Your NPR news source
How ending workplace ageism could boost employees and employers

Susan Crowley, a 75-year-old retired attorney, works on her laptop at her home with her dog, Mollie, at her side in Hood River, Ore., on Jan. 23, 2021. Crowley submitted public comments to Oregon’s vaccine advisory committee to criticize the state’s controversial decision to vaccinate its teachers and early childhood care givers ahead of its oldest residents. Teachers in Oregon are eligible for the vaccine this week, two weeks ahead of the state’s oldest residents and more than a month ahead of those between age 65 and 70. Oregon’s decision underscores the difficult moral dilemma facing local and state public health officials as they weigh which populations need the vaccine most urgently amid a nationwide dose shortage. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Gillian Flaccus/AP

How ending workplace ageism could boost employees and employers

Susan Crowley, a 75-year-old retired attorney, works on her laptop at her home with her dog, Mollie, at her side in Hood River, Ore., on Jan. 23, 2021. Crowley submitted public comments to Oregon’s vaccine advisory committee to criticize the state’s controversial decision to vaccinate its teachers and early childhood care givers ahead of its oldest residents. Teachers in Oregon are eligible for the vaccine this week, two weeks ahead of the state’s oldest residents and more than a month ahead of those between age 65 and 70. Oregon’s decision underscores the difficult moral dilemma facing local and state public health officials as they weigh which populations need the vaccine most urgently amid a nationwide dose shortage. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Gillian Flaccus/AP

How ending workplace ageism could boost employees and employers

Age discrimination is prohibited in organizations and programs that receive federal funding, but the Urban Institute and ProPublica published a study in 2018 that found 56% of workers 50 or older said they were pushed out of jobs they’d had for a long time and long before they wanted to retire. Reset hears from advocates who say it’s time for a change. GUESTS: Mary O’Donnell, president of RRF Foundation for Aging Tom Kuczmarski, member of RRF Board of Trustees, founder Kuczmarski Innovation consulting firm

Susan Crowley, a 75-year-old retired attorney, works on her laptop at her home with her dog, Mollie, at her side in Hood River, Ore., on Jan. 23, 2021. Crowley submitted public comments to Oregon’s vaccine advisory committee to criticize the state’s controversial decision to vaccinate its teachers and early childhood care givers ahead of its oldest residents. Teachers in Oregon are eligible for the vaccine this week, two weeks ahead of the state’s oldest residents and more than a month ahead of those between age 65 and 70. Oregon’s decision underscores the difficult moral dilemma facing local and state public health officials as they weigh which populations need the vaccine most urgently amid a nationwide dose shortage. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Gillian Flaccus/AP

   

Age discrimination is prohibited in organizations and programs that receive federal funding, but the Urban Institute and ProPublica published a study in 2018 that found 56% of workers 50 or older said they were pushed out of jobs they’d had for a long time and long before they wanted to retire. 

Reset hears from advocates who say it’s time for a change. 

GUESTS: Mary O’Donnell, president of RRF Foundation for Aging 

Tom Kuczmarski, member of RRF Board of Trustees, founder Kuczmarski Innovation consulting firm

More From This Show
Author Michele Weldon creates intersections of her experiences with pop culture, media, consumerism, family traditions, and healthcare.
A report from Enrich Chicago reveals shifting commitments to supporting the BIPOC arts since 2020.
After the 3.4 quake lightly shook Dekalb county early on Monday morning, lots of Illinoisans were surprised, to say the least.