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Women Candidates and the Race for Big Money

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA - FEBRUARY 15: Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley arrives on stage at her first campaign event on February 15, 2023 in Charleston, South Carolina. Former South Carolina Governor and United Nations ambassador Haley, officially announced her candidacy yesterday, making her the first Republican opponent to challenge former U.S. President Donald Trump. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Women Candidates and the Race for Big Money

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA - FEBRUARY 15: Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley arrives on stage at her first campaign event on February 15, 2023 in Charleston, South Carolina. Former South Carolina Governor and United Nations ambassador Haley, officially announced her candidacy yesterday, making her the first Republican opponent to challenge former U.S. President Donald Trump. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Women Candidates and the Race for Big Money

A woman has never been president. Hillary Clinton has come the closest, but that highest, hardest glass ceiling is still intact. Now Republican Nikki Haley wants to succeed where her predecessors have not. The list of reasons a woman hasn't won is long — sexism, lack of representation in circles of power, and lack of representation in circles of money. But Nikki Haley has just scored an endorsement from the Koch Network that could change that. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks to Political Scientist Kira Sonbonmatsu about the inequities between men and women when it comes to fundraising and what the Koch Network endorsement could mean for Haley. Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA - FEBRUARY 15: Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley arrives on stage at her first campaign event on February 15, 2023 in Charleston, South Carolina. Former South Carolina Governor and United Nations ambassador Haley, officially announced her candidacy yesterday, making her the first Republican opponent to challenge former U.S. President Donald Trump. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Win McNamee/Getty Images

 

A woman has never been president. Hillary Clinton has come the closest, but that highest, hardest glass ceiling is still intact. Now Republican Nikki Haley wants to succeed where her predecessors have not.

The list of reasons a woman hasn't won is long — sexism, lack of representation in circles of power, and lack of representation in circles of money. But Nikki Haley has just scored an endorsement from the Koch Network that could change that.

NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly talks to Political Scientist Kira Sonbonmatsu about the inequities between men and women when it comes to fundraising and what the Koch Network endorsement could mean for Haley.

Email us at
considerthis@npr.org.

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