Story Of Japanese Internment Told Through Newly Unearthed Photos | WBEZ
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Story Of Japanese Internment Told Through Newly Unearthed Photos

The day after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, the U.S. war effort was quickly put in motion. Part of that effort was to arrest and detain more than 100,000 Japanese Americans. Some were immigrants. Some were first generation citizens. Some were 2nd or 3rd generation. All of them were deemed a potential threat to the country and shipped off to internment camps for most of the war. 

Much has been written about this shameful episode in our nation’s history, but a new book reveals some of the 7,000 official government photos of the people and the places they were sent. Many of these pictures were taken by the greatest photographers of their time. Photo historians Richard Cahan and Michael Williams talk about the process of uncovering these works and the stories behind them for their book Un-American: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II. 

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