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The Seriousness of America's Latest Homegrown Spy

US ambassador to Bolivia, Manuel Rocha, talks to the press 11 July 2001. Rocha reiterated that the US supports the provisional government, led by Vice President Jorge Quiroga Ramirez, since 02 July when President Hugo Banzer was admitted to a Washington DC hospital for cancer treatment. El embajador de los Estados Unidos en Bolivia, Manuel Rocha declara a la prensa el 11 de julio de 2001 en La Paz. Rocha reitero que Estados Unidos “apoya plenamente” el gobierno transitorio boliviano al mando del Vicepresidente Jorge Quiroga Ramirez, quien ejerce la presidencia del pais desde el pasado 02 de julio, fecha en la que el presidente Hugo Banzer Viajo a Washington DC para someterse a un tratamiento medico que diagnostico un cancer en el pulmon izquierdo y el higado, por lo que Banzer permanecera hospitalizado por treinta dias mas. AFP/PHOTO Gonzalo ESPINOZA (Photo by GONZALO ESPINOZA / AFP) (Photo by GONZALO ESPINOZA/AFP via Getty Images)

GONZALO ESPINOZA/AFP via Getty Images

The Seriousness of America's Latest Homegrown Spy

US ambassador to Bolivia, Manuel Rocha, talks to the press 11 July 2001. Rocha reiterated that the US supports the provisional government, led by Vice President Jorge Quiroga Ramirez, since 02 July when President Hugo Banzer was admitted to a Washington DC hospital for cancer treatment. El embajador de los Estados Unidos en Bolivia, Manuel Rocha declara a la prensa el 11 de julio de 2001 en La Paz. Rocha reitero que Estados Unidos “apoya plenamente” el gobierno transitorio boliviano al mando del Vicepresidente Jorge Quiroga Ramirez, quien ejerce la presidencia del pais desde el pasado 02 de julio, fecha en la que el presidente Hugo Banzer Viajo a Washington DC para someterse a un tratamiento medico que diagnostico un cancer en el pulmon izquierdo y el higado, por lo que Banzer permanecera hospitalizado por treinta dias mas. AFP/PHOTO Gonzalo ESPINOZA (Photo by GONZALO ESPINOZA / AFP) (Photo by GONZALO ESPINOZA/AFP via Getty Images)

GONZALO ESPINOZA/AFP via Getty Images

The Seriousness of America's Latest Homegrown Spy

Diplomat and former US Ambassador Manuel Rocha is facing charges related to secretly serving as an agent of Cuba's government. Rocha is the latest in a long line of spies, who have worked for the federal government while spying for other countries. Some for decades at a time. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to former CIA officer Robert Baer about the charges against Rocha and how he might have managed to go undetected for four decades. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

US ambassador to Bolivia, Manuel Rocha, talks to the press 11 July 2001. Rocha reiterated that the US supports the provisional government, led by Vice President Jorge Quiroga Ramirez, since 02 July when President Hugo Banzer was admitted to a Washington DC hospital for cancer treatment. El embajador de los Estados Unidos en Bolivia, Manuel Rocha declara a la prensa el 11 de julio de 2001 en La Paz. Rocha reitero que Estados Unidos “apoya plenamente” el gobierno transitorio boliviano al mando del Vicepresidente Jorge Quiroga Ramirez, quien ejerce la presidencia del pais desde el pasado 02 de julio, fecha en la que el presidente Hugo Banzer Viajo a Washington DC para someterse a un tratamiento medico que diagnostico un cancer en el pulmon izquierdo y el higado, por lo que Banzer permanecera hospitalizado por treinta dias mas. AFP/PHOTO Gonzalo ESPINOZA (Photo by GONZALO ESPINOZA / AFP) (Photo by GONZALO ESPINOZA/AFP via Getty Images)

GONZALO ESPINOZA/AFP via Getty Images

 

Diplomat and former US Ambassador Manuel Rocha is facing charges related to secretly serving as an agent of Cuba's government.

Rocha is the latest in a long line of spies, who have worked for the federal government while spying for other countries. Some for decades at a time.

NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly talks to former CIA officer Robert Baer about the charges against Rocha and how he might have managed to go undetected for four decades.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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