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New service brings chefs into diners’ homes

Kitchensurfing joins a growing movement in Chicago that brings chefs to unusual places, even into your home.

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New service brings chefs into diners’ homes

File: A chef at work. Kitchensurfing joins a growing movement in Chicago that brings chefs to unusual places, even into your home.

Flickr/geezaweezer

A new online service will allow Chicagoans to hire local chefs to prepare a meal in their kitchen.

The Chicago branch of Kitchensurfing recently launched its website, which offers a list of 47 chefs who will pick up the groceries, cook a meal of the diner’s choice and even clean up.

The company joins a growing number of businesses in Chicago that bring chefs to unusual places, from underground supper clubs to companies that offer similar services such as weekly meals made in the diner’s home. Some offer in-home cooking lessons.

Kitchensurfing’s co-founder and Chief Executive Officer Chris Muscarella said his business started in New York and expects to do well in Chicago’s foodie culture.

“People entertain more at home here than they do in a place like they do in New York, where people have smaller spaces,” Muscarella said. “But they also really enjoy dining and food (as) witnessed by the burgeoning restaurant scene in Chicago.”

Muscarella said the company plans to add more chefs to its roster.

Lee Jian Chung is a WBEZ arts and culture intern. Follow him @jclee89.

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