Your NPR news source
Chicago Public Schools students behind window

Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014.

Chicago Public Schools students behind window

Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014.

Most CPS grads don’t finish college in four years, UChicago study says

The study shows that fewer than one-third of 2014 Chicago Public Schools graduates finished college in four years.

Students gather behind a window that reads “Chicago Public Schools.” Most CPS graduates who immediately went on to college took more than four years to complete their education, according to data from the CPS class of 2014.

   

Nationally, most students expect to finish college in four years, but many take longer to graduate. This is especially true for Chicago Public Schools students, according to an University of Chicago study.

Reset checks in with two co-authors of that study, as well as the CPS director of college pathways to hear about this issue — and what efforts are needed to solve it.

GUESTS: Jenny Nagaoka, co-author on UChicago “Four Years Fallacy” study and deputy director of UChicago Consortium on School Research

Alex Usher, co-author on UChicago “Four Years Fallacy” study and associate director of The To&Through Project at The University of Chicago

Brian Harris, director of college pathways for Chicago Public Schools

More From This Show
More than 100 people were shot over July Fourth weekend. Two more Illinois congressmen call for Biden to exit the campaign.
Chicago artist Smooth Rogers is out with a new album.
The Patel Brothers grocery has been a staple of Devon Avenue since 1974.