Judge Sides With City In Chicago Food Truck Lawsuit

In this July 12, 2012 photo, Leah Wilcox packs up her Babycakes food truck after selling to customers in Chicago. An ordinance proposed by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel would finally allow trucks to cook and prepare food on board. While the trucks are already allowed on Chicago’s streets, current rules prohibit operators from so much as putting hot sauce on a taco for a customer. The proposal would continue to ban them from setting up shop any closer than 200 feet away from restaurants and capping the time they can stay put in one spot at two hours. The full City Council could vote on the proposal as soon as next week. (AP Photo/Sitthixay Ditthavong)
In this July 12, 2012 photo, Leah Wilcox packs up her Babycakes food truck after selling to customers in Chicago. An ordinance proposed by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel would finally allow trucks to cook and prepare food on board. While the trucks are already allowed on Chicago’s streets, current rules prohibit operators from so much as putting hot sauce on a taco for a customer. The proposal would continue to ban them from setting up shop any closer than 200 feet away from restaurants and capping the time they can stay put in one spot at two hours. Sitthixay Ditthavong/AP
In this July 12, 2012 photo, Leah Wilcox packs up her Babycakes food truck after selling to customers in Chicago. An ordinance proposed by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel would finally allow trucks to cook and prepare food on board. While the trucks are already allowed on Chicago’s streets, current rules prohibit operators from so much as putting hot sauce on a taco for a customer. The proposal would continue to ban them from setting up shop any closer than 200 feet away from restaurants and capping the time they can stay put in one spot at two hours. The full City Council could vote on the proposal as soon as next week. (AP Photo/Sitthixay Ditthavong)
In this July 12, 2012 photo, Leah Wilcox packs up her Babycakes food truck after selling to customers in Chicago. An ordinance proposed by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel would finally allow trucks to cook and prepare food on board. While the trucks are already allowed on Chicago’s streets, current rules prohibit operators from so much as putting hot sauce on a taco for a customer. The proposal would continue to ban them from setting up shop any closer than 200 feet away from restaurants and capping the time they can stay put in one spot at two hours. Sitthixay Ditthavong/AP

Judge Sides With City In Chicago Food Truck Lawsuit

CHICAGO (AP) — A Cook County circuit court judge has ruled against a Chicago food truck operator in a case involving city rules requiring mobile eateries to do business at least 200 feet from restaurants.

Judge Anna Helen Demacopoulos upheld the 200-foot rule Monday along with another rule requiring food trucks to use a city GPS tracking device.

Lawyers for Laura Pekarik, who has operated “Cupcakes for Courage” food truck for five years, had argued food truck owners have been hamstrung by the rules. They said Monday they plan to appeal the decision.

Their lawsuit argued Chicago can’t protect restaurants from competition and that the tracking devices are an illegal search under the Illinois Constitution.

The judge said Monday the law allows the city to strike a balance between competitive businesses.