A Day To Remember: Honoring Mayor Richard G. Hatcher

Mayor Richard Hatcher of Gary, Ind., center, reads a telegram to the United States Senate that he and seven other mayors sent regarding a proposal to lift sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, in Pittsburgh, Penn., June 12, 1979, during the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Coleman Young of Detroit, left, and Maynard Jackson of Atlanta also spoke. (AP Photo)
Mayor Richard Hatcher of Gary, Ind., center, reads a telegram to the United States Senate that he and seven other mayors sent regarding a proposal to lift sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, in Pittsburgh, Penn., June 12, 1979, during the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Coleman Young of Detroit, left, and Maynard Jackson of Atlanta also spoke. (AP Photo)
Mayor Richard Hatcher of Gary, Ind., center, reads a telegram to the United States Senate that he and seven other mayors sent regarding a proposal to lift sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, in Pittsburgh, Penn., June 12, 1979, during the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Coleman Young of Detroit, left, and Maynard Jackson of Atlanta also spoke. (AP Photo)
Mayor Richard Hatcher of Gary, Ind., center, reads a telegram to the United States Senate that he and seven other mayors sent regarding a proposal to lift sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, in Pittsburgh, Penn., June 12, 1979, during the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Coleman Young of Detroit, left, and Maynard Jackson of Atlanta also spoke. (AP Photo)

A Day To Remember: Honoring Mayor Richard G. Hatcher

November 4th, 1967 marked the historic election of the United States’ first African-American mayor: Richard G. Hatcher in Gary, Indiana.

He led his campaign with the slogan, “Let’s get ourselves together.” Mayor Hatcher went on to lead a 20-year term after being elected.

Morning Shift talks with Mike Puente, WBEZ Northwest Indiana reporter, to reflect on the former mayor’s legacy and gives us a recap from this past weekend’s 50th anniversary event celebrating his election.