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Pay Now Illinois To State: Stop Gap Budget Not Enough

Social service providers who are suing Governor Bruce Rauner say the state’s temporary spending plan isn’t sufficient. The Pay Now Illinois coalition sued Governor Rauner for not paying what the state owed during the budget impasse from last fiscal year.

On Friday, they filed documents saying the stop-gap budget isn’t enough of a fix because it “doesn’t guarantee any meaningful payment”.

The group, which is made up of nearly 100 social service providers, says it’s owed about 161 million dollars in unpaid work. They want the court to force the state to pay. The next hearing is scheduled for later this morning.

SHARE Pay Now Illinois To State: Stop Gap Budget Not Enough

Social service providers who are suing Governor Bruce Rauner say the state’s temporary spending plan isn’t sufficient. The Pay Now Illinois coalition sued Governor Rauner for not paying what the state owed during the budget impasse from last fiscal year.

On Friday, they filed documents saying the stop-gap budget isn’t enough of a fix because it “doesn’t guarantee any meaningful payment”.

The group, which is made up of nearly 100 social service providers, says it’s owed about 161 million dollars in unpaid work. They want the court to force the state to pay. The next hearing is scheduled for later this morning.

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