Your NPR news source
Trump's Authoritarian Impulses and the Justice Department

DALLAS, TEXAS - AUGUST 06: Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas. CPAC began in 1974, and is a conference that brings together and hosts conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders in discussing current events and future political agendas. (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Trump's Authoritarian Impulses and the Justice Department

DALLAS, TEXAS - AUGUST 06: Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas. CPAC began in 1974, and is a conference that brings together and hosts conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders in discussing current events and future political agendas. (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Trump's Authoritarian Impulses and the Justice Department

If Donald Trump is elected next November, he's promising to use the power of the presidency to go after political enemies and perceived rivals. In a recent interview with Fox's Sean Hannity, the former President said he'd only be a dictator on "day one." At other moments, he's pledged to "root out the communists," and said he'd have his Attorney General go after people who run against him. Consider This host Scott Detrow and NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson breakdown what a second Trump term would mean for the Justice Department. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

DALLAS, TEXAS - AUGUST 06: Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas. CPAC began in 1974, and is a conference that brings together and hosts conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders in discussing current events and future political agendas. (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

Brandon Bell/Getty Images

 

If Donald Trump is elected next November, he's promising to use the power of the presidency to go after political enemies and perceived rivals.

In a recent interview with Fox's Sean Hannity, the former President said he'd only be a dictator on "day one." At other moments, he's pledged to "root out the communists," and said he'd have his Attorney General go after people who run against him.

Consider This host Scott Detrow and NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson breakdown what a second Trump term would mean for the Justice Department.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

More From This Show
The Girl Scouts have been part of American childhood for generations. And now that quintessential experience is helping young girls, who are new to the United States get a sense of belonging. It comes through a Girl Scout troop based in one of New York City’s largest migrant shelters. The shelter has around 3,500 migrants, and all of the Girl Scouts are children of families seeking asylum. For the last few weeks, NPR’s Jasmine Garsd has been spending time with them, and brings us their their story. For sponsor-free episodes of Consider This, sign up for Consider This+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org. Email us at considerthis@npr.org. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy