Bombings In Thailand On The Heels Of Controversial Constitutional Referendum

Investigators work at the scene of an explosion in the resort town of Hua Hin, 240 kilometers (150 miles) south of Bangkok, Thailand on Friday. The blast followed a series of two explosions in Hua Hin Thursday evening that left one person dead and a number injured.
Investigators work at the scene of an explosion in the resort town of Hua Hin, 240 kilometers (150 miles) south of Bangkok, Thailand on Friday. The blast followed a series of two explosions in Hua Hin Thursday evening that left one person dead and a number injured. Jerry Harmer / AP Photo
Investigators work at the scene of an explosion in the resort town of Hua Hin, 240 kilometers (150 miles) south of Bangkok, Thailand on Friday. The blast followed a series of two explosions in Hua Hin Thursday evening that left one person dead and a number injured.
Investigators work at the scene of an explosion in the resort town of Hua Hin, 240 kilometers (150 miles) south of Bangkok, Thailand on Friday. The blast followed a series of two explosions in Hua Hin Thursday evening that left one person dead and a number injured. Jerry Harmer / AP Photo

Bombings In Thailand On The Heels Of Controversial Constitutional Referendum

A string of coordinated bombings rocked Thailand today, only days after the country voted for a military-written draft constitution.

While no one has taken responsibility for the blasts, some suspect Malay insurgents and others blame supporters of former Prime Minister Thaksin Chinnawat. Chinnawat’s populist party was ousted in a 2014 military coup, and his supporters have resisted changes in the constitution.

The new constitution, which was officially supported by 61.45% of Thais, gives the military authority to appoint senators and dictate elections for Prime Minister.

But Paul Chambers, Director of Research at the Institute of Southeast Asian Affairs at Chiang Mai University, says that inconsistencies in the vote could challenge the legitimacy of the new constitution. Prof. Chambers joins us to talk about the Thai referendum, the military and possible connections to today’s attacks.