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Patrick Johnson medallion

Pat Johnson holds up a medallion with an image of Jesus in Logan Correctional Center on April 18, 2022. The medallion was given to Johnson by his family. Johnson is incarcerated for a murder committed by his then-partner and abuser. The little known “theory of accountability” law allows people to be punished for the acts of another person.

Shannon Heffernan/The Marshall Project

Patrick Johnson medallion

Pat Johnson holds up a medallion with an image of Jesus in Logan Correctional Center on April 18, 2022. The medallion was given to Johnson by his family. Johnson is incarcerated for a murder committed by his then-partner and abuser. The little known “theory of accountability” law allows people to be punished for the acts of another person.

Shannon Heffernan/The Marshall Project

How domestic violence survivors can be convicted for abusers’ crimes under Illinois law

The law allowed for one survivor to be sentenced for life with murder.

Pat Johnson holds up a medallion with an image of Jesus in Logan Correctional Center on April 18, 2022. The medallion was given to Johnson by his family. Johnson is incarcerated for a murder committed by his then-partner and abuser. The little known “theory of accountability” law allows people to be punished for the acts of another person.

Shannon Heffernan/The Marshall Project

   

Pat Johnson was in an abusive relationship and present when his partner murdered three people. Under the law of accountability, Johnson was charged with murder and sentenced to life in prison.

Reset discusses how other survivors of domestic abuse become incarcerated for their partner’s crimes, according to a new investigation.

GUEST: Shannon Heffernan, The Marshall Project reporter focused on prisons/jails

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