Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?

GREECE AID WORKERS TRIAL
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 file photo, Salam Aldeen, from a Copenhagen-based charity organization, carries two babies as Syrian refugees arrive on an overcrowded dinghy after crossing from Turkey to the island of Lesbos, Greece. Aldeen is one of five members of international aid groups from Spain and Denmark that have been cleared Monday, May 7, 2018 in court on charges of attempting to illegally bring migrants into Lesbos island, Greece. Petros Giannakouris / AP Photo
GREECE AID WORKERS TRIAL
In this Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015 file photo, Salam Aldeen, from a Copenhagen-based charity organization, carries two babies as Syrian refugees arrive on an overcrowded dinghy after crossing from Turkey to the island of Lesbos, Greece. Aldeen is one of five members of international aid groups from Spain and Denmark that have been cleared Monday, May 7, 2018 in court on charges of attempting to illegally bring migrants into Lesbos island, Greece. Petros Giannakouris / AP Photo

Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?

Mass migration of refugees is a current topic of heated political debate in the media. According to Jacqueline Bhabha, it’s not really a crisis, nor is it a historical first. In her book Can We Solve the Migration Crisis?, Bhabha, a professor of Practice of Health and Human Rights at Harvard University, uses philosophy to justify her claim that aiding and assisting refugees is not only an obligation that foreign governments must uphold, but is also the morally right thing to do. Bhabha releases her book amid a global rise of xenophobia and political ethnic nationalism. Recently, the Trump administration issued a proposal that would make it harder for legal immigrants to become U.S. citizens. Bhabha joins us to put the current wave of mass migration into context, and whether we can solve this “crisis”.