April 20, 2004 in Beverly Hills, California. The anti death penalty awards highlight a growing national movement against capital punishment. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Rosalynn Carter Practiced What She Preached

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - APRIL 20: Former first lady Rosalynn Carter speaks at the Death Penalty Focus Awards, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, on April 20, 2004 in Beverly Hills, California. The anti death penalty awards highlight a growing national movement against capital punishment. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Rosalynn Carter Practiced What She Preached

Former first lady Rosalynn Carter leaves behind a rich and expansive legacy, including fierce and enduring advocacy for better mental health care in the US. But her commitment to the issue extended well beyond her role as First Lady. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Anne Mahoney Robbins, a friend of the Carters and member of President Jimmy Carter's mental health commission, about how Rosalynn Carter supported her during her own crippling depression. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - APRIL 20: Former first lady Rosalynn Carter speaks at the Death Penalty Focus Awards, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, on April 20, 2004 in Beverly Hills, California. The anti death penalty awards highlight a growing national movement against capital punishment. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

 

Former first lady Rosalynn Carter leaves behind a rich and expansive legacy, including fierce and enduring advocacy for better mental health care in the US.

But her commitment to the issue extended well beyond her role as First Lady.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Anne Mahoney Robbins, a friend of the Carters and member of President Jimmy Carter's mental health commission, about how Rosalynn Carter supported her during her own crippling depression.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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