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Daily Rehearsal: Sudeikis to stay at SNL, for now anyway

Straight off of the recent new Chicago-full line-up at Saturday Night Live, former Chicagoan Jason Sudekis will be with SNL at least through January, reports the New York Times.

SHARE Daily Rehearsal: Sudeikis to stay at SNL, for now anyway
Daily Rehearsal: Sudeikis to stay at SNL, for now anyway

- Straight off of the recent new Chicago-full line-up at Saturday Night Live, former Chicagoan Jason Sudekis will be with SNL at least through January, reports the New York Times. “He’s a fiercely loyal guy, both to the show and to me,” said Lorne Michaels. Also, they don’t have anyone else to play Mitt Romney.

- More options for those trying to find ways to get those kids entertained during the CTU strike. Head to Prop Thtr’s Neurokitchen’s Curiosity Club Strike Camp which “will nurture kids inquisitiveness and encourage them to take initiative for their own learning” and costs $40 a day. Brain Surgeon‘s Make a Movie Camp (also at Prop Thtr) teaches kids how to make a movie at $45 a day. Studio BE is doing a variety of things, including dance, and for only $20. Hubbard Street Dance also has dance classes for $60 a day.

Questions? Tips? Email kdries@wbez.org.

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