Coronavirus Czar Mike Pence Criticized For Handling Of Indiana HIV Outbreak

Indiana Needle Exchange
In this March 24, 2016 photo, Paula Maupin, the public health nurse for eastern Indiana's Fayette County, discusses the county's state-approved needle exchange program, in the county courthouse in Connersville, Ind. The cash-strapped rural county, which is facing a hepatitis C outbreak among intravenous drug users, is one of the Indiana counties to win state approval for the programs that provide those users with clean needles to reduce needle-sharing as a way to stop the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other diseases. But Indiana's counties have to find their own funding for their exchanges because state funding is banned from supporting them. Rick Callahan / AP Photo
Indiana Needle Exchange
In this March 24, 2016 photo, Paula Maupin, the public health nurse for eastern Indiana's Fayette County, discusses the county's state-approved needle exchange program, in the county courthouse in Connersville, Ind. The cash-strapped rural county, which is facing a hepatitis C outbreak among intravenous drug users, is one of the Indiana counties to win state approval for the programs that provide those users with clean needles to reduce needle-sharing as a way to stop the spread of HIV, hepatitis C and other diseases. But Indiana's counties have to find their own funding for their exchanges because state funding is banned from supporting them. Rick Callahan / AP Photo

Coronavirus Czar Mike Pence Criticized For Handling Of Indiana HIV Outbreak

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump tapped Vice President Mike Pence to lead the effort in protecting America from the coronavirus outbreak. Since the announcement, critics have recalled the vice president’s controversial handling of an HIV outbreak during his tenure as Indiana governor.

Reset hears from one critic on how Pence handled the HIV outbreak from 2014-2015.

GUEST: Steven W. Thrasher, inaugural Daniel H. Renberg chair of social justice in reporting and assistant professor of journalism at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism