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Feds Recommend Cohen Be Imprisoned; Special Counsel Says It Can Prove Manafort Lied

In a much-anticipated court filing Friday evening, prosecutors argued against leniency for Cohen, saying he had committed four federal crimes over the course of several years. Cohen, they say, was “motivated by personal greed,” and they argue that he “repeatedly used his power and influence for deceptive ends.” And the government says Paul Manafort allegedly lied to prosecutors about his communications with officials in the Trump administration, “information pertinent to another Department of Justice investigation” and more. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

SHARE Feds Recommend Cohen Be Imprisoned; Special Counsel Says It Can Prove Manafort Lied

In a much-anticipated court filing Friday evening, prosecutors argued against leniency for Cohen, saying he had committed four federal crimes over the course of several years. Cohen, they say, was “motivated by personal greed,” and they argue that he “repeatedly used his power and influence for deceptive ends.” And the government says Paul Manafort allegedly lied to prosecutors about his communications with officials in the Trump administration, “information pertinent to another Department of Justice investigation” and more. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.

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