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Trump's Trials: Jack Smith's 'masterstroke'

The US Supreme Court is seen in Washington, DC on November 13, 2023. The US Supreme Court unveiled an ethics code following a series of scandals over lavish gifts and luxury vacations received by some of its justices. The nine members of the nation’s highest court are the only federal judges not explicitly subject to ethical oversight, and pressure has been mounting from Democrats in the Senate for them to adopt a code of conduct. (Photo by Mandel NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's Trials: Jack Smith's 'masterstroke'

The US Supreme Court is seen in Washington, DC on November 13, 2023. The US Supreme Court unveiled an ethics code following a series of scandals over lavish gifts and luxury vacations received by some of its justices. The nine members of the nation’s highest court are the only federal judges not explicitly subject to ethical oversight, and pressure has been mounting from Democrats in the Senate for them to adopt a code of conduct. (Photo by Mandel NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Trump's Trials: Jack Smith's 'masterstroke'

Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. They are joined by former Deputy Assistant Attorney General Harry Litman. This week's focus: the January 6th federal election interference case. Prosecutor, Special Counsel Jack Smith, made an unusual move, and sidestepped the appeals court and went straight to the Supreme Court to answer a fundamental question at the heart of the case:. Can presidents be criminally prosecuted for crimes they are allegedly committed while in office? Topics include: - Presidential immunity - Does presidential immunity apply to Trump's actions on January 6th - Predictions on how the Supreme Court may respond - New case timeline - An update on the New York Civil Fraud trial Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday. Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials. Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.

The US Supreme Court is seen in Washington, DC on November 13, 2023. The US Supreme Court unveiled an ethics code following a series of scandals over lavish gifts and luxury vacations received by some of its justices. The nine members of the nation’s highest court are the only federal judges not explicitly subject to ethical oversight, and pressure has been mounting from Democrats in the Senate for them to adopt a code of conduct. (Photo by Mandel NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)

MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

 

Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. They are joined by former Deputy Assistant Attorney General Harry Litman.

This week's focus: the January 6th federal election interference case. Prosecutor, Special Counsel Jack Smith, made an unusual move, and sidestepped the appeals court and went straight to the Supreme Court to answer a fundamental question at the heart of the case:. Can presidents be criminally prosecuted for crimes they are allegedly committed while in office?

Topics include:
- Presidential immunity
- Does presidential immunity apply to Trump's actions on January 6th
- Predictions on how the Supreme Court may respond
- New case timeline
- An update on the New York Civil Fraud trial

Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.

Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.

Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.

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