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Supreme Court Elections

Laurie Woodward Garcia of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., dresses at the Statue of Liberty and holds a sign that reads “Justices Step Up and Unite Us. Do not Divide Us” in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022, as the Court hears arguments on a new elections case that could dramatically alter voting in 2024 and beyond. The case is from highly competitive North Carolina, where Republican efforts to draw congressional districts heavily in their favor were blocked by a Democratic majority on the state Supreme Court.

Andrew Harnik

Supreme Court Elections

Laurie Woodward Garcia of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., dresses at the Statue of Liberty and holds a sign that reads “Justices Step Up and Unite Us. Do not Divide Us” in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022, as the Court hears arguments on a new elections case that could dramatically alter voting in 2024 and beyond. The case is from highly competitive North Carolina, where Republican efforts to draw congressional districts heavily in their favor were blocked by a Democratic majority on the state Supreme Court.

Andrew Harnik

The Supreme Court debates discrimination, elections and student loan debt

Can a website designer refuse to work with same-sex couples even though the state has an anti-discrimination law? How much power should state courts have when it comes to federal elections? The Supreme Court will soon be weighing in. Reset gets a rundown on these issues and more and what it could mean for us. GUEST: Steven Schwinn, professor at University of Illinois Chicago Law School

Laurie Woodward Garcia of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., dresses at the Statue of Liberty and holds a sign that reads “Justices Step Up and Unite Us. Do not Divide Us” in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2022, as the Court hears arguments on a new elections case that could dramatically alter voting in 2024 and beyond. The case is from highly competitive North Carolina, where Republican efforts to draw congressional districts heavily in their favor were blocked by a Democratic majority on the state Supreme Court.

Andrew Harnik

   

Can a website designer refuse to work with same-sex couples even though the state has an anti-discrimination law? How much power should state courts have when it comes to federal elections? The Supreme Court will soon be weighing in.

Reset gets a rundown on these issues and more and what it could mean for us.

GUEST: Steven Schwinn, professor at University of Illinois Chicago Law School

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