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What it’s like to be a foster parent during the opioid crisis

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A memorial calls into question Gods existence on April 20, 2017 in Huntington, West Virginia. - Huntington, the city in the northwest corner of West Virginia, bordering Kentucky, has been portrayed as the epicenter of the opioid crisis. On August 15, 2016, from 3:00 pm to 9:00 pm, 28 people in the city overdosed on heroin laced with fentanyl, a synthetic opioid far more powerful and dangerous than heroin. The economic incentives are powerful: one kilogram of fentanyl costs $5,000, which can make a million tablets sold at $20 each for a gain of $20 million. “This epidemic doesn’t discriminate,” Huntington Mayor Steve Williams said. “Our youngest overdose was 12 years old. The oldest was 77.” (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) / TO GO WITH AFP STORY by Heather SCOTT, US-health-drugs-WestVirginia (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

We talked a bit yesterday about West Virginia, which has the highest rate of children in foster care in the nation, thanks largely to the opioid crisis. Today, we’re continuing that story by looking at some of the challenges facing foster parents there. Plus: The impact California’s power outages are having on low-income households, and why negotiating a salary is so hard.

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