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65 Years After Release, A Rockin' Christmas Classic Hits Number One

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE - NOVEMBER 08: EDITORIAL USE ONLY Brenda Lee attends the 57th Annual CMA Awards at Bridgestone Arena on November 08, 2023 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

Jason Kempin/Getty Images

65 Years After Release, A Rockin' Christmas Classic Hits Number One

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE - NOVEMBER 08: EDITORIAL USE ONLY Brenda Lee attends the 57th Annual CMA Awards at Bridgestone Arena on November 08, 2023 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

Jason Kempin/Getty Images

65 Years After Release, A Rockin' Christmas Classic Hits Number One

Brenda Lee was just 13 years old when she recorded "Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree" in 1958. It's a true Christmas classic, a bouncy earworm — and pretty much everyone knows the lyrics. But it's never made it to number one on Billboard's Hot 100 — until now. It's a true Christmas classic, a bouncy earworm — and pretty much everyone knows the lyrics. But it's never made it to number one on Billboard's Hot 100 — until now. NPR's Scott Detrow spoke with the 78-year-old about her long career and how she feels now that her iconic holiday tune is finally at the top of the charts. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE - NOVEMBER 08: EDITORIAL USE ONLY Brenda Lee attends the 57th Annual CMA Awards at Bridgestone Arena on November 08, 2023 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

Jason Kempin/Getty Images

 

Brenda Lee was just 13 years old when she recorded "Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree" in 1958. It's a true Christmas classic, a bouncy earworm — and pretty much everyone knows the lyrics. But it's never made it to number one on Billboard's Hot 100 — until now. It's a true Christmas classic, a bouncy earworm — and pretty much everyone knows the lyrics. But it's never made it to number one on Billboard's Hot 100 — until now.

NPR's Scott Detrow spoke with the 78-year-old about her long career and how she feels now that her iconic holiday tune is finally at the top of the charts.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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