‘The Color Of Law’ Explains How Government Policies Led To Segregation

Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit, Mich.’s Brewster-Douglass towers.
Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit, Mich.'s Brewster-Douglass towers. Paul Sancya/Associated Press
Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit, Mich.’s Brewster-Douglass towers.
Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit, Mich.'s Brewster-Douglass towers. Paul Sancya/Associated Press

‘The Color Of Law’ Explains How Government Policies Led To Segregation

Morning Shift is joined by Richard Rothstein, research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, author of the book The Color Of Law: A Forgotten History Of How Our Government Segregated America.