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Howard Brown Health doctor Alfred Torrence treats patients statewide from his North Side home. He said telehealth’s expansion during the pandemic allows them to treat LGBTQ patients that may be far off from an affirming provider, people with disabilities and those who don’t have reliable transportation.

Katherine Nagasawa

Doctor typing on keyboard

Howard Brown Health doctor Alfred Torrence treats patients statewide from his North Side home. He said telehealth’s expansion during the pandemic allows them to treat LGBTQ patients that may be far off from an affirming provider, people with disabilities and those who don’t have reliable transportation.

Katherine Nagasawa

Inside the ‘hospital at home’ movement

TK

Howard Brown Health doctor Alfred Torrence treats patients statewide from his North Side home. He said telehealth’s expansion during the pandemic allows them to treat LGBTQ patients that may be far off from an affirming provider, people with disabilities and those who don’t have reliable transportation.

Katherine Nagasawa

   

Home health care is on the rise, and hundreds of programs across the country are finding many benefits for patients and hospitals.

Reset learns more about these programs and takes your questions about home health care.

GUESTS: Helen Ouyang, ER doctor, contributing writer for the New York Times

Dr. Luke Neill, medical director of the Hospital at Home program, Northwestern Medicine

Samantha Hyche, nurse practitioner, SAJ Family Practice Health and Wellness Center LLC

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