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We Have Our Favorites, But What Makes A Christmas Movie A Classic?

James Stewart, left, Thomas Mitchell, right, and Donna Reed appear in the 1946 movie “It’s A Wonderful Life.” (AP Photo)

Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS

We Have Our Favorites, But What Makes A Christmas Movie A Classic?

James Stewart, left, Thomas Mitchell, right, and Donna Reed appear in the 1946 movie “It’s A Wonderful Life.” (AP Photo)

Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS

We Have Our Favorites, But What Makes A Christmas Movie A Classic?

Maybe you and your family are gathering round the new 65 inch TV that Santa brought and snuggling in with some hot cocoa for your yearly holiday movie marathon. Your tradition may include It's a Wonderful Life, or cheering on the Grinch's loyal dog Max, or fighting with your spouse over whether or not Die Hard is a Christmas movie. If you celebrate Christmas, you probably have a movie that you consider the best. There's personal preference, but what other elements give a Christmas movie staying power for generation after generation? Host Scott Detrow talks with NPR's pop culture correspondent Linda Holmes about what makes a classic a classic. Email us at considerthis@npr.org

James Stewart, left, Thomas Mitchell, right, and Donna Reed appear in the 1946 movie “It’s A Wonderful Life.” (AP Photo)

Anonymous/ASSOCIATED PRESS

 

Maybe you and your family are gathering round the new 65 inch TV that Santa brought and snuggling in with some hot cocoa for your yearly holiday movie marathon.

Your tradition may include It's a Wonderful Life, or cheering on the Grinch's loyal dog Max, or fighting with your spouse over whether or not Die Hard is a Christmas movie.

If you celebrate Christmas, you probably have a movie that you consider the best. There's personal preference, but what other elements give a Christmas movie staying power for generation after generation?

Host Scott Detrow talks with NPR's pop culture correspondent Linda Holmes about what makes a classic a classic.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org

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