Illinois Officials Warn About Phony Eclipse Glasses

Eclipse Glasses
An eclipse glasses sold out sign is posted outside the Clark Planetarium main doors advising people to safely view the eclipse with a pinhole projector after the planetarium ran out of glasses Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Brady McCombs / Associated Press
Eclipse Glasses
An eclipse glasses sold out sign is posted outside the Clark Planetarium main doors advising people to safely view the eclipse with a pinhole projector after the planetarium ran out of glasses Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Brady McCombs / Associated Press

Illinois Officials Warn About Phony Eclipse Glasses

Illinois officials say residents should beware of fraudsters seeking to profit from the buzz surrounding Monday’s solar eclipse. The warning concerns the selling of eclipse glasses that don’t protect your eyes.

WBEZ spoke with people who were on the hunt for glasses for the eclipse, including one man who mistakenly purchased phony glasses. Click play above to hear their stories.

The state attorney general’s office warns consumers they risk serious eye damage if they wear glasses that aren’t certified as having the correct filters.

The eclipse will be visible across the state and the total eclipse can be seen in southern Illinois. Except for a brief period in areas where the total eclipse is visible, no one should look directly at the sun without protective glasses.

Attorney General Lisa Madigan says anyone in the market for eclipse glasses “could get blindsided” by the scam if they aren’t careful. The American Astronomical Society provides lists of legitimate manufacturers and dealers.