What Muslim Americans In Chicago Are Doing To Prepare For A Trump Presidency

Faateha Syed listens to a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016, attended by Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. Syed is also a member of the Girl Scouts of America. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Faateha Syed listens to a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016, attended by Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. Syed is also a member of the Girl Scouts of America. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP, file
Faateha Syed listens to a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016, attended by Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. Syed is also a member of the Girl Scouts of America. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Faateha Syed listens to a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016, attended by Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va. Syed is also a member of the Girl Scouts of America. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP, file

What Muslim Americans In Chicago Are Doing To Prepare For A Trump Presidency

Ever since Donald Trump won the election earlier this month, many of the marginalized groups he targeted during his campaign have wondered what his presidency will mean for them. One group, in particular, is using this time to organize.

The Council of American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, says it’s beefing up its legal team, promoting self-defense classes and encouraging Muslim Americans to learn their rights in the face of a Trump presidency. During his campaign, Trump vowed to ban all Muslims from entering the United States, promised to spy on mosques and said he would consider requiring a Muslim registry in America. More recently, his stance on these issues has blurred a bit, but many Muslim Americans are still preparing for the worst.

Morning Shift talks to Hoda Katebi, communications director of CAIR-Chicago, about how she and her organization are preparing for the next four years.